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Showing 106,676 through 106,700 of 140,050 results

The Philanthropic Planning Companion

by Brian M. Sagrestano Jd Cfre Robert E. Wahlers

A donor-centered guide to charitable gift planning for fundraisers and professional advisors The Philanthropic Planning Companion compiles and analyzes the latest research on donor/client behavior, discussing the need for segmented approaches to charitable gift planning based upon the values and personal planning objectives of the donor/client. With its many tools, checklists and sample materials, it will serve as your charitable giving guide in your work with your donors/clients. Whether you are building your practice to work with high net worth clients or you are enhancing your fundraising program, this is the book you will keep close at hand. Outlines how an integrated, donor-centered, values-based, philanthropic planning approach can be implemented Explores the latest research focuses on donor behavior For fundraisers and professional advisors alike, The Philanthropic Planning Companion is the one-stop resource you′ll keep by your side to help your donors/clients meet their charitable and personal planning objectives.

The Philanthropic Revolution

by Jeremy Beer

When we talk about voluntary giving today, we usually prefer the word philanthropy to charity. Why has this terminological shift taken place? What is its philosophical significance? How did philanthropy come to acquire so much prestige--and charity come to seem so old-fashioned? Was this change contested? Does it matter?In The Philanthropic Revolution, Jeremy Beer argues that the historical displacement of charity by philanthropy represents a radical transformation of voluntary giving into a practice primarily intended to bring about social change. The consequences of this shift have included secularization, centralization, the bureaucratization of personal relations, and the devaluing of locality and place.Beer shows how the rise of "scientific charity" and the "new philanthropy" was neither wholly unchallenged nor entirely positive. He exposes the way modern philanthropy's roots are entangled with fear and loathing of the poor, anti-Catholic prejudice, militarism, messianic dreams, and the ideology of progress. And he reveals how a rejection of traditional charity has sometimes led philanthropy's proponents to champion objectionable social experiments, from the involuntary separation of thousands of children from their parents to the forced sterilizations of the eugenics movement.Beer's alternative history discloses that charity is uniquely associated with personalist goods that philanthropy largely excludes. Insofar as we value those goods, he concludes, we must look to inject the logic of charity into voluntary giving through the practice of a modified form of giving he calls "philanthrolocalism."

Philanthropy in a Flat World

by Jon Duschinsky

Open, honest, and challenging, this visionary guide looks at the forces at work in creating the global philanthropic world of tomorrow. It is a must-read for every fundraiser and nonprofit manager seeking to compete and succeed in today's "borderless" world. This compelling and practical resource reveals how your nonprofit can become more flexible, adaptable, and international in approach to help it survive the coming challenges."Jon is an inspired fundraiser: wise, inventive, energetic, irrepressible. If you want to understand philanthropy, if you want a rare glimpse into the fine art of fundraising, or if you want to be charmed out of your pocketbook for causes great and small, Jon is your man."-Stephen Lewis, Chair of the BoardStephen Lewis FoundationYou have a choice. Put your head in the sand and pretend the world is still round and suffer the consequences, or take advantage of this incredible opportunity. Philanthropy in a Flat World: Inspiration Through Globalization is your insider guide to meeting and exceeding your nonprofit's goals for decades to come.

Philanthropy in America

by Olivier Zunz

American philanthropy today expands knowledge, champions social movements, defines active citizenship, influences policymaking, and addresses humanitarian crises. How did philanthropy become such a powerful and integral force in American society? Philanthropy in America is the first book to explore in depth the twentieth-century growth of this unique phenomenon. Ranging from the influential large-scale foundations established by tycoons such as John D. Rockefeller, Sr., and the mass mobilization of small donors by the Red Cross and March of Dimes, to the recent social advocacy of individuals like Bill Gates and George Soros, respected historian Olivier Zunz chronicles the tight connections between private giving and public affairs, and shows how this union has enlarged democracy and shaped history. Zunz looks at the ways in which American philanthropy emerged not as charity work, but as an open and sometimes controversial means to foster independent investigation, problem solving, and the greater good. Andrew Carnegie supported science research and higher education, catapulting these fields to a prominent position on the world stage. In the 1950s, Howard Pew deliberately funded the young Billy Graham to counter liberal philanthropies, prefiguring the culture wars and increased philanthropic support for religious causes. And in the 1960s, the Ford Foundation supported civil rights through education, voter registration drives, and community action programs. Zunz argues that American giving allowed the country to export its ideals abroad after World War II, and he examines the federal tax policies that unified the diverse nonprofit sector. Demonstrating that America has cultivated and relied on philanthropy more than any other country, Philanthropy in America examines how giving for the betterment of all became embedded in the fabric of the nation's civic democracy.

