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Crash Out

by David Goewey

The enthralling and evocative story of tough Depression-era bandits who vowed to make something of themselves, even if that meant defying the stone walls of America's most infamous prison, by a writer who grew up in Sing Sing's shadow. During an era of never-ending breadlines and corrupt cops, no place churned out budding crooks more efficiently than Hell's Kitchen. Neighborhood loyalties bonded gangs of immigrant sons who were looking for a way out of 1930s New York, and waterfront kids like Whitey Riordan paid the bills with small-time hustling. But when enterprising crook Patches Waters invited Whitey into the Shopping Bag Gang, Whitey jumped at the big score. Bold black headlines announced the group's string of successful heists, but the gravy train abruptly halted in 1939 when someone squealed and police captured most of the gang. Patches and Whitey were sent up the river to Sing Sing. Westside connections couldn't help much there, in the infamous Hudson River prison that had housed convicts for more than a century. In Sing Sing the boys had to answer to veteran warden Lewis Lawes, a revolutionary reformer who preferred trust and rehabilitation to old standbys like the lash and the yoke. Progressive indeed, but nothing changed the fact that Whitey and Patches, along with more than 2,800 other men, faced a future of endless days in a cage of limestone, cement, and steel. Perhaps inevitably, their thoughts turned to escape. A string of well-publicized jailhouse riots and breakouts captured the country's interest in the 1930s, and though prisons kept stepping up security, convicts continued to crash out. When Patches encountered an old cellblock crony who had stumbled upon a way out, he pieced together a daring escape plot involving purloined guns, counterfeit keys, precision timing, a complex network of outside accomplices, and the kind of outsize bravado that would have made Dillinger proud. Unable to resist the thought of freedom, Whitey signed on. On Easter Sunday 1941, the three embarked upon the most sensational breakout in the prison's history. Leaving four men dead and indelibly staining the reputation of the nation's most famous warden, the Westside boys transcended their wildest dreams, only to find themselves backed to the edge of a wide, dark river. Meticulously researched and beautifully written,Crash Outis a gritty, page-turning saga that reveals how the career of one resilient hustler can illuminate a sliver of Americana. A riveting account of the boldest escape in Sing Sing history and the gangster culture that birthed the defiant bandits,Crash Outis a gripping historical epic set against the fascinating backdrop of Depression-era New York. From the Hardcover edition.

Do You Speak American?

by Robert Macneil William Cran

As America unceasingly reinvents itself, it must continually create language to express that reinvention--or so argue journalists MacNeil (former co-anchor of MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour) and Cran. Here, they address such topical issues as whether or not American grammatical standards are declining, if mass media is homogenizing speech, and if Spanish is threatening to displace English in the United States. While written for a general audience. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Four Great American Classics

by Nathaniel Hawthorne Mark Twain Stephen Crane Herman Melville

These four landmark novels of nineteenth-century American literature have gained a permanent place in our culture as great classics. They are not only part of our national heritage, but masterpieces of world literature whose deep and lasting influence is felt to this day. The Scarlet Letter vividly records America's moral and historical roots in Puritan New England and masterfully re-creates a society's preoccupation with sin, guilt, and pride. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn carries readers along on Huck's unforgettable journey down the Mississippi in America's foremost comic epic--the first great novel in a truly American voice. The Red Badge of Courage re-creates the brutal reality of war and its psychological impact on a young Civil War soldier in one of the most moving and widely read American novels. Billy Budd, Sailor, joins the world's great tragic literature as a doomed seaman becomes the innocent victim of a clash between social authority and individual freedom. From the Paperback edition.

Four Steps to the Altar

by Jean Stone

They say true love is priceless, but is it worth fifty million dollars? With Second Chances, their wedding planning business, starting to take off, four best friends must decide whether they'll take some second chances of their own. Free-spirited Lily finds herself forced to choose between her sure-thing inheritance and a chance at true love; the no-longer-predictable Elaine surprises everyone-including herself-when romance comes calling from her past; Sarah, the uncompromisingly unconventional artist, finds herself contemplating the most unexpected choice of all; and the always-clear-eyed Jo suddenly finds herself second-guessing her own second chance at happily-ever-after. The choice for each of them is "I do" or "I don't," and the decision will change their lives. Breakups, makeups, and romance at every turn-life always offers up its best surprises to those who leave themselves open to the possibility of second chances. From the Paperback edition.

