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Zwölf Tage (Der\buchladen Ser. #2)

by Feliz Faber Isabelle Rowan

Fortsetzung zu Eine RandbemerkungWeihnachten ist für viele die Zeit der Liebe und Freude, doch für drei Männer in einem Buchladen namens Margins wird die heiße australische Weihnacht auch zu einer Zeit des Nachdenkens über das, was einst war und das, was noch kommen wird und zeigt ihnen auf, wie wichtig Heimat und Familie sind. Ihre Lebenswege führen im Buchladen zusammen, doch dabei hat jeder seine eigenen Hürden zu meistern: David fällt es schwer, mit seinem Sohn wieder eine Verbindung aufzubauen; John erfährt etwas über den Vater, der ihn verlassen hat, und Jamie macht sich darauf gefasst, Weihnachten zum ersten Mal allein verbringen zu müssen.

Zweck und Zweckfreiheit: Zum Funktionswandel der Künste im 21. Jahrhundert (Ästhetiken X.0 – Zeitgenössische Konturen ästhetischen Denkens)

by Judith Siegmund

In der Theoriegeschichte der ästhetischen Theorie hat sich im 20. Jahrhundert eine Lesart der Kantischen Analytik des Schönen herausgebildet, welche die Zweckfreiheit der Künste als Dogma ihrer Funktionslosigkeit versteht. Dem gegenüber gibt es Entwicklungen auf dem Feld der Künste, die in eine andere Richtung weisen. Das Buchprojekt geht von der impliziten Annahme aus, dass ästhetische Theorie sich ihrem Gegenstand gegenüber als angemessen erweisen muss. Es besteht daher eine Notwendigkeit, die theoretischen Parameter der Zweckfreiheit, Autonomie und Funktionslosigkeit neu zu überdenken. Die Strategie dieser Operation besteht darin, sich mit der philosophischen Geschichte des Zweckbegriffs auseinanderzusetzen und diese in ein Verhältnis zu aktuellen Diskursen und Phänomenologien der Kunst zu setzen. Auf dem Prüfstand steht damit die Funktion/Funktionslosigkeit der Kunst in der Gesellschaft sowie eine Neufassung ihrer Zwecke.

The Zurau Aphorisms of Franz Kafka

by Franz Kafka

The essential philosophical writings of one of the twentieth century's most influential writers are now gathered into a single volume with an introduction and afterword by the celebrated writer and publisher Roberto Calasso. Illness set him free to write a series of philosophical fragments: some narratives, some single images, some parables. These "aphorisms" appeared, sometimes with a few words changed, in other writings--some of them as posthumous fragments published only after Kafka's death in 1924. While working on K., his major book on Kafka, in the Bodleian Library, Roberto Calasso realized that the Zürau aphorisms, each written on a separate slip of very thin paper, numbered but unbound, represented something unique in Kafka's opus--a work whose form he had created simultaneously with its content.The notebooks, freshly translated and laid out as Kafka had intended, are a distillation of Kafka at his most powerful and enigmatic. This lost jewel provides the reader with a fresh perspective on the collective work of a genius.

Zoya

by Danielle Steel

Against the backdrop of the Russian Revolution and World War I Europe, Zoya, young cousin to the Tsar, flees St. Petersburg to Paris to find safety. Her entire world forever changed, she faces hard times and joins the Ballet Russe in Paris. And then, when life is kind to her, Zoya moves on to a new and glittering life in New York. The days of ease are all too brief as the Depression strikes, and she loses everything yet again. It is her career, and the man she meets in the course of it, which ultimately save her, as she rebuilds her life through the war years and beyond. And it is her family that comes to mean everything to her. From the roaring twenties to the 1980's, Zoya remains a rare and spirited woman whose legacy will live on.From the Paperback edition.

Zoya

by Danielle Steel

Su mundo ha cambiado para siempre, y tras pasar por terribles momentos, logra unirse al ballet ruso en París, con cuyo salario mantiene a su indómita abuela y a sí misma. El amor aparece de nuevo cuando conoce al capitán Clayton Andrews, quien, cautivado por la joven aristócrata, se la lleva a Manhattan como su prometida. Sin embargo, ninguno de los dos imagina las penurias que deberán soportar durante los años de depresión que asolan Norteamérica. A través de la historia de un siglo convulsionado y cambiante, Zoya representa una de esas mujeres singulares cuyo legado quedará por siempre entre nosotros.

