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Houghton Mifflin Social Studies: United States History, Early Years

by Herman J. Viola Sarah Witham Bednarz Mark C. Schug Charles S. White Cheryl Jennings Carlos E. Cortes

This Social Studies book contains topics on: Our Land and First People, Exploration and Settlement, The English Colonies, The American Revolution, The New Nation, The Civil War, and Linking to Today.

Houghton Mifflin Social Studies: United States History (Level 5)

by Herman J. Viola Maryellen Vogt Dolores Beltran Sarah Bednarz

This book includes many features to help you be a successful reader which include comprehension support, reading skills, reading strategies and vocabulary support.

Hour of Judgment (Executioner #317)

by Don Pendleton Mike Newton

Two American missionaries are captured and ransomed in the jungles of Borneo, and the White House orders a quick and dirty rescue under the radar of the press: no political backlash, no strained relations with foreign powers. Washington views it as damage control, but for Mack Bolan, it's grim business as usual. Caught between a volatile terrorist group calling themselves the Sword of Freedom, and the brutality of the take-no-prisoners Indonesian military, Bolan faces tough odds. His biggest liability is a young Navy SEAL on a very personal mission: to find and rescue the two hostages...his parents. It's up to the Executioner to show him there are options in the law of the jungle: live or die.

Hour of the Cat

by Peter Quinn

A simple New York City homicide, indistinguishable from hundreds of others in 1938: a spinster nurse is killed in her apartment; a suspect is caught and convicted. Fintan Dunne, the P. I. lured into the case and coerced by conscience into unraveling the complex setup that has put an innocent man on death row, will soon find this to be a murder with tentacles that stretch far beyond the crime scene--to Nazi Germany, in fact. Following it to the end leads him into a murderous conspiracy of a scope that defies imagination. Grim clouds are roiling over Berlin; plans for a coup are forming among a cadre of Wehrmacht officers in Berlin. Admiral Wilhelm Canaris, head of Military Intelligence, is gripped by paralysis over the choice he must make: join the plotters in treason and violate every value he holds as an officer, or betray them to the Gestapo and forsake the country's last hope to avert utter destruction and centuries of shame. With no limits to Hitler's manic pursuit of territorial expansion, with crimes against his people lauded as a program of racial cleansing at the vanguard of the "scientific" eugenics movement launched in America and Britain, the "hour of the cat" looms when every German must make a choice. When Canaris recieves an order to assist in a sinister covert operation on foreign shores, his hour has come. Writing with masterful command of fact and fiction, Peter Quinn transports readers to a pre-war New York and Berlin brimming with atmosphere and consequence. .

House Call

by Darden North

No one would ever make the connection between the deaths: a young, attractive female nurse left brutally stabbed and floating in her bathtub and a prominent, older physician who drowns after tumbling from his deer stand. However, in his first novel, the author masterfully weaves a fabric of secret self-indulgences, reverse discrimination, diverse sexual interests, and murder, and then drapes it across a fictional southern community. Lurking on the periphery, indirectly touching nearly every colorful character in this medical thriller, is a demonic killer whose victims share the wounds of a twisted psyche. The unique qualities of this murder mystery lie in its gripping realism wrapped in intense personal tragedy. House Call appeals to men and women readers of all ages and occupations who crave fast-paced fiction ending with a surprising twist. Readers have labeled House Call a "can't-put-it-down, page-turner. " Its references to medical care situations and characters blend perfectly with the novel's depiction of emotional human drama.

A House Is Not A Home

by James Earl Hardy

Sixth in the B-Boy Blues series; African-American gay couple make their way into middle age and its struggles.

The House of Storms

by Ian R. Macleod

The acclaimed sequel to The Light Ages, Ian MacLeod's masterful steampunk fantasy returns readers to a magical-industrial alternate England, where a matriarch's lust for power threatens to unleash bloody chaos In this new age of industry, guilds reign supreme, their power dependent upon aether,a magical substance mined from the ground. Greatgrandmistress Alice Meynell rules over the Great Guild of Telegraphers with unmatched grace and ruthlessness. Yet even she is powerless to halt the disease that is destroying her son, Ralph. In desperation she looks to Einfell--a land untouched by aether's ravages and to which England's changelings have all been banished--and begs for help. Her wish is granted. Miraculously cured, Ralph finds a new life far away from the industrial clamor of London, and is made whole by the love of Marion Price, a fisherman's daughter. But the Greatgrandmistress will use every power at her disposal to thwart the couple's ambitions and love, even if it means plunging all of England into conflict.