A History of the Jews in the Modern World

by Howard M. Sachar

Historian Sachar writes of the history of the Jews over the past 400 years, from Western Europe's 17th century age of mercantilism, to the 21st century struggle for Soviet Jewry. While he addresses the rise of Zionism and the birth of the State of Israel, he does not provide a comprehensive examination of the independent nation, explaining that it deserves its own separate treatment. He includes less common subjects such as the Sephardic-Oriental diaspora, and the Jews of Africa and of Moslem regions, and concludes with a prognosis for the 21st century. Annotation ©2005 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Holy Blood, Holy Grail

by Michael Baigent Richard Leigh Henry Lincoln

Is the traditional, accepted view of the life of Christ in some way incomplete? * Is it possible Christ did not die on the cross? * Is it possible Jesus was married, a father, and that his bloodline still exists? * Is it possible that parchments found in the South of France a century ago reveal one of the best-kept secrets of Christendom? * Is it possible that these parchments contain the very heart of the mystery of the Holy Grail? According to the authors of this extraordinarily provocative, meticulously researched book, not only are these things possible -- they are probably true! so revolutionary, so original, so convincing, that the most faithful Christians will be moved; here is the book that has sparked worldwide controversey. "Enough to seriously challenge many traditional Christian beliefs, if not alter them. " --Los Angeles Times Book Review "LikeChariots of the Gods?. . . the plot has all the elements of an international thriller. " --Newsweek From the Paperback edition.

How the Republicans Stole Christmas

by Bill Press

In the wake of an election seen by many as a triumphant victory for "moral values," political commentator and one-time seminarian Bill Press launches a counteroffensive against the so-called religious right. For decades, Press argues, conservative preachers such as Jerry Falwell, Pat Robertson, and James Dobson--joined by most Catholic bishops--have defined religion so narrowly that Democrats and liberals have been pushed outside the fold. According to their narrow gospel, God put George Bush in the White House to deal with gays, guns, and abortion--and those who don't agree are on the sure road to hell. Bill Press says it's time to take religion back: "Who gave this gang the inside track on religion, anyway? The way I read the Gospels, Jesus was as liberal as Paul Wellstone. He sure as hell wouldn't have been a registered Republican. One other thing's for sure: if Jesus ever came back to earth, there's one gang he wouldn't hang out with; and that's this phony bunch of pious, puffed-up preachers who wear religion on their sleeves. " How the Republicans Stole Christmasis also Press's fervent call to Democrats and liberals to reclaim religion and return it to its basic principles of social justice, charity, and tolerance. Press argues that the Right didn't just steal religion, the Left let them have it, offering no resistance as conservatives dictated what's right and what's wrong. But on today's social issues, according to Press, religious conservatives have gotten it all wrong. They have turned Jesus from a loving Messiah who championed the poor and dispossessed into a cold-blooded advocate for the rich and powerful. Press does not confine his criticisms to so-called Christian leaders; he uncovers the same wrong-headed tendencies in other faiths and among nonbelievers, who even today cling to the Old Testament as an appropriate code of behavior. From the Hardcover edition.