Zorro

by Isabel Allende

A swashbuckling adventure story that reveals for the first time how Diego de la Vega became the masked man we all know so well "Until that moment Diego had not been conscious of his dual personality, one part Diego de la Vega, elegant, affected, hypochondriac, and the other part ElZorro, audacious, daring,playful." Born in southern California late in the eighteenth century, he is a child of two worlds. Diego de la Vega's father is an aristocratic Spanish military man turned landowner; his mother, a Shoshone -warrior. Diego learns from his maternal grandmother, White Owl, the ways of her tribe while receiving from his father lessons in the art of fencing and in cattle branding. It is here, during Diego's childhood, filled with mischief and adventure, that he witnesses the brutal injustices dealt Native Americans by European settlers and first feels the inner conflict of his heritage. At the age of sixteen, Diego is sent to Barcelona for a European education. In a country chafing under the corruption of Napoleonic rule, Diego follows the example of his celebrated fencing master and joins La Justicia, a secret underground resistance movement devoted to helping the powerless and the poor. With this tumultuous period as a backdrop, Diego falls in love, saves the persecuted, and confronts for the first time a great rival who emerges from the world of privilege. Between California and Barcelona, the New World and the Old, the persona of Zorro is formed, a great hero is born, and the legend begins. After many adventures-duels at dawn, fierce battles with pirates at sea, and impossible rescues-Diego de la Vega, a.k.a. Zorro, returns to America to reclaim the hacienda on which he was raised and to seek justice for all who cannot fight for it themselves.

Zorgamazoo

by Robert Paul Weston

Are You a Believer in Fanciful Things? In Pirates and Dragons and Creatures and Kings?<P> Then sit yourself down in a comfortable seat, with maybe some cocoa and something to eat, and I'll spin you the tale of Katrina Katrell, a girl full of courage (and daring, as well!), who down in the subway, under the ground, saw something fantastical roaming around...<P> What was it she saw? 'd rather not say. (Who's ever heard of a Zorgle, anyway?)<P> But if you are curious, clever and brave, if intrepid adventure is something you crave, then open this book and I'll leave it to you to uncover the secret of ZORGAMAZOO!<P> Join Morty the Zorgle and Katrina on a fantastically illustrated, you'll-wanna-read-every-word-aloud, sophisticated rhyming adventure for kids of all ages!

Zorba the Greek

by Nikos Kazantzakis

The classic novel, international sensation, and inspiration for the film starring Anthony Quinn explores the struggle between the aesthetic and the rational, the inner life and the life of the mind.The classic novel Zorba the Greek is the story of two men, their incredible friendship, and the importance of living life to the fullest. Zorba, a Greek working man, is a larger-than-life character, energetic and unpredictable. He accompanies the unnamed narrator to Crete to work in the narrator's lignite mine, and the pair develops a singular relationship. The two men couldn't be further apart: The narrator is cerebral, modest, and reserved; Zorba is unfettered, spirited, and beyond the reins of civility. Over the course of their journey, he becomes the narrator's greatest friend and inspiration and helps him to appreciate the joy of living. Zorba has been acclaimed as one of the most remarkable figures in literature; he is a character in the great tradition of Sinbad the Sailor, Falstaff, and Sancho Panza. He responds to all that life offers him with passion, whether he's supervising laborers at a mine, confronting mad monks in a mountain monastery, embellishing the tales of his past adventures, or making love. Zorba the Greek explores the beauty and pain of existence, inviting readers to reevaluate the most important aspects of their lives and live to the fullest.

Zora Neale Hurston's Final Decade

by Virginia Lynn Moylan

In 1948, false accusations of child molestation all but erased the reputation and career Zora Neale Hurston had worked for decades to build. Sensationalized in the profit-seeking press and relentlessly pursued by a prosecution more interested in a personal crusade than justice, the morals charge brought against her nearly drove her to suicide.But she lived on. She lived on past her accuser’s admission that he had fabricated his whole story. She lived on for another twelve years, during which time she participated in some of the most remarkable events, movements, and projects of the day.Since her death, scholars and the public have rediscovered Hurston’s work and conscientiously researched her biography. Nevertheless, the last decade of her life has remained relatively unexplored. Virginia Moylan fills in the details--investigating subjects as varied as Hurston’s reporting on the trial of Ruby McCollum (a black woman convicted of murdering her white lover), her participation in designing an "anthropologically correct" black baby doll to combat stereotypes, her impassioned and radical biography of King Herod, and her controversial objections to court-ordered desegregation.

