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Amelia's Road

by Linda Jacobs Altman

Tired of moving around so much, Amelia, the daughter of migrant farm workers, dreams of a stable home.

Amelia's War

by Ann Rinaldi

As the Civil War rages, Amelia's Maryland town is beset by divisions. Even she and her best friend Josh disagree. Amelia vows not to take sides, until the Confederate troops march into town... led by Josh's uncle.

Amelina Carrett: Bayou Grand Coeur, Louisiana, 1870 (American Diaries)

by Kathleen Duey

Bayou Grand Coeur, Louisiana, 1863. I wonder if the Confederates think of this war as their own? Or the Yankees? Who would want a war to be their own? Amelina is frightened. She is used to being alone while her Nonc Alain is away trading, but now Yankee soldiers are so close that she can sometimes hear the rumble of gunfire. Just because her close-knit Cajun community has for the most part been uninvolved in the war doesn't mean Nonc Alain's farm would be spared if the Yankees swept through the area. When Amelina makes a startling discovery that challenges everything she's been told about the Yankees, she is forced to make her own decision about what is right and what is wrong. Can she find the courage to face the danger that her decision brings?

Amen, Amen, Amen

by Abby Sher

In this vibrant memoir, Abby Sher recounts her life with precision and humor as only a woman who is both a comedian and obsessive-compulsive can. The death of Abby's father when she is eleven years old leaves a void that she fills with rituals: washing her hands, collecting litter, kissing her father's photograph over and over. Then, with a child's understanding of cause and effect, Abby begins to pray, certain that she can prevent further disaster. She carries the weight of this belief and the accompanying devotion to God through high school, college, and beyond, when it is joined by darker compulsions of anorexia and cutting. Amen, Amen, Amen is an elegy to parents lost and to a youth consumed by grief and anxiety; it is a spiritual mystery about Abby's search for answers and someone to guide her to them; and it is a romance about discovering the true nature of unconditional love. With remarkable candor and insight, Abby offers a brave and exquisitely written account of obsessive-compulsive disorder and the bounds and boundlessness of belief.

Amen Corner

by Rick Shefchik

The body of the Masters rules committee chairman is found in the middle of the 10th fairway on the morning that Sam Skarda arrives at Augusta National Golf Club to play in his first Masters. Skarda, a 33-year-old police detective on medical leave from the Minneapolis police department, is an accomplished amateur golfer who won the U.S. Publinx and an invitation to play in the Masters while rehabbing a shooting injury suffered on the job. Evidence left at the crime scene suggests the murder might have been tied to the ongoing protest by a women's group that has been demanding that the club admit women members. Then a crusading New York Times columnist is murdered on the grounds of the club two days later. Local police suspect the murders might have been committed by a member and begin pressuring the new Augusta National president for access to the club's membership information. The club chairman asks Skarda for help finding the killer before the police thoroughly invade Augusta National's legendary privacy. Skarda looks for answers from members, veteran journalists, longtime caddies and ex-employees who may know why someone is determined to bring this year's Masters to a halt. He also falls for Caroline Rockingham, the soon-to-be ex-wife of one of the pre-tournament favorites, a former college golf teammate of Skarda's. Sam and Caroline themselves become targets as the murders continue and pressure to cancel the tournament builds. Meanwhile, the killer methodically prepares for a spectacular and deadly Sunday climax.

Amen, L.A.

by Jeff Gottesfeld Cherie Bennett

When Natalie Shelton and her family move from Minnesota to Beverly Hills, more changes than their zip code. Natalie's mom accepts a position as pastor with the Church of Beverly Hills--and Natalie's along for the ride. Before she can blink, she's living in a mansion once owned by Ricardo Montalban, going to school with hot young Hollywood stars, and partying in the park with kids who know no limits. It's an amazing new life--but if she doesn't watch out, Natalie could find herself seriously messed up. Natalie has values . . . but how long can she hold on to them?From the Trade Paperback edition.

