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Houston, We Have a Problem: NASA and Open Innovation (A)

by Michael L. Tushman Kerry Herman Hila Lifshitz-Assaf

Jeff Davis, director of Space Life Sciences Directorate at NASA, has been working for several years to raise awareness amongst scientists and researchers in his organizations of the benefits of open innovation as a successful and efficient way to collaborate on difficult research problems regarding health and space travel. Despite a number of initiatives, SLSD members have been skeptical about incorporating the approach into their day-to-day research and work, and have resisted Davis's and his strategy team's efforts. The (A) case outlines these efforts and the organization members' reactions. The (B) case details what Davis and the SLSD strategy team learned, and how they adapted their efforts to successfully incorporate open innovation as one of many tools used in collaborative research at NASA.

Houston, We Have a Solution: NASA and Open Innovation (B)

by Michael L. Tushman Kerry Herman Hila Lifshitz-Assaf

Jeff Davis, director of Space Life Sciences Directorate at NASA, has been working for several years to raise awareness amongst scientists and researchers in his organizations of the benefits of open innovation as a successful and efficient way to collaborate on difficult research problems regarding health and space travel. Despite a number of initiatives, SLSD members have been skeptical about incorporating the approach into their day-to-day research and work, and have resisted Davis's and his strategy team's efforts. The (A) case outlines these efforts and the organization members' reactions. The (B) case details what Davis and the SLSD strategy team learned, and how they adapted their efforts to successfully incorporate open innovation as one of many tools used in collaborative research at NASA.

How a Comic Book is Made

by Michael Sandler

People around the world love colorful, action-packed comic books. Find out who makes comic books, and how they do it.

How a House is Built

by Gail Gibbons

Gail Gibbons uses clear, simple wording to present all the steps involved in building a house. From the architect who draws the plans, through the various types of workers who construct it, to the family who will make the house their home, each aspect is explained. Children can easily follow along as construction begins at the ground level with surveyors, describing the jobs of carpenters and plumbers. The many tools used to complete each task are explained, ultimately showing how all the workers' efforts come together to build a whole house from basement to roof, both inside and outside.

How about Demons?

by Felicitas D. Goodman

"Quite an interesting book... " --Religious Studies Review"It is by far superior to anything else on demons we have seen in the past few years." --The American Rationalist"... Goodman is to be commended for a stimulating and wide-reaching treatment of a compelling and much-debated subject." --Journal of Folklore ResearchRich in detail derived from the author's fieldwork and the anthropological literature, this work paints a picture of possession as one of the usually positive and most widespread of human religious experiences. It also details the ritual of exorcism, which is applied when things go wrong.

How Alexander Hamilton Screwed Up America

by Ron Paul Brion Mcclanahan

He is the star of a hit Broadway musical, the face on the ten dollar bill, and a central figure among the founding fathers. But do you really know Alexander Hamilton? <P><P>Rather than lionize Hamilton, Americans should carefully consider his most significant and ultimately detrimental contribution to modern society: the shredding of the United States Constitution.Connecting the dots between Hamilton’s invention of implied powers in 1791 to transgender bathrooms and same-sex marriage two centuries later, Brion McClanahan shows the origins of our modern federal leviathan.

How Am I Smart?: A Parent's Guide to Multiple Intelligences

by Kathy Koch

Has your daughter come to you in tears, asking, "Am I smart?" Or has your son wanted to know, "How smart am I?" Dr. Kathy wants children to ask an even more important question, "How am I smart?" When parents determine ways children can be smart, they'll better understand their own children's educational needs and how they learn best.

How America Eats: A Social History of U. S. Food and Culture (American Ways)

by Jennifer Jensen Wallach

<p><i>How America Eats: A Social History of U.S. Food and Culture</i>, by food and social historian Jennifer Wallach, sheds a new and interesting light on American history by way of the dinner table. It is, at once, a study of America's diverse culinary history and a look at the country's unique and unprecedented journey to the present day. While undeniably a "melting pot" of different cultures and cuisines, America's food habits have been shaped as much by technological innovations and industrial progress as by the intermingling and mixture of ethnic cultures. By studying what Americans have been eating since the colonial era, we are further enlightened to the conflicting ways in which Americans have chosen to define themselves, their culture, their beliefs, and the changes those definitions have undergone over time. <p>Understanding the American diet is the first step toward grasping the larger truths, the complex American narratives that have long been swept under the table, and the evolving answers to the question: What does it mean to be American?