The House of the Spirits

by Isabel Allende

""UNFORGETTABLE...It tells the story of the Trueba family, the turn of the century...The Trueba family becomes our own; their country, their continent, their tragedies are ours. Their triumphs will also be ours." - Christian Science Monitor

House Rabbit Handbook: How to Live with an Urban Rabbit

by Marinell Harriman

House Rabbit Handbook helps you set up space in your house, keep rabbits and valuables safe, house train, socialize, feed, and care for ailing rabbits. The book has lists of toxic plants, special diets, food nutritional values and medication information.

Household Politics

by Magda Fahrni

The reconstruction of Canadian society in the wake of the Second World War had an enormous impact on all aspects of public and private life. For families in Montreal, reconstruction plans included a stable home life hinged on social and economic security, female suffrage, welfare-state measures, and a reasonable cost of living. In Household Politics, Magda Fahrni examines postwar reconstruction from a variety of angles in order to fully convey its significance in the 1940s as differences of class, gender, language, religion, and region naturally produced differing perspectives.Reconstruction was not simply a matter of official policy. Although the government set many of the parameters for public debate, federal projects did not inspire a postwar consensus, and families alternatively embraced, negotiated, or opposed government plans. Through in-depth research from a wide variety of sources, Fahrni brings together family history, social history, and political history to look at a wide variety of Montreal families - French-speaking and English-speaking; Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish - making Household Politics a particularly unique and erudite study.

How Art Made the World

by Nigel Spivey

In the late nineteenth century, the first discoveries of prehistoric painting were greeted with incredulity. How could there have been such deft and skillful artists in the world over 30,000 years ago? Noted art historian Nigel Spivey begins with this puzzle to explore the record of humanity's artistic endeavors and their impact on our own development. Embarking with the motto, "Everyone is an artist," Spivey takes us on a quest to find out when and how we humans began to explore the deepest questions of life, using visual artforms. With the help of vivid color illustrations of some of the world's most moving and enduring works of art, Spivey shows how that art has been used as a means of mass persuasion, essential to the creation of hierarchical societies, and finally, the extent to which art has served as a mode of terror management in the face of our inevitable death. Packed with new insights into ancient wonders and fascinating stories from all around the globe, How Art Made the World is a compelling account of how humans made art and how art makes us human.

How Art Made the World: A Journey to the Origins of Human Creativity

by Nigel Spivey

In the late nineteenth century, the first discoveries of prehistoric painting were greeted with incredulity. How could there have been such deft and skillful artists in the world over 30,000 years ago? Noted art historian Nigel Spivey begins with this puzzle to explore the record of humanity's artistic endeavors, and their impact on our own development. How Art Made the World, in conjunction with the PBS miniseries, reveals how artists from the earliest caveman to the most studied Renaissance master have grappled with the same questions in their work: What is a man? Why must we die? Is there a God? With the help of vivid color illustrations of some of the world's most moving and enduring works of art, Spivey shows how that art has been used as a means of mass persuasion, essential to the creation of hierarchical societies, and finally, the extent to which art has served as a mode of terror management in the face of our inevitable death. Packed with new insights into ancient wonders and fascinating stories from all around the globe, How Art Made the World is a compelling account of how humans made art and how art makes us human.

How The Catholic Church Built Western Civilization

by Thomas E. Woods Jr.