Philanthropy in Democratic Societies: History, Institutions, Values

by Chiara Cordelli Rob Reich Lucy Bernholz

Philanthropy is everywhere. In 2013, in the United States alone, some $330 billion was recorded in giving, from large donations by the wealthy all the way down to informal giving circles. We tend to think of philanthropy as unequivocally good, but as the contributors to this book show, philanthropy is also an exercise of power. And like all forms of power, especially in a democratic society, it deserves scrutiny. Yet it rarely has been given serious attention. This book fills that gap, bringing together expert philosophers, sociologists, political scientists, historians, and legal scholars to ask fundamental and pressing questions about philanthropy's role in democratic societies. The contributors balance empirical and normative approaches, exploring both the roles philanthropy has actually played in societies and the roles it should play. They ask a multitude of questions: When is philanthropy good or bad for democracy? How does, and should, philanthropic power interact with expectations of equal citizenship and democratic political voice? What makes the exercise of philanthropic power legitimate? What forms of private activity in the public interest should democracy promote, and what forms should it resist? Examining these and many other topics, the contributors offer a vital assessment of philanthropy at a time when its power to affect public outcomes has never been greater.

Philanthropy in the World's Traditions

by Warren F. Ilchman Stanley N. Katz Edward L. Queen II

"The cross-cultural understandings this book provides can do much to help us determine the distinctive shape and form American religious philanthropy might take in the future." --Christian Century"The provocative information challenges the assumptions that philanthropy is a primarily Western or Christian tradition, and it clarifies the need for additional study." --ChoiceAn investigation of how cultures outside the Western tradition understand philanthropy and how people in these cultures attempt to realize "the good" through giving and serving. These essays study philanthropy in Buddhist, Islamic, Hindu, Jewish, and Native American religious traditions and in cultures from Latin America, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia.

Philanthropy in Transition

by Mark S. Leclair

Philanthropy in Transition examines the rising importance of new channels of giving, from purchase made from social market enterprises to social impact investing. While these movements extend the reach and appeal beyond traditional philanthropy, the result is a widening distance between donor and recipient that raises new challenges.

The Philanthropy of George Soros

by Chuck Sudetic George Soros

With an Introduction by George Soros and an Afterword by Aryeh Neier George Soros is one of the world's leading philanthropists. Over the past thirty years, he has provided more than $8 billion to his worldwide network of foundations: the Open Society Foundations, which have applied the concept of the open society, the cornerstone of Soros's thinking on democracy, freedom, and human rights, in the United States and abroad. This book, written by formerNew York Times journalist Chuck Sudetic, marks the first exploration of George Soros's innovative philanthropic strategies and unmatched commitment to building open societies in places where dictatorship and violent repression have been the rule for too long. Soros is widely lauded for his brilliant financial and economic insights and investment strategies. But his philosophy-driven philanthropy and its impact are unprecedented for a private individual, and have produced remarkable results. Soros's visionary efforts include: helping to topple communism in eastern Europe and the Soviet Union and attempting to foster civil society in China initiating and nurturing global and local organizations fighting to overcome the driver of war, repression, and corruption in oil- and blood-diamond states helping Sarajevo's people endure three years of siege during the Bosnian War fighting resistant strains of TB in Russia's jails and Lesotho's mountains before the disease can devastate the world's great cities undertaking the first attempt in history to help Europe's most downtrodden people lift themselves from poverty and segregation supporting democratic resistance in Burma and building communities in Haiti's roughest slums applying new methods for fighting poverty and drug addiction and reforming dysfunctional justice systems in Baltimore, New Orleans, and other U. S. cities. The Philanthropy of George Soros reveals the thought and practice behind a lesser-known dimension of this remarkable man's life, his goals for society, and his underlying vision for the future.