How America Lost Its Secrets: Edward Snowden, the Man and the Theft

by Edward Jay Epstein

A groundbreaking exposé that convincingly challenges the popular image of Edward Snowden as hacker turned avenging angel, while revealing how vulnerable our national security systems have become--as exciting as any political thriller, and far more important. After details of American government surveillance were published in 2013, Edward Snowden, formerly a subcontracted IT analyst for the NSA, became the center of an international controversy: Was he a hero, traitor, whistle-blower, spy? Was his theft legitimized by the nature of the information he exposed? When is it necessary for governmental transparency to give way to subterfuge? Edward Jay Epstein brings a lifetime of journalistic and investigative acumen to bear on these and other questions, delving into both how our secrets were taken and the man who took them. He makes clear that by outsourcing parts of our security apparatus, the government has made classified information far more vulnerable; how Snowden sought employment precisely where he could most easily gain access to the most sensitive classified material; and how, though he claims to have acted to serve his country, Snowden is treated as a prized intelligence asset in Moscow, his new home.From the Hardcover edition.

How and When to Be Your Own Doctor

by Isabelle A. Moser Steve Solomon

Dr. Isabelle A. Moser and Steve Solomon collaborated on How and When to Be Your Own Doctor. When Solomon reached his late thirties, he began looking for healthy alternatives. He met Moser and began the practice of a yearly fast to cleanse his body. This book contains their combined knowledge on healing. Topics include How I Became a Hygienist, The Nature and Cause of Disease, Fasting, Colon Cleansing, Diet and Nutrition, Vitamins and Other Food Supplements and The Analysis of Disease States--Helping the Body Recover.

How Animals Develop: A Short Account Of The Science Of Embryology - Primary Source Edition (Routledge Revivals: Selected Works of C. H. Waddington)

by C. H. Waddington

First published in 1935 (this edition in 1946), this short account of the science of embryology was the first book in English to provide a simple outline of the whole of this important subject. The study of development is perhaps the best method of approach to the most fundamental of all biological problems, the problem of how all the diverse activities are integrated so as to make up a complete individual organism. The book gives a short sketch of the general pattern on which all animals are built, but devotes more attention to the factors which cause the development of the elements in the pattern, and which then bring them into correct relations with one another. This volume is simply written in order to enable the general reader to understand the revolutionary advances made in the subject at that time.

How Animals Grieve

by Barbara J. King

From the time of our earliest childhood encounters with animals, we casually ascribe familiar emotions to them. But scientists have long cautioned against such anthropomorphizing, arguing that it limits our ability to truly comprehend the lives of other creatures. Recently, however, things have begun to shift in the other direction, and anthropologist Barbara J. King is at the forefront of that movement, arguing strenuously that we can and "should" attend to animal emotions. With "How Animals Grieve," she draws our attention to the specific case of grief, and relates story after story from fieldsites, farms, homes, and more of animals mourning lost companions, mates, or friends. King tells of elephants surrounding their matriarch as she weakens and dies, and, in the following days, attending to her corpse as if holding a vigil. A housecat loses her sister, from whom she's never before been parted, and spends weeks pacing the apartment, wailing plaintively. A baboon loses her daughter to a predator and sinks into grief. In each case, King uses her anthropological training to interpret and try to explain what we see to help us understand this animal grief properly, as something neither the same as nor wholly different from the human experience of loss. The resulting book is both daring and down-to-earth, strikingly ambitious even as it is careful to acknowledge the limits of our understanding. Through the moving stories she chronicles and analyzes so beautifully, King brings us closer to the animals with whom we share a planet, and helps us see our own experiences, attachments, and emotions as part of a larger web of life, death, love, and loss.