Ask a college student today what he knows about the Catholic Church and his answer might come down to one word: "corruption." But that one word should be "civilization." Western civilization has given us the miracles of modern science, the wealth of free-market economics, the security of the rule of law, a unique sense of human rights and freedom, charity as a virtue, splendid art and music, a philosophy grounded in reason, and innumerable other gifts that we take for granted as the wealthiest and most powerful civilization in history. But what is the ultimate source of these gifts? Bestselling author and professor Thomas E. Woods, Jr. provides the long neglected answer: the Catholic Church. Woods's story goes far beyond the familiar tale of monks copying manuscripts and preserving the wisdom of classical antiquity. In How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization, you'll learn: · Why modern science was born in the Catholic Church · How Catholic priests developed the idea of free-market economics five hundred years before Adam Smith · How the Catholic Church invented the university · Why what you know about the Galileo affair is wrong · How Western law grew out of Church canon law · How the Church humanized the West by insisting on the sacredness of all human life No institution has done more to shape Western civilization than the two-thousand-year-old Catholic Church-and in ways that many of us have forgotten or never known. How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization is essential reading for recovering this lost truth.

How Children Learn Language

by William O'Grady

Demonstrating how children learn to produce and distinguish between sounds, and their acquisition of words and meanings, this book explains their incredible mastery of language. William O'Grady provides readers with an overview not only of the language acquisition process itself, but also of the ingenious experiments and techniques that researchers use to investigate this mysterious phenomenon.

How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food?

by Jane Yolen

These terrible lizards have correspondingly terrible table manners; they burp, hurl spaghetti, and gleefully shove green beans up a giant reptilian nostril. Subsequent scenes of dinos "sit[ting] quite still" and beaming with "smiles and goodwill" offer examples of correct behavior; but even the mealtime "don'ts" offer useful information in hand-painted labels identifying each kaleidoscopically patterned creature. Don't miss queztalcoatus screeching at a restaurant waitress, or upersaurus inspecting his nutritious supper Kids will chortle over clever images of adults dwarfed by toothy miscreants, and both parents and children will recognize the hilarious parallels with occasionally naughty human kids who loom dinosaur-large within their respective households.

How Dogs Think: Understanding the Canine Mind

by Stanley Coren

It's been said that dogs personify all the virtues of humans without the vices. Henry James wrote that his dog was "most reasonable and well-mannered" and Plato that "a dog has the soul of a philosopher." Over the years, dogs have taught us many things: loyalty, courage, and to turn around three times before lying down. Yet even in the face of millennia of evidence of thoughtful dogs, there has been little systematic scientific study until recently of what is actually going on in the dog's mind, and some people even question whether dogs have the capacity for that which we call mind. In this long-anticipated new book, written in the vein of his enormously popular The Intelligence of Dogs and How to Speak Dog, Dr. Stanley Coren looks at both the heights of intellect and the depth of our misunderstanding of what goes on in a dog's mind. A bestselling author, psychologist, and world-renowned expert on dog behavior and training, Dr. Coren is always at the forefront of discoveries about dogs. With his ever-entertaining, erudite style, he provides a fascinating picture of the way dogs interpret their world and their owners, how they solve problems, learn, and take in new information. Dr. Coren lets you see through a dog's eyes, hear through his ears, and even sense the world through a dog's nose, giving you the insight that you need to understand the silly, quirky, and apparently irrational behaviors that dogs demonstrate, as well as those stunning flashes of brilliance and creativity that they occasionally display. Along the way, How Dogs Think will answer the questions about which you have always wondered, including: Can dogs count? Do they have an appreciation of art or music? Can a dog learn how to do something by just watching another dog or even a person do it? Do dogs dream? What is the nature of dog personality? Which behaviors are prewired into your dog and which can you actually change? And, can dogs sense future earthquakes or detect cancer? With information not widely known to lay people, this lively guide also provides practical advice and wisdom that allows owners to discover the best ways to teach dogs new things, why punishment doesn't work, how a dog can actually learn to love or to fear, and how to turn that new puppy into a "perfect," emotionally sound, inquisitive, happy, and obedient dog. Combining solid science with numerous funny, informative anecdotes and firsthand observations -- all characterized by Dr. Coren's own searching intelligence and his (and sometimes his dogs') irrepressible sense of humor -- How Dogs Think shatters many common myths and misconceptions about our four-legged friends and reveals a wealth of surprises about their mental abilities and intellectual potential.