The Ingenuity Gap

by Thomas Homer-Dixon

"The most persuasive forecast of the 21st century I have seen. " -- E. O. Wilson, author ofConsilience: The Unity of Knowledgeand twice winner of a Pulitzer prize "Human beings have been smart enough to turn nature to their ends, generate vast wealth for themselves, and double their average life span. But are they smart enough to solve the problems of the 21st century?" --Thomas Homer-Dixon Can we create ideas fast enough to solve the very problems -- environmental, social, and technological -- we've created? Homer-Dixon pinpoints the "ingenuity gap" as the critical problem we face today, and tackles it in a riveting, groundbreaking examination of a world that is rapidly exceeding our intellectual grasp. InThe Ingenuity Gap, Thomas Homer-Dixon, "global guru" (theToronto Star), "genuine academic celebrity" (Saturday Night) and "one of Canada's most talked about and controversial scholars" (Maclean's) asks: is our world becoming too complex, too fast-paced to manage? The challenges facing us -- ranging from international financial crises and global climate change to pandemics of tuberculosis and AIDS- converge, intertwine, and remain largely beyond our ken. Most of suspect the "experts don't really know what's going on; that as a species we've released forces that are neither managed nor manageable. We are fast approaching a time when we may no longer be able to control a world that increasingly exceeds our grasp. This is "the ingenuity gap" -- the term coined by Thomas Homer-Dixon, political scientist and advisor to the White House -- the critical gap between our need for practical, innovative ideas to solve complex problems and our actual supply of those ideas. Through gripping narrative stories and incidents that exemplify his arguments, he takes us on a world tour that begins with a heartstopping description of the tragic crash of United Airlines Flight 232 from Denver to Chicago and includes Las Vegas in its desert, a wilderness beach in British Columbia, and his solitary search for a little girl in Patna, India. He shows how, in our complex world, while poor countries are particularly vulnerable to ingenuity gaps, our own rich countries are not immune, and we are caught dangerously between a soaring requirement for ingenuity and an increasingly uncertain supply. When the gap widens, political disintegration and violent upheaval can result, reaching into our own economies and daily lives in subtle ways. In compelling, lucid, prose, he makes real the problems we face and suggests how we might overcome them -- in our own lives, our thing, our business and our societies. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Lara Croft: Tomb Raider: The Man of Bronze

by James Alan Gardner

NEW ADVENTURES BASED ON THE WORLD'S BESTSELLING VIDEO GAMEAfter completing a near-fatal mission in the mysterious cloud forests of Peru, Lara Croft flies to Warsaw to tackle her next assignment-and finds herself in the middle of an epic battle for the ultimate power.Reuben Baptiste needs Lara Croft's help transporting precious cargo. But before Reuben can reveal any details, he is murdered-and Lara signs on with Reuben's employer, the mysterious Order of the Bronze, to avenge his death. The Order shares with Lara its greatest treasure: a bronze android, thousands of years old, with uncanny abilities. But the android is crippled, missing a leg, and whoever finds that leg will gain astonishing powers. Hot on the trail is Lara's nemesis, Lancaster Urdmann, now working for an unknown employer with strange abilities. As Lara jets from Siberia to Australia to Rio de Janiero, she is drawn into an age-old conflict of secret societies, intrigue, and death. . . .From the Paperback edition.

Lincoln

by Richard Carwardine

Carwardine (American history, Oxford U. ) received the Lincoln Award--the first British scholar to do so--for this biography, originally published in 2003 by Pearson/Longman. Half of it addresses Lincoln's (1809-65) career and the roots of his political ambition before he became president of the US. Annotation ©2006 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Lost in My Own Backyard

by Tim Cahill

"Let's get lost together . . . " Lost in My Own Backyard brings acclaimed author Tim Cahill together with one of his--and America's--favorite destinations: Yellowstone, the world's first national park. Cahill has been "puttering around in the park" for a quarter of a century, slowly covering its vast scope and exploring its remote backwoods. So does this mean that he knows what he's doing? Hardly. "I live fifty miles from the park," says Cahill, "but proximity does not guarantee competence. I've spent entire afternoons not knowing exactly where I was, which is to say, I was lost in my own backyard. " Cahill stumbles from glacier to geyser, encounters wildlife (some of it, like bisons, weighing in the neighborhood of a ton), muses on the microbiology of thermal pools, gets spooked in the mysterious Hoodoos, sees moonbows arcing across waterfalls at midnight, and generally has a fine old time walking several hundred miles while contemplating the concept and value of wilderness. Mostly, Cahill says, "I have resisted the urge to commit philosophy. This is difficult to do when you're alone, twenty miles from the nearest road, and you've just found a grizzly bear track the size of a pizza. " Divided into three parts--"The Trails," which offers a variety of favorite day hikes; "In the Backcountry," which explores three great backcountry trails very much off the beaten track; and "A Selected Yellowstone Bookshelf," an annotated bibliography of his favorite books on the park--this is a hilarious, informative, and perfect guide for Yellowstone veterans and first-timers alike. Lost in My Own Backyard is adventure writing at its very best. From the Hardcover edition.