How Animals Talk: And Other Pleasant Studies of Birds and Beasts

by William J. Long Marc Bekoff Rupert Sheldrake

The classic and original text that first explored the telepathic methods of communication of wild animals • Based on years of detailed field observations, first published in 1919 • Written by the famous American naturalist who was the first to study telepathy in the wild • Forewords by biologists Rupert Sheldrake, who has spent 15 years researching the unexplained powers of animals, and Marc Bekoff, the editor of the three-volume Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior Many sources have commented on the silent communication abilities of pets, but never before and not since the first publication of this book in 1919 has the subject of animal telepathy in the wild been so fully researched. How Animals Talk explores the phenomenon of vocal, silent, and even motionless communication among animals. From crow talk to instant herd communication, author William J. Long theorizes that animals are much more intelligent, emotional, and moral than we have traditionally thought and that their ability to sense the presence of other living beings is an innate ability shared by humans as well. Based on many years of field observations, this classic text contains numerous examples of animal behavior that defy conventional explanation. Long believed in the importance and validity of anecdotal evidence. He recognized the dangers of conventional research in reducing animals to mere numbers and how the cold third-person prose of scientific study can objectify animals, distancing "us" from "them." His findings on the impact of our presence on animal life--and the cost that we pay in separating ourselves from animals, who help define our place in the natural world--may be more relevant today than ever before.

How Art Can Be Thought: A Handbook for Change

by Allan DeSouza

What terms do we use to describe and evaluate art, and how do we judge if art is good, and if it is for the social good? In How Art Can Be Thought Allan deSouza investigates such questions and the popular terminology through which art is discussed, valued, and taught. Adapting art viewing to contemporary demands within a rapidly changing world, deSouza outlines how art functions as politicized culture within a global industry. In addition to offering new pedagogical strategies for MFA programs and the training of artists, he provides an extensive analytical glossary of some of the most common terms used to discuss art while focusing on their current and changing usage. He also shows how these terms may be crafted to new artistic and social practices, particularly in what it means to decolonize the places of display and learning. DeSouza's work will be invaluable to the casual gallery visitor and the arts professional alike, to all those who regularly look at, think about, and make art—especially art students and faculty, artists, art critics, and curators.

How Asia Works: Success and Failure In the World's Most Dynamic Region

by Joe Studwell

In the 1980s and 1990s many in the West came to believe in the myth of an East-Asian economic miracle. Japan was going to dominate, then China. Countries were called "tigers” or "mini-dragons,” and were seen as not just development prodigies, but as a unified bloc, culturally and economically similar, and inexorably on the rise.Joe Studwell has spent two decades as a reporter in the region, and The Financial Times said he "should be named chief myth-buster for Asian business.” In How Asia Works, Studwell distills his extensive research into the economies of nine countries-Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, Vietnam, and China-into an accessible, readable narrative that debunks Western misconceptions, shows what really happened in Asia and why, and for once makes clear why some countries have boomed while others have languished.Studwell’s in-depth analysis focuses on three main areas: land policy, manufacturing, and finance. Land reform has been essential to the success of Asian economies, giving a kick start to development by utilizing a large workforce and providing capital for growth. With manufacturing, industrial development alone is not sufficient, Studwell argues. Instead, countries need "export discipline,” a government that forces companies to compete on the global scale. And in finance, effective regulation is essential for fostering, and sustaining growth. To explore all of these subjects, Studwell journeys far and wide, drawing on fascinating examples from a Philippine sugar baron’s stifling of reform to the explosive growth at a Korean steel mill.Thoroughly researched and impressive in scope, How Asia Works is essential reading for anyone interested in the development of these dynamic countries, a region that will shape the future of the world.

How Beauty Saved Beast

by Belle Maurice

This adult fairy tale has all the classics - a curse, a beast, and the beautiful woman destined to save him . . . or does it?Cursed with insatiable lust and slowly transforming into a beast, the master of the castle sends his gamekeeper out to the nearby villages to choose girls to satisfy him. When the gamekeeper chooses her sister, Serena offers herself instead and is swept away to the castle, sure she will be driven mad by the Beast's demands.Except his demands are not so unwelcome, and Serena finds herself wanting to please him, confusing the Beast, and then terrifying him. If he gives her his heart, he will only lose it when he finally transforms and she abandons him. Why bring on more pain? She is there to be used, nothing more. But Serena refuses to be just an object for sexual satisfaction.She wants to be everything to the Beast. She wants him to love her.