How Good Do You Want to Be? A Champion's Tips on How to Lead and Succeed at Work and in Life

by Brian Curtis Nick Saban

He guided LSU to its first football championship in forty-five years. He turned down countless offers from professional teams to stay with the job he loves. Now Nick Saban reveals the secrets that will help you lead and succeed at work and in life. Excellence doesn't happen overnight. It comes from hard work, consistency, the drive to be the best, and a passion for what you do. Few understand this better than Nick Saban, the hottest college football coach in the game. Now, in How Good Do You Want to Be?, Saban shares his winning philosophy for creating and inspiring success. In more than three decades as a player and coach, Saban has learned much about life and leadership, both on the field and off. Working alongside some of the game's legends, including Super Bowl winner Bill Belichick and coaching legend Jerry Glanville, he saw firsthand how great leaders encourage greatness in others. In this candid, insightful guide, he shares such acquired wisdom as *Organization, Organization, Organization. Create an environment where everybody knows his or her responsibilities--and each is responsible to the entire group. *Motivate to Dominate. Understand the psychology of teams and individuals, and use that knowledge to breed success. *No Other Way than Right. Practice ethics and values--and demand the same from your team. *Look in the Mirror. Maintain an understanding of who you are by knowing your strengths and your weaknesses. How Good Do You Want to Be? is more than the story of how Nick Saban motivates his staff and players to excel--it is also the memoir of one of America's most successful coaches. Filled with instructive anecdotes and illuminated by never-before-told stories of his life and career, this is a book that challenges and inspires us all to be our best.

How Lawyers Lose Their Way: A Profession Fails Its Creative Minds

by Richard Delgado Jean Stefancic

In this penetrating book, Jean Stefancic and Richard Delgado use historical investigation and critical analysis to diagnose the cause of the pervasive unhappiness among practicing lawyers. Most previous writers have blamed the high rate of burnout, depression, divorce, and drug and alcohol dependency among these highly paid professionals on the narrow specialization, long hours, and intense pressures of modern legal practice. Stefancic and Delgado argue that these professional demands are only symptoms of a deeper problem: the way lawyers are taught to think and reason. They show how legal education and practice have been rendered arid and dull by formalism, a way of thinking that values precedent and doctrine above all, exalting consistency over ambiguity, rationality over emotion, and rules over social context and narrative. Stefancic and Delgado dramatize the plight of modern lawyers by exploring the unlikely friendship between Archibald MacLeish, who gave up a successful but unsatisfying law career to pursue his literary yearnings, and Ezra Pound. Reading the forty-year correspondence between MacLeish and Pound, Stefancic and Delgado draw lessons about the difficulties of attorneys trapped in worlds that give them power, prestige, and affluence but not personal satisfaction, much less creative fulfillment. Long after Pound had embraced fascism, descended into lunacy, and been institutionalized, MacLeish took up his old mentor's cause, turning his own lack of fulfillment with the law into a meaningful crusade and ultimately securing Pound's release from St. Elizabeths Hospital. Drawing on MacLeish's story, Stefancic and Delgado contend that literature, public interest work, and critical legal theory offer tools to contemporary attorneys for finding meaning and overcoming professional dissatisfaction.

How Mrs. Claus Saved Christmas

by Jeff Guinn

In How Mrs. Claus Saved Christmas, Jeff Guinn combines solid historical fact with glorious legend to deliver another heartwarming holiday book for the whole family. It's 1620 and Mrs. Claus's dear husband is off in the New World planting the seeds of what will become a glorious Christmas tradition. Meanwhile, Mrs. Claus has chosen to stay in England, where the first signs of a dangerous threat to Yuletide cheer are in evidence. The Puritans have gained control of Parliament and appear determined to take all the fun out of Christmas. But Mrs. Claus knows that it's time for serious action when, in 1647, a law is passed by Parliament that actually punishes anyone who celebrates Christmas. Using as its springboard the actual events of a day in 1647 when ten thousand peasants marched through the streets of Canterbury demanding their right to celebrate a beloved holiday, How Mrs. Claus Saved Christmas is rich in historical detail, adventure, and plain ol' Christmas fun.