Mosses from an Old Manse

by Nathaniel Hawthorne

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

My Bondage and My Freedom

by Frederick Douglass

Douglass (1817-1895) recounts his escape from slavery and life afterwards, and more generally describes the experience of slaves in antebellum Maryland. The complete 1855 edition is augmented with an introduction by Bill E. Lawson (philosophy, Michigan State U. ) and appendices of speeches and letters. Annotation c. Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Romola

by George Eliot

One of George Eliot's seven classic novels. She is best known for Middlemarch, Silas Marner, and The Mill on the Floss. According to Wikipedia: "Mary Ann (Marian) Evans (22 November 1819 â " 22 December 1880), better known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist. She was one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. Her novels, largely set in provincial England, are well known for their realism and psychological perspicacity. She used a male pen name, she said, to ensure that her works were taken seriously. Female authors published freely under their own names, but Eliot wanted to ensure that she was not seen as merely a writer of romances. An additional factor may have been a desire to shield her private life from public scrutiny and to prevent scandals attending her relationship with the married George Henry Lewes. "

The Rose and the Warrior

by Karyn Monk

In the breathtaking tradition ofOnce a WarriorandThe Witch and the Warriorcomes Karyn Monk's passionate new tale of a distant time, a proud people--and a forbidden love. She was an infamous thief. . . When the ruthless MacTiers destroyed Melantha's clan, she vowed to do whatever was necessary to keep her people alive. It was a daring risk to disguise herself as "the Falcon," a mysterious horseman who stole food and gold from the enemy, always slipping away unscathed. But when Melantha captured the MacTier warrior who was sent to kill her, the danger she faced was the desire aroused by this enigmatic stranger. . . . . . . until one man stole her heart. Roarke had known only battle for far too long. With his family gone, he had proved his loyalty to his laird in countless conflicts, fighting with the fearless arrogance of a man who had nothing to lose--and untold rewards to gain. But murdering the enchanting spitfire who had waged her own maddening war against his clan was unthinkable. Torn between fealty to his lord and the dictates of his conscience, Roarke would look for an answer in the emerald eyes of a woman who dared to show him the meaning of honor, the bonds of family--and the power of love.

Seven Sins for a Life Worth Living

by Roger Housden

"Conventional wisdom," says Roger Housden, "tells us that nobody goes to heaven for having a good time. " Seven Sins for a Life Worth Living, then, is a refreshing, liberating, and decidedly welcome dose of unconventional wisdom that awakens us to the simple delights and transformative joys of the world around us. With elegance, gentle humor, and remarkable openness, Housden takes us along as he recalls his personal journey toward an appreciation of what he calls the Seven Pleasures: The Pleasure of All Five Senses, The Pleasure of Being Foolish,The Pleasure of Not Knowing, The Pleasure of Not Being Perfect, The Pleasure of Doing Nothing Useful, The Pleasure of Being Ordinary, and The Pleasure of Coming Home. Housden writes, for instance, of submitting to the ultimate folly of falling in love, of celebrating our imperfections, of coming to understand the virtues of the Slow Food movement while enjoying an all-afternoon lunch in a small French village, and of discovering in a Saharan cave that, however extraordinary our surroundings, "we are human, a glorious nothing much to speak of"--and learning to be at peace with the notion. Such pleasures may be suspect in today's achievement-driven, tightly scheduled, relent-lessly self-improving, conspicuously consumptive culture, but surely the greater sin lies in letting them slip away moment by precious moment. "The purpose of this book," says Housden, "is to inspire you to lighten up and fall in love with the world and all that is in it. " Reading it is a pleasure indeed. "When you die,God and the angels will hold you accountablefor all the pleasures you were allowed in life that you denied yourself. " Roger Housden, author of the bestselling Ten Poems series, presents a joyously affirmative, warmly personal, and spiritually illuminating meditation on the virtues of opening ourselves up to pleasures like being foolish, not being perfect, and doing nothing useful, the pleasure of not knowing, and even (would you believe it?) the pleasure of being ordinary. From the Hardcover edition.