How Blacks Built America: Labor, Culture, Freedom, and Democracy

by Joe R. Feagin

How Blacks Built America examines the many positive and dramatic contributions made by African Americans to this country over its long history. Almost all public and scholarly discussion of African Americans accenting their distinctive societal position, especially discussion outside black communities, has emphasized either stereotypically negative features or the negative socioeconomic conditions that they have long faced because of systemic racism. In contrast, Feagin reveals that African Americans have long been an extraordinarily important asset for this country. Without their essential contributions, indeed, there probably would not have been a United States. This is an ideal addition to courses race and ethnicity courses.

How Bodies Work: Animal Physiology

by Bridget Anderson

Do you ever wonder what makes you grow? Or why you shiver when you are cold? Have you ever marveled at the speed of a cheetah, the fastest land animal on Earth? Or been awed at how a chameleon can change color? Solving such mysteries is part and parcel of animal physiology, the science that investigates how different animal bodies work. Learning how they do increases our appreciation of the uniqueness and diversity of the vast animal kingdom, and adds to our understanding of how our own bodies work. HOW BODIES WORK: ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY offers a glimpse inside ourselves and the amazing world around us.

How Books Came to America: The Rise of the American Book Trade (Penn State Series in the History of the Book #17)

by John Hruschka

Anyone who pays attention to the popular press knows that the new media will soon make books obsolete. But predicting the imminent demise of the book is nothing new. At the beginning of the twentieth century, for example, some critics predicted that the electro-mechanical phonograph would soon make books obsolete. Still, despite the challenges of a century and a half of new media, books remain popular, with Americans purchasing more than eight million books each day. In How Books Came to America, John Hruschka traces the development of the American book trade from the moment of European contact with the Americas, through the growth of regional book trades in the early English colonial cities, to the more or less unified national book trade that emerged after the American Civil War and flourished in the twentieth century. He examines the variety of technological, historical, cultural, political, and personal forces that shaped the American book trade, paying particular attention to the contributions of the German bookseller Frederick Leypoldt and his journal, Publishers Weekly.Unlike many studies of the book business, How Books Came to America is more concerned with business than it is with books. Its focus is on how books are manufactured and sold, rather than how they are written and read. It is, nevertheless, the story of the people who created and influenced the book business in the colonies and the United States. Famous names in the American book trade—Benjamin Franklin, Robert Hoe, the Harpers, Henry Holt, and Melvil Dewey—are joined by more obscure names like Joseph Glover, Conrad Beissel, and the aforementioned Frederick Leypoldt. Together, they made the American book trade the unique commercial institution it is today.

How 'Bout Them Cowboys?: Inside the Huddle with the Stars and Legends of America's Team

by Gary Myers

Welcome to Jerryworld and an all-access pass to the most valuable sports franchise on the planet, the Dallas Cowboys.Many books have been written about the Cowboys, but there's never been an account like this one. HOW 'BOUT THEM COWBOYS tells the story of the NFL's most successful franchise, with special access to its outspoken owner, Jerry Jones, his sons Stephen and Jerry Jr., daughter Charlotte, and dozens of interviews of current and former players and coaches, and characters from across Cowboy Nation. While tracking the successes and controversies of some of the biggest names in the NFL on and off the field, HOW 'BOUT THEM COWBOYS? remembers the legends of previous generations, and explains why the star on the helmet has become iconic, and how a little expansion team from North Texas has evolved into a global $5 billion brand.Primed for their make-or-break 2018 season, HOW 'BOUT THEM COWBOYS? delivers a fun and surprising account of America's Team, its greatest celebrities, its mercurial management, the vicious rivalries, and the enduring saga that makes this the most popular and polarizing team in sports.