How My Private, Personal Journal Became a Bestseller

by Julia Devillers

Formerly ordinary 14-year-old Jamie Bartlett is suddenly doing interviews and book signings, flying to L.A. to hang out with celebrities, and dating the hottest guy in school. Will all the attention go to her head?

How Students Learn: History, Mathematics, and Science in the Classroom

by National Research Council of the National Academies

How do you get a fourth-grader excited about history? How do you even begin to persuade high school students that mathematical functions are relevant to their everyday lives? In this volume, practical questions that confront every classroom teacher are addressed using the latest exciting research on cognition, teaching, and learning. How Students Learn: History, Mathematics, and Science in the Classroom builds on the discoveries detailed in the bestselling How People Learn. Now, these findings are presented in a way that teachers can use immediately, to revitalize their work in the classroom for even greater effectiveness. Organized for utility, the book explores how the principles of learning can be applied in teaching history, science, and math topics at three levels: elementary, middle, and high school. Leading educators explain in detail how they developed successful curricula and teaching approaches, presenting strategies that serve as models for curriculum development and classroom instruction. Their recounting of personal teaching experiences lends strength and warmth to this volume. The book explores the importance of balancing student's knowledge of historical fact against their understanding of concepts, such as change and cause, and their skills in assessing historical accounts. It discusses how to build straightforward science experiments into true understanding of scientific principles. And it shows how to overcome the difficulties in teaching math to generate real insight and reasoning in math students. It also features illustrated suggestions for classroom activities. How Students Learn offers a highly useful blend of principle and practice. It will be important not only to teachers, administrators, curriculum designers, and teacher educators, but also to parents and the larger community concerned about children's education.

How the West Was Worn: Bustles and Buckskins on the Wild Frontier

by Chris Enss

Fashion that was in vogue in the East was highly desirable to pioneers during the frontier period of the American West. It was also extraordinarily difficult to obtain, often impractical, and sometimes the clothing was just not durable enough for the men and women who were forging new homes for themselves in the West. Full hoopskirts were of little use in a soddy on the prairie,and chaps and spurs were a vital part of the cowboy's equipment. In this book, author Chris Enss examines the fashion that shaped the frontier. Short essays; brief clips from letters, magazines, and other period sources; and period illustrations demonstrate the sometimes bizarre, often beautiful, and frequently highly inventive ways of dressing oneself in the Old West.

How to Avoid Making Art

by Julia Cameron

In How to Avoid Making Art, the bestselling author of The Artist's Way delivers a (tongue-in-cheek!) guide to doing anything and everything you possibly can to avoid making art. Anyone who is engaged in a creative pursuit will no doubt identify with these wonderful cartoons by award-winning artist Elizabeth Cameron of creative wannabes doing everything except actually getting down to work. "For most people creativity is a serious business," says Julia Cameron. "They forget the telling phrase 'the play of ideas' and think that they need to knuckle down and work more. Often, the reverse is true. They need to play. " Ultimately, the characters in this book show us how we can turn our procrastination into play and our play into great work. With this delightful volume, Julia Cameron once again hits the nail on the head on the subject of creativity. .

How to Be a Pirate (The Heroic Misadventures of Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III #2)

by Cressida Cowell

In this companion to the popular "How to Train Your Dragon," Hiccup Horrendous III is now a pirate in training with the Hairy Hooligan tribe. Witty dialogue, slapstick humor, and energetic drawings make this action-packed tale ideal for the adventurous.

How to Be a Roman Soldier

by Fiona Macdonald Nicholas J. Hewetson

Soldiers Needed! How would you like to join the Roman army?Your main duties will include: - defending the city of Rome, its empire, and its frontiers from enemy attack- marching to put down rebellions in conquered lands- digging ramparts and ditches, building forts, and constructing roads- obeying orders and fighting bravely as part of a team. Apply to the army headquarters in your provincial capital for a medical checkup and an interview.

Showing 89,926 through 89,950 of 212,073 results

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