The Squatter and the Don

by Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton

"The Squatter and the Don,like its author, has come out a survivor," notes Ana Castillo in her Introduction. "The fact that it has resurfaced after more than a century from its original publication is a testimony to its worthiness. " Inviting comparison toUncle Tom's Cabin, María Amparo Ruiz de Burton's illuminating political novel is also an engaging historical romance. Set in San Diego shortly after the United States' annexation of California and written from the point of view of a nativeCalifornio, the story centers on two families: the Alamars of the landed Mexican gentry, and the Darrells, transplanted New Englanders-and their tumultuous struggles over property, social status, and personal integrity. This Modern Library Paperback Classic is set from the first edition of 1885. Ana Castillois a poet, essayist, and novelist whose works includethe recent poetry collectionI Ask the Impossibleand the novelPeel My Love Like an Onion. She lives in Chicago and teaches at DePaul University. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Supernatural: The Unholy Cause

by Joe Schreiber

A Supernatural novel that reveals a previously unseen adventure for the Winchester brothers, from the hit CW series!Way back in April 1862, Confederate Captain Jubal Beauchamp leads a charge across a Georgia battleground... Fast forward to 2009 and a civil war re-enactment becomes all too real. When Sam and Dean head down south to investigate they find that history has got somewhat out of hand...

The Tell-Tale Heart and Other Writings

by Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe remains the unsurpassed master of works of mystery and madness in this outstanding collection of Poe's prose and poetry are sixteen of his finest tales, including "The Tell-Tale Heart," "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Pit and the Pendulum," "William Wilson," "The Black Cat," "The Cask of Amontillado," and "Eleonora. " Here too is a major selection of what Poe characterized as the passion of his life, his poems - "The Raven," "Annabel Lee," Ulalume," "Lenore," "The Bells," and more, plus his glorious prose poem "Silence - A Fable" and only full-length novel, "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym,"

The Trail to Crazy Man

by Louis L'Amour

A word from Louis L'Amour:"Almost forty years ago, when my fiction was being published exclusively in 'pulp' western magazines, I wrote several novel-length stories, which my editors called 'magazine novels'. In creating them, I became so involved with my characters that their lives were still as much a part of me as I was of them long after the issues in which they appeared became collector's items. Pleased as I was about how I brought the characters and their adventures to life in the pages of the magazines, I still wanted the reader to know more about my people and why they did what they did. So, over the years, I revised and expanded these magazine works into fuller-length novels that I published in paperback under other titles."These particular early magazine versions of my books have long been a source of great speculation and curiosity among many of my readers, so much so of late, that I'm now pleased to collect three of them into book form for the first time."I hope you enjoy them."From the Paperback edition.

A Tramp Abroad

by Mark Twain

This book an EXACT reproduction of the original book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Treason

by Ann Coulter

"Liberals' loyalty to the United States is off-limits as a subject of political debate. Why is the relative patriotism of the two parties the only issue that is out of bounds for rational discussion?" In a stunning follow-up to her number one bestsellerSlander, leading conservative pundit Ann Coulter contends that liberals have been wrong on every foreign policy issue, from the fight against Communism at home and abroad, the Nixon and the Clinton presidencies, and the struggle with the Soviet empire right up to today's war on terrorism. "Liberals have a preternatural gift for always striking a position on the side of treason," says Coulter. "Everyone says liberals love America, too. No, they don't. " From Truman to Kennedy to Carter to Clinton, America has contained, appeased, and retreated, often sacrificing America's best interests and security. With the fate of the world in the balance, liberals should leave the defense of the nation to conservatives. Reexamining the sixty-year history of the Cold War and beyond--including the career of Senator Joseph McCarthy, the Whittaker Chambers-Alger Hiss affair, Ronald Reagan's challenge to Mikhail Gorbachev to "tear down this wall," the Gulf War, and our present war on terrorism--Coulter reveals how liberals have been horribly wrong in all their political analyses and policy prescriptions. McCarthy, exonerated by the Venona Papers if not before, was basically right about Soviet agents working for the U. S. government. Hiss turned out to be a high-ranking Soviet spy (who consulted Roosevelt at Yalta). Reagan, ridiculed throughout his presidency, ended up winning the Cold War. And George W. Bush, also an object of ridicule, has performed exceptionally in responding to America's newest threats at home and abroad. Coulter, who inSlanderexposed a liberal bias in today's media, also examines how history, especially in the latter half of the twentieth century, has been written by liberals and, therefore, distorted by their perspective. Far from being irrelevant today, her clearheaded and piercing view of what we've been through informs us perfectly for challenges today and in the future. WithSlander, Ann Coulter became the most recognized and talked-about conservative intellectual of the year. Treason, in many ways an even more controversial and prescient book, will ignite impassioned political debate at one of the most crucial moments in our history. From the Hardcover edition.