How Brains Think

by William H. Calvin

If you’re good at finding the one right answer to life’s multiple-choice questions, you’re ”smart. ” But ”intelligence” is what you need when contemplating the leftovers in the refrigerator, trying to figure out what might go with them; or if you’re trying to speak a sentence that you’ve never spoken before. As Jean Piaget said, intelligence is what you use when you don’t know what to do, when all the standard answers are inadequate. This book tries to fathom how our inner life evolves from one topic to another, as we create and reject alternatives. Ever since Darwin, we’ve known that elegant things can emerge (indeed, self-organize) from ”simpler” beginnings. And, says theoretical neurophysiologist William H. Calvin, the bootstrapping of new ideas works much like the immune response or the evolution of a new animal species--except that the brain can turn the Darwinian crank a lot faster, on the time scale of thought and action. Drawing on anthropology, evolutionary biology, linguistics, and the neurosciences, Calvin also considers how a more intelligent brain developed using slow biological improvements over the last few million years. Long ago, evolving jack-of-all trades versatility was encouraged by abrupt climate changes. Now, evolving intelligence uses a nonbiological track: augmenting human intelligence and building intelligent machines.

How British Rule Changed India’s Economy: The Paradox of the Raj (Palgrave Studies in Economic History)

by Tirthankar Roy

This Palgrave Pivot revisits the topic of how British colonialism moulded work and life in India and what kind of legacy it left behind. Did British rule lead to India’s impoverishment, economic disruption and famine? Under British rule, evidence suggests there were beneficial improvements, with an eventual rise in life expectancy and an increase in wealth for some sectors of the population and economy, notably for much business and industry. Yet many poor people suffered badly, with agricultural stagnation and an underfunded government who were too small to effect general improvements. In this book Roy explains the paradoxical combination of wealth and poverty, looking at both sides of nineteenth century capitalism. Between 1850 and 1930, India was engaged in a globalization process not unlike the one it has seen since the 1990s. The difference between these two times is that much of the region was under British colonial rule during the first episode, while it was an independent nation state during the second. Roy's narrative has a contemporary relevance for emerging economies, where again globalization has unleashed extraordinary levels of capitalistic energy while leaving many livelihoods poor, stagnant, and discontented.

How Buildings Learn

by Stewart Brand

Buildings have often been studies whole in space, but never before have they been studied whole in time. How Buildings Learn is a masterful new synthesis that proposes that buildings adapt best when constantly refined and reshaped by their occupants, and that architects can mature from being artists of space to becoming artists of time. From the connected farmhouses of New England to I.M. Pei's Media Lab, from "satisficing" to "form follows funding," from the evolution of bungalows to the invention of Santa Fe Style, from Low Road military surplus buildings to a High Road English classic like Chatsworth--this is a far-ranging survey of unexplored essential territory. More than any other human artifacts, buildings improve with time--if they're allowed to. How Buildings Learn shows how to work with time rather than against it.

How Buildings Work

by Huw M Evans

An understanding of building physics is fundamental for the design and construction of safe, functional, energy efficient buildings. Without it, occupants’ health and comfort is compromised, energy bills become unmanageable, or the building fabric itself can fail. But it’s not just about providing a heating source or stopping the cold coming in; at the heart of building physics is a fine balancing act: how much ventilation will be required for the occupants and how can that be provided without compromising the thermal performance? How will the layout and fenestration affect light levels and cooling demand? How Buildings Work provides construction professionals with a clear understanding of the basic mechanisms of physics and how they affect the performance and operation of buildings. Heat, air, moisture, sound, light and radioactivity are explained in turn, yet all the while reminding the reader that none of these phenomena can be considered in isolation when designing a building. Whether you’re a student trying to get your head round the basics, or a seasoned practitioner looking for a quick refresher course.

How Can I Be Down?

by Brenda Hampton

As he struggles to control his drug empire and keep his cutthroat girlfriend in check, Kiley Jacoby Abrams has the next several months cut out for him. If that's not enough, he's got more setbacks than one man can handle: an arrogant and troublesome brother, a sneaky playa-hating friend, another friend who turns to him for everything, and a woman who only claims to have his back. Kiley's life is full of secrets from the past, and for as long as he can remember, he's been running from a life of crime. Moving from Los Angeles to St. Louis doesn't allow him the change his heart desires, and Kiley soon realizes that trouble is his middle name. His fight to turn his life around doesn't last for long. When a new love interests comes knocking at his door, she offers Kiley a life of stability--or possibly a new journey that may lead him straight to the devil's lonely hell.

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