Zora Neale Hurston on Florida Food: Recipes, Remedies & Simple Pleasures

by Fred Opie

Eatonville, Florida native Zora Neale Hurston's early twentieth-century ethnographic research and writing emphasizes the essentials of food in Florida through simple dishes and recipes. It considers foods prepared for everyday meals as well as special occasions and looks at what shaped people's eating traditions in early twentieth-century Florida. Hurston did for Florida what William Faulkner did for Mississippi--provided insight into a state's history and culture through various styles of writing. Her collected food stories, folklore and remedies, and the related recipes food professor Fred Opie pairs with them, are essential reading for those who love to cook and eat.

Zora Neale Hurston: A Life in Letters

by Carla Kaplan

"I mean to live and die by my own mind," Zora Neale Hurston told the writer Countee Cullen. Arriving in Harlem in 1925 with little more than a dollar to her name, Hurston rose to become one of the central figures of the Harlem Renaissance, only to die in obscurity. Not until the 1970s was she rediscovered by Alice Walker and other admirers. Although Hurston has entered the pantheon as one of the most influential American writers of the 20th century, the true nature of her personality has proven elusive. Now, a brilliant, complicated and utterly arresting woman emerges from this landmark book. Carla Kaplan, a noted Hurston scholar, has found hundreds of revealing, previously unpublished letters for this definitive collection; she also provides extensive and illuminating commentary on Hurston's life and work, as well as an annotated glossary of the organizations and personalities that were important to it. From her enrollment at Baltimore's Morgan Academy in 1917, to correspondence with Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Langston Hughes, Dorothy West and Alain Locke, to a final query letter to her publishers in 1959, Hurston's spirited correspondence offers an invaluable portrait of a remarkable, irrepressible talent.From the Trade Paperback edition.characters to grace American letters.

Zora and Me

by Victoria Bond T. R. Simon

A fictionalized account of Zora Neale Hurston's childhood with her best friend, Carrie, in Eatonville, Florida, as they learn about life, death, and the differences between truth, lies, and pretending. Includes an annotated bibliography of the works of Zora Neale Hurston, a short biography of the author, and a time line of important events in her life. Includes bibliographical references.

Zora and Langston: A Story Of Friendship And Betrayal

by Yuval Taylor

Zora and Langston is the dramatic and moving story of one of the most influential friendships in literature. They were best friends. They were collaborators, literary gadflies, and champions of the common people. They were the leading lights of the Harlem Renaissance. Zora Neale Hurston, the author of Their Eyes Were Watching God, and Langston Hughes, the author of “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” and “Let America Be America Again,” first met in 1925, at a great gathering of black and white literati, and they fascinated each other. They traveled together in Hurston’s dilapidated car through the rural South collecting folklore, worked on the play Mule Bone, and wrote scores of loving letters. They even had the same patron: Charlotte Osgood Mason, a wealthy white woman who insisted on being called “Godmother.” Paying them lavishly while trying to control their work, Mason may have been the spark for their bitter and passionate falling-out. Was the split inevitable when Hughes decided to be financially independent of his patron? Was Hurston jealous of the young woman employed as their typist? Or was the rupture over the authorship of Mule Bone? Yuval Taylor answers these questions while illuminating Hurston’s and Hughes’s lives, work, competitiveness, and ambition, uncovering little-known details.

ZooZical

by Marc Brown Judy Sierra

Winter weather is keeping children from visiting the zoo. So the animals are out of sorts--listless, grumpy, and no longer fun. All except two little friends, a very small hippo and a baby kangaroo. Their hip-hopping, toe-tapping, and rap-rocking soon has the other animals joining in the hip-aroo beat. "Racoons danced in pairs, baboons danced in troops, and snakes joined the dancers as live hula-hoops." Children's favorite songs get a funny new spin--seals bark out "The seals on the bus go round and round"--as the animals create their very own musical.Young readers and listeners will be amazed and delighted at how the animals chase the winter doldrums by getting along as friends, pooling their talents, and pushing themselves to new heights. After all, these are the same clever animals who learned to read in Judy Sierra's and Marc Brown's Wild About Books, an award-winning New York Times #1 bestselling picture book. ZooZical is sure to inspire some "can do" fun in kindergarten and primary grades.From the Hardcover edition.