The Philanthropy Reader

by Beth Breeze Michael Moody

Philanthropy is both timeless and timely. Ancient Romans, Medieval aristocrats, and Victorian industrialists engaged in philanthropy, as do modern-day Chinese billionaires, South African activists, and Brazilian nuns. Today, philanthropic practice is evolving faster than ever before, with donors giving their time, talents, and social capital in creative new ways and in combination with their financial resources. These developments are generating complex new debates and adding new twists to enduring questions, from "why be philanthropic?" to "what does it mean to do philanthropy ‘better’?" Addressing such questions requires greater understanding of the contested purpose and diverse practice of philanthropy. With an international and interdisciplinary focus, The Philanthropy Reader serves as a one-stop resource that brings together essential and engaging extracts from key texts and major thinkers, and frames these in a way that captures the historical development, core concepts, perennial debates, global reach, and recent trends of this field. The book includes almost 100 seminal and illuminating writings about philanthropy, equipping readers with the guiding material they need to better grasp such a crucial yet complex and evolving topic. Additional readings and discussion questions also accompany the text as online supplements. This text will be essential reading for students on philanthropy courses worldwide, and will also be of interest to anyone active in the philanthropic and nonprofit sectors — from donors and grantmakers, to advisers and fundraisers.

Philanthropy Under Fire

by Howard Husock

In Philanthropy Under Fire, author Howard Husock defends the American tradition of independent philanthropy from significant political and intellectual challenges which threaten it today. Although the U.S. continues to be the most charitable nation in the world, serious efforts seek to discourage traditional, personal charitable giving by changing the tax code, and directing philanthropy toward causes chosen by government. Some voices seek to narrow the very definition of philanthropy to include only direct redistribution of income from rich to poor. In contrast, Mr. Husock broadly defends philanthropy's causes-from the food pantry to the art museum to the university science lab-as both a source of effective new ideas and as a core aspect of democracy and liberty. In a new and original argument, he asserts that having broad impact does not require a marriage of philanthropy and government. Instead, he says, private programs growing out of the values held by their leaders-and imbued with those values-can have a wide impact through their influence on society's norms. In this sense, the good that private philanthropy does for American society can far transcend the good that it does for its immediate recipients.

Philip K. Dick: The Last Interview

by Philip K. Dick David Streitfeld

Long before Ridley Scott transformed Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? into Blade Runner, Philip K. Dick was banging away at his typewriter in relative obscurity, ostracized by the literary establishment. Today he is widely considered one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. These interviews reveal a man plagued by bouts of manic paranoia and failed suicide attempts; a career fuelled by alcohol, amphetamines, and mystical inspiration; and, above all, a magnificent and generous imagination at work. Series Overview: A new series of pocket-sized interview collections, featuring conversations with some of the iconic writers and thinkers of our time.

Philip K. Dick's Electric Dreams

by Philip K. Dick

The Stories Behind the Series Though perhaps most famous as a novelist, Philip K. Dick wrote more than one hundred short stories over the course of his career, each as mind-bending and genre-defining as his longer works. Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams collects ten of the best. In “Autofac,” Dick shows us one of the earliest examples (and warnings) in science fiction of self-replicating machines. “Exhibit Piece” and “The Commuter” feature Dick exploring one of his favorite themes: the shifting nature of reality and whether it is even possible to perceive the world as it truly exists. And “The Hanging Stranger” provides a thrilling, dark political allegory as relevant today as it was when Dick wrote it at the height of the Cold War. Strange, funny, and powerful, the stories in this collection highlight a master at work, encapsulating his boundless imagination and deep understanding of the human condition.

Philip Roth: New Perspectives on an American Author

by Derek Parker Royal

From the introduction: "Each of the seventeen chapters that follow is an attempt to glimpse beneath one of Philip Roth's masks, while at the same time acknowledging the possibility of other masks layered in other reaches. The contributors vary widely in their critical perspectives, but such diversity parallels the multifaceted nature of Roth's writings. Nevertheless, all of the analyses share a common ground in their efforts to present a unique reading of one or more of Roth's works. Each chapter introduces a particular book (sometimes more than one), provides a brief summary of the text's storyline, moves on to an examination of its various literary elements (i.e., discusses basic critical issues pertaining to the plot, characters, settings, themes, symbols, points of view, and style), and then contextualizes the significance of the book within the overall body of Roth's oeuvre."

Philippa Fisher and the Dream-Maker's Daughter

by Liz Kessler

Bestselling author Kessler and Philippa Fisher are back with a sympathetic story about navigating between old friends and new, a tale full of mystery, whimsy, and the magic of friendships.

Philippa Fisher's Fairy Godsister

by Liz Kessler

Philippa Fisher tries and fails to summon a fairy, but is taken aback when Daisy, the new girl at school, announces that she is her fairy godmother - or godsister, since they are the same age.