33 Questions About American History You're Not Supposed to Ask

by Thomas E. Woods Jr.

Guess what? The Indians didn't save the Pilgrims from starvation by teaching them to grow corn. Thomas Jefferson thought states' rights--an idea reviled today--were even more important than the Constitution's checks and balances. The "Wild" West was more peaceful and a lot safer than most modern cities. And the biggest scandal of the Clinton years didn't involve an intern in a blue dress. Surprised? Don't be. In America, where history is riddled with misrepresentations, misunderstandings, and flat-out lies about the people and events that have shaped the nation, there's the history you know and then there's the truth. In33 Questions About American History You're Not Supposed to Ask, Thomas E. Woods Jr. , the New York Times bestselling author ofThe Politically Incorrect Guide to American History, sets the record straight with a provocative look at the hidden truths about our nation's history--the ones that have been buried because they're too politically incorrect to discuss. Woods draws on real scholarship--as opposed to the myths, platitudes, and slogans so many other "history" books are based on--to ask and answer tough questions about American history, including: - Did the Founding Fathers support immigration? - Was the Civil War all about slavery? - Did the Framers really look to the American Indians as the model for the U. S. political system? - Was the U. S. Constitution meant to be a "living, breathing" document--and does it grant the federal government wide latitude to operateas it pleases? - Did Bill Clinton actually stop a genocide, as we're told? You'd never know it from the history that's been handed down to us, but the answer to all those questions is no. Woods's eye-opening exploration reveals how much has been whitewashed from the historical record, overlooked, and skewed beyond recognition. More informative than your last U. S. history class,33 Questions About American History You're Not Supposed to Askwill have you wondering just how much about your nation's past you haven't been told. From the Hardcover edition.

Ancient Secrets of the Fountain of Youth

by Peter Kelder

Legend has it that hidden in the remote reaches of the Himalayan mountains lies a secret that would have saved Ponce de Leon from years of fruitless searching. There, generations of Tibetan monks have passed down a series of exercises with mystical, age-reversing properties. Known as the Tibetan Rites of Rejuvenation or the Five Rites, these once-secret exercises are now available to Westerners inAncient Secret of the Fountain Of Youth. Peter Kelder's book begins with an account of his own introduction to the rites by way of Colonel Bradford, a mysterious retired British army officer who learned of the rites while journeying high up in the Himalayas. Fountain of Youththen offers practical instructions for each of the five rites, which resemble yoga postures. Taking just minutes a day to perform, the benefits for practitioners have included increased energy, weight loss, better memory, new hair growth, pain relief, better digestion, and just feeling younger.

Audition

by Barbara Walters

Young people starting out in television sometimes say to me: "I want to be you. " My stock reply is always: "Then you have to take the whole package. " And now, at last, the most important woman in the history of television journalism gives us that "whole package," in her inspiring and riveting memoir. After more than forty years of interviewing heads of state, world leaders, movie stars, criminals, murderers, inspirational figures, and celebrities of all kinds, Barbara Walters has turned her gift for examination onto herself to reveal the forces that shaped her extraordinary life. Barbara Walters's perception of the world was formed at a very early age. Her father, Lou Walters, was the owner and creative mind behind the legendary Latin Quarter nightclub, and it was his risk-taking lifestyle that made Barbara aware of the ups and downs that can occur when someone is willing to take great risks. The financial responsibility for her family, the fear, the love all played a large part in the choices she made as she grew up: the friendships she developed, the relationships she had, the marriages she tried to make work. Ultimately, thanks to her drive, combined with a decent amount of luck, she began a career in television. And what a career it has been! Against great odds, Barbara has made it to the top of a male-dominated industry. She has spent a lifetime auditioning, and this book, in some ways, is her final audition, as she fully opens up both her private and public lives. In doing so, she has given us a story that is heartbreaking and honest, surprising and fun, sometimes startling, and always fascinating. From the Trade Paperback edition.

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