Zooman Sam

by Lois Lowry

bookjacket Sam Krupnik has to dress up for future job day at school--but Sam doesn't want just any job in his future! Sam wants to be a zookeeper, just like Zookeeper Jake in his favorite picture book. His innovative mom and sister help him create a memorable costume which he wears ... and wears ... and wears ... long after his firefighter classmates have gone back to their blue jeans. Encouraged by Mrs. Bennett, his teacher, Sam embarks on a lengthy project to teach his preschool class about a zookeeper's responsibilities, from the feeding of cubs to the training of lions. Along the way, often painfully, he learns what the job of teacher really requires: scheduling, perseverance, tact, and the wearing of many different hats. As always, the patient and loving Krupnik family stands by as Anastasia's irrepressible little brother struggles with a set of almost impossible goals. Readers of all ages will cheer for Sam as the embroidery thread that spells ZOOMAN SAM over his heart unravels and quite surprisingly transforms him into something more wonderful than even he could have imagined.

Zoom at Sea

by Tim Wynne-Jones Eric Beddows

Zoom the cat loves water--not to drink, but to play with. <P><P>A map in the attic leads him to a beautiful woman who lives in a huge old house. <P><P>When, with the turn of a large wheel, mysterious Maria launches him on a wonderful sea voyage, the first of Zoom's amazing adventures begins. <P><P>Images and image descriptions available.

Zoom: How Everything Moves

by Bob Berman

From the speed of light to moving mountains--and everything in between--ZOOM explores how the universe and its objects move.If you sit as still as you can in a quiet room, you might be able to convince yourself that nothing is moving. But air currents are still wafting around you. Blood rushes through your veins. The atoms in your chair jiggle furiously. In fact, the planet you are sitting on is whizzing through space thirty-five times faster than the speed of sound.Natural motion dominates our lives and the intricate mechanics of the world around us. In ZOOM, Bob Berman explores how motion shapes every aspect of the universe, literally from the ground up. With an entertaining style and a gift for distilling the wondrous, Berman spans astronomy, geology, biology, meteorology, and the history of science, uncovering how clouds stay aloft, how the Earth's rotation curves a home run's flight, and why a mosquito's familiar whine resembles a telephone's dial tone.For readers who love to get smarter without realizing it, ZOOM bursts with science writing at its best.

Zoology for Kids: Understanding and Working with Animals, with 21 Activities

by Bethanie Hestermann Josh Hestermann The Kratt Brothers

An interactive introduction to working with animals Zoology for Kids invites the next generation of zoologists to discover the animal kingdom through clear, entertaining information and anecdotes, lush color photos, hands-on activities, and peer-reviewed research. Young minds are introduced to zoology as a science by discussing animals' forms, functions, and behaviors as well as the history behind zoos and aquariums. Related activities include baking edible animal cells, playing a dolphin-echolocation game, and practicing designing an exhibit. Young readers can peek into the world of zookeepers and aquarists, veterinarians, wildlife researchers, and conservationists as they "train" their friends, mold a tiger's jawbone, and perform field research in their own backyard. This engaging resource provides readers with new knowledge, a healthy respect for the animal kingdom, and the idea that they can pursue animal-related careers and make a difference to preserve and protect the natural world.

The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story (Thorndike Biography Ser. #0)

by Diane Ackerman

<P>The New York Times bestseller: a true story in which the keepers of the Warsaw Zoo saved hundreds of people from Nazi hands. After their zoo was bombed, Polish zookeepers Jan and Antonina Zabinski managed to save over three hundred people from the Nazis by hiding refugees in the empty animal cages. With animal names for these "guests," and human names for the animals, it's no wonder that the zoo's code name became "The House Under a Crazy Star." <P>Best-selling naturalist and acclaimed storyteller Diane Ackerman combines extensive research and an exuberant writing style to re-create this fascinating, true-life story--sharing Antonina's life as "the zookeeper's wife," while examining the disturbing obsessions at the core of Nazism. <P><b>Winner of the 2008 Orion Award.</b> <P><b>A New York Times Bestseller</b>

The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story (Movie Tie-in Editions #0)

by Diane Ackerman

<P>The movie The Zookeeper’s Wife, based on the New York Times bestselling book, opens March 2017. <P>1939: the Germans have invaded Poland. The keepers of the Warsaw zoo, Jan and Antonina Zabinski, survive the bombardment of the city, only to see the occupiers ruthlessly kill many of their animals. The Nazis then carry off the prized specimens to Berlin for their program to create the “purest” breeds, much as they saw themselves as the purest human race. Opposed to all the Nazis represented, the Zabinskis risked their lives by hiding Jews in the now-empty animal cages, saving as many as three hundred people from extermination. <P>Acclaimed, best-selling author Diane Ackerman, fascinated both by the Zabinskis’ courage and by Antonina’s incredible sensitivity to all living beings, tells a moving and dramatic story of the power of empathy and the strength of love. <P>A Focus Features release, it is directed by Niki Caro, written by Angela Workman.