Philippa Foot on Goodness and Virtue (Philosophers in Depth)

by John Hacker-Wright

This volume focuses on controversial issues that stem from Philippa Foot’s later writings on natural goodness which are at the center of contemporary discussions of virtue ethics. The chapters address questions about how Foot relates judgments of moral goodness to human nature, how Foot understands happiness, and addresses objections to her framework from the perspective of empirical biology. The volume will be of value to any student or scholar with an interest in virtue ethics and analytic moral philosophy.

Philippa (Friarsgate Inheritance #3

by Bertrice Small

New York Times bestselling author Bertrice Small takes us back to the sensuality, drama, and intrigue of King Henry's sixteenth-century court to tell the story of the daughter of one of her most beloved characters. The eldest child of Rosamund Bolton and heiress to the Friarsgate manor, Philippa Meredith is devastated when she discovers that the man she sought to marry has rebuffed her. But it is this sudden change of fortune that sweeps the spirited beauty back to her place in the court of Queen Katherine of Aragon-and into the arms of Crispin St. Clair, the Earl of Witton. But when Philippa stumbles onto a plot to assassinate King Henry VIII, their very love is tested as they attempt to unmask those who are plotting to tear the royal court asunder. .

Philippa Gregory's Tudor Court 6-Book Boxed Set: The Constant Princess, The Other Boleyn Girl, The Boleyn Inheritance, The Queen's Fool, The Virgin's Lover, and The Other Queen

by Philippa Gregory

The six-book bosed set of the bestselling Tudor Court novels by Philippa Gregory, #1 New York Times bestselling author and "the queen of royal fiction" (USA TODAY): The Constant Princess, The Other Boleyn Girl, The Boleyn Inheritance, The Queen's Fool, The Virgin's Lover, and The Other Queen.

Philippa Gregory's Wars of the Roses 2-Book Boxed Set

by Philippa Gregory

The Red Queen In a novel of conspiracy, passion, and coldhearted ambition, number one bestselling author Philippa Gregory has brought to life the story of a proud and determined woman who believes that she alone is destined, by her piety and lineage, to shape the course of history. In The Red Queen, Gregory illuminates the fascinating woman who founded England’s most powerful ruling line, the Tudors: Margaret Beaufort. The White Queen Elizabeth Woodville, a woman of extraordinary beauty and ambition, secretly marries the newly crowned boy king of England. While she rises to the demands of her exalted position and fights for the success of her family, her two sons become the central figures in a famous unsolved mystery that has confounded historians for centuries: the lost princes in the Tower of London. Philippa Gregory brings the artistry and intellect of a master writer and storyteller to a new era in history and begins what is sure to be another bestselling classic series.

Philippians

by Henry Blackaby

Intended as companions to the Blackaby Study Bible, these guides also stand alone as a complete study of a book of the Bible.The lessons include: Leader's Notes7 studies based on reference materials included in the Blackaby Study BibleAn explanation and interpretation of Scripture A story that illustrates the passage in focus Other Bible verses related to the theme Questions for reflection Suggestions for application in everyday life.

Philippians / Colossians: The Epistles (Thru the Bible)

by J. Vernon Mcgee

Radio messages from J. Vernon McGee delighted and enthralled listeners for years with simple, straightforward language and clear understanding of the Scripture. Now enjoy his personable, yet scholarly, style in a 60-volume set of commentaries that takes you from Genesis to Revelation with new understanding and insight. Each volume includes introductory sections, detailed outlines and a thorough, paragraph-by-paragraph discussion of the text. A great choice for pastors - and even better choice for the average Bible reader and student! Very affordable in a size that can go anywhere, it's available as a complete 60-volume series, in Old Testament or New Testament sets, or individually.