Zoobreak (Swindle #2)

by Gordon Korman

The sequel to Gordon Korman's SWINDLE---the Man With A Plan is back! When Griffin Bing's class goes to a floating zoo, they don't expect to see animals being treated so badly. They don't expect to find Cleo, Dog Whisperer Savannah's pet monkey who's been missing for weeks. And they really don't expect to have to hide the animals once they've rescued them! Hilarity ensues as Griffin's team once more pulls off a heist . . . trying to break the animals back into a (better) zoo!

Zoobiquity: What Animals Can Teach Us About Health and the Science of Healing

by Kathryn Bowers Barbara Natterson-Horowitz

In the spring of 2005, cardiologist Barbara Natterson-Horowitz was called to consult on an unusual patient: an Emperor tamarin at the Los Angeles Zoo. While examining the tiny monkey's sick heart, she learned that wild animals can die of a form of cardiac arrest brought on by extreme emotional stress. It was a syndrome identical to a human condition but one that veterinarians called by a different name--and treated in innovative ways. This remarkable medical parallel launched Natterson-Horowitz on a journey of discovery that reshaped her entire approach to medicine. She began to search for other connections between the human and animal worlds: Do animals get breast cancer, anxiety-induced fainting spells, sexually transmitted diseases? Do they suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder, bulimia, addiction? The answers were astonishing. Dinosaurs suffered from brain cancer. Koalas catch chlamydia. Reindeer seek narcotic escape in hallucinogenic mushrooms. Stallions self-mutilate. Gorillas experience clinical depression. Joining forces with science journalist Kathryn Bowers, Natterson-Horowitz employs fascinating case studies and meticulous scholarship to present a revelatory understanding of what animals can teach us about the human body and mind. "Zoobiquity" is the term the authors have coined to refer to a new, species-spanning approach to health. Delving into evolution, anthropology, sociology, biology, veterinary science, and zoology, they break down the walls between disciplines, redefining the boundaries of medicine. Zoobiquity explores how animal and human commonality can be used to diagnose, treat, and heal patients of all species. Both authoritative and accessible, offering cutting-edge research through captivating narratives, this provocative book encourages us to see our essential connection to all living beings.

Zoo Vet: Adventures of A Wild Animal Doctor

by David Taylor

In this book, Taylor shares some of his experiences as he cares for exotic animals. Not all stories have happy endings, but all are heart-warming. This is an honest look at what it was like to be a zoo vet in the fifties and sixties.

Zoo Story

by Thomas French

"This story, told by a master teller of such things, does more than take you inside the cages, fences, and walls of a zoo. It takes you inside the human heart, and an elephant's, and a primate's, and on and on. Tom French did in this book what he always does. He took real life and wrote it down for us, with eloquence and feeling and aching detail."-Rick Bragg, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and bestselling author"An insightful and detailed look at the complex life of a zoo and its denizens, both animal and human."-Yann Martel, author of Life of Pi and Beatrice and VirgilWelcome to the savage and surprising world of Zoo Story, an unprecedented account of the secret life of a zoo and its inhabitants. Based on six years of research, the book follows a handful of unforgettable characters at Tampa's Lowry Park Zoo: an alpha chimp with a weakness for blondes, a ferocious tiger who revels in Obsession perfume, and a brilliant but tyrannical CEO known as El Diablo Blanco. The sweeping narrative takes the reader from the African savannah to the forests of Panama and deep into the inner workings of a place some describe as a sanctuary and others condemn as a prison. Zoo Story shows us how these remarkable individuals live, how some die, and what their experiences reveal about the human desire to both exalt and control nature.

Zoo Story: Life in the Garden of Captives

by Thomas French

"Animals Make Us Human" meets "An Inconvenient Truth" as a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist goes behind the scenes at one of the country's most popular--and most controversial--destinations: a zoo. This meticulously reported and smartly written book will make you think in new ways about animals, human beings, and our respective places in the world. But far from being an "issues" book, "Zoo Story" describes a time of profound drama at Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, the site of shocking and tragic events while author Tom French was there. This an unforgettable read, and every word is true.

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