The Philippines 1941-42

by Howard Gerrard Clayton Chun

The Philippine Islands were one of two major US bases in the Pacific, the other being Pearl Harbor. The Japanese considered the capture of the Philippines crucial for its efforts to control resource-laden Southeast Asia. As opposed to its attack on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese intention was to invade and occupy the Philippines in a campaign that was to last five months. The flamboyant Douglas MacArthur, a hero of World War I and former Chief of Staff led the defense of the Philippines when the Japanese attacked on 8 December 1941. Despite warnings about the Pearl Harbor attack, the Japanese air forces caught MacArthur's aircraft on the ground resulting in half of his modern bomber and fighter aircraft destroyed. Army Air Forces B-17s attempted to bomb Formosa, but Japanese fighters eliminated them and a Japanese full-scale invasion followed days later.Japanese forces landed in northern Luzon from Formosa. B-17s and naval attacks tried in vain to stop the invasion, but failed. Poorly trained and equipped Philippine Army units could not halt the Japanese and the American and Filipino forces withdrew, even though they outnumbered the initial Japanese forces. Japanese Army units broke through several defensive lines as they drove on to Manila, which was abandoned by the Americans as Macarthur withdrew to Bataan. The Japanese gradually reduced this pocket until the only American position was Corregidor Island. MacArthur left for Australia, as a direct order from President Franklin Roosevelt and was awarded the Medal of Honor, one of the more controversial aspects of the campaign. With little hope of survival, Corregidor fell, with organized resistance ending on 9 May 1942.Although a defeat, the American and Filipino defensive efforts upset the Japanese plan for a swift victory and provided time for Australia and the United States to build up their defenses. It also gave hope to the American public that Americans could stand up to Japan, with the "Battling Bastards of Bataan" providing a source of inspiration. Unfortunately, for the survivors of the campaign, it meant a grueling three years of captivity for some. The Bataan Death March was one of the most infamous events in World War II, with Japanese forces responsible for the deaths of about 600 Americans and between 5,000-10,000 Filipino soldiers dying in the march, some summarily executed by beheading.

Phillis Wheatley Chooses Freedom: History, Poetry, and the Ideals of the American Revolution

by G.J. Barker-Benfield

The dramatic story of Phillis Wheatley, a free, black poet who resisted the pressures of arranged marriage, truly embodying the ideals of the American Revolution There is an uncomfortable paradox at the heart of the American Revolution: many of the men leading the war for independence were slave owners, contradicting the ideal of freedom that they claimed to represent. Meanwhile, abolitionist sentiments of the time contained contradictions as well. Abolitionists encouraged freed Christianized slaves to return to Africa. In this way, they hoped to send more missionaries to Africa in order to Christianize the continent and, at the same time, to send free blacks away from America. This tension is revealed through the dramatic story of Phillis Wheatley, an African-American poet who refused to marry a man she had never met and return with him to Africa as a missionary. She was enslaved in Africa as a child and transported to Boston, where she was sold to an evangelical family. Agreeing to the proposed marriage – arranged by Congregationalist minister Samuel Hopkins – would have echoed the social mores of the time, particularly those for enslaved black women. However, due to her prodigious talents as a poet, Wheatley won her freedom a year prior to Hopkins’ arrangement, allowing her to take her future into her own hands. G.J. Barker-Benfield considers Wheatley’s story and Hopkins’s plan in the broader context of the American Revolution. The ideals of the revolution motivated Hopkins and some of his contemporaries to propose freeing African slaves and thus address the “monstrous inconsistency” fundamental to the white slave owners leading the revolution. In so doing, they presented themselves as freedom fighters who resisted the threat of slavery at the hands of British tyranny. Wheatley challenged this inconsistency and, taking the revolutionaries’ rhetoric seriously, called for liberty for all human hearts: women’s and men’s, blacks’ and whites’.

Philoctetes

by Sophocles

The winner of the Festival of Dionysus in 409 BC, 'Philoctetes' describes the attempt by Neoptolemus and Odysseus to bring disabled master archer, Philoctetes, with them to Troy. The play covers several deep, contentious themes, including moral relativity, trauma, love vs. hatred, and friendship vs. enmity.

Philology of the Flesh

by John T. Hamilton

As the Christian doctrine of Incarnation asserts, “the Word became Flesh.” Yet, while this metaphor is grounded in Christian tradition, its varied functions far exceed any purely theological import. It speaks to the nature of God just as much as to the nature of language. In Philology of the Flesh, John T. Hamilton explores writing and reading practices that engage this notion in a range of poetic enterprises and theoretical reflections. By pressing the notion of philology as “love” (philia) for the “word” (logos), Hamilton’s readings investigate the breadth, depth, and limits of verbal styles that are irreducible to mere information. While a philologist of the body might understand words as corporeal vessels of core meaning, the philologist of the flesh, by focusing on the carnal qualities of language, resists taking words as mere containers. By examining a series of intellectual episodes—from the fifteenth-century Humanism of Lorenzo Valla to the poetry of Emily Dickinson, from Immanuel Kant and Johann Georg Hamann to Friedrich Nietzsche, Franz Kafka, and Paul Celan—Philology of the Flesh considers the far-reaching ramifications of the incarnational metaphor, insisting on the inseparability of form and content, an insistence that allows us to rethink our relation to the concrete languages in which we think and live.

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