Amenhotep III: Egypt's Radiant Pharaoh

by Arielle P. Kozloff

This book follows the life story of Amenhotep III, one of the most important rulers of ancient Egypt, from his birth and into the afterlife. Amenhotep III ruled for thirty-eight years, from ca.1391-1353 BC, during the apex of Egypt's international and artistic power. Arielle P. Kozloff situates Amenhotep in his time, chronicling not only his life but also the key political and military events that occurred during his lifetime and reign, as well as the evolution of religious rituals and the cult of the pharaoh. She further examines the art and culture of the court, including its palaces, villas, furnishings and fashions. Through the exploration of abundant evidence from the period, in the form of both textual and material culture, Kozloff richly re-creates all aspects of Egyptian civilization at the height of the Mediterranean Bronze Age.

America

by E. R. Frank

"Where would you like to be five years from now?" Dr. B. asks."Nowhere," America answers.By age fifteen, America has already been nowhere. Been nobody. Separated from his foster mother, Mrs. Harper. A runaway living for weeks in a mall, then for months in Central Park. A patient at Applegate, the residential treatment facility north of New York City. And now at Ridgeway, a hospital.America is a boy, he thinks to himself, who gets lost easy and is not worth the trouble of finding.But Dr. B. takes the trouble. With abiding care, he nudges America's story from him. An against-the-odds story about America's shattered past with his mother and brothers. About Browning, a man in Mrs. Harper's house who saves America, then betrays him. About a bighearted, hardheaded girl named Liza, and Ty and Fish and Wick and Marshall and Ernie and Tom and Dr. B. himself who care more than America does about whether he lives or dies.

America

by E. R. Frank

Teenage America, a part-black, part-white, part-anything boy who has spent many years in institutions for disturbed, antisocial behavior, tries to put pieces of his life together.

America 1844: Religious Fervor, Westward Expansion, and the Presidential Election That Transformed the Nation

by John Bicknell

The year 1844 saw a momentous presidential election, religious turmoil, westward expansion, and numerous other interwoven events that profoundly affected the U.S. as a nation. Author and journalist John Bicknell details these compelling events in this unusual history book. He explains how the election of James K. Polk assured the expansion that brought Texas, California, and Oregon into the union. This took place amidst anti-Mormon and anti-Catholic violence, the belief in the imminent second coming of Christ, the murder of Joseph Smith, Charles Goodyear's patenting of vulcanized rubber, the near-death of President John Tyler in a freak naval explosion, and much more. All of these elements illustrate the competing visions of the American future and how Polk's victory cemented the vision of a continental nation.

America 1908: The Dawn of Flight, the Race to the Pole, the Invention of the Model T, and the Making of a Modern Nation

by Jim Rasenberger

A breathtaking ride through the highs and lows of one spectacular, pivotal year in American history. As the earth turned toward the sun on the first morning of 1908, human flight remained, for most Americans, in the realm of myth and dream. But before the darkness fell on New Year's Eve at the end of the year, the Wright brothers would be worldwide celebrities, heralded as the first people in all of human history to conquer the sky. It was the year Teddy Roosevelt sent the Great White Fleet on a voyage around the globe, Robert Peary began his courageous dash to the North Pole, six automobiles left Times Square on an epic twenty-thousand-mile race to Paris, and Henry Ford introduced an oddly shaped new automobile called the Model T. It was a time of seemingly boundless innovation - everything was bigger, better, fast, and greater than ever before. In New York and Chicago, banks of high-speed elevators zipped through vertical shafts in the tallest buildings on earth. Pneumatic tubes whisked mail between far-flung post offices in minutes. Women cleaned their homes with amazing new devices called vacuums. And as American engineers cut a fifty-mile canal through the Isthmus of Panama, the very air buzzed with the imagined potential of new technology, including a "portable wireless telephone" that would someday allow people to talk while they walked. Meanwhile, the New York Giants battled the Chicago Cubs in one of the most thrilling seasons in baseball history, and a reluctant William Howard Taft was elected twenty-seventh president of the United States. By turns gripping and humorous, shocking and delightful, Jim Rasenberger's America, 1908 brings to life our nation as it was one hundred years ago, at a moment of delirious optimism and pride, a time when Americans believed that even the most intractable problems would soon be solved and that the future was bound to be better than the past. "What will the year 2008 bring us?" pondered the New York World on New Year's Day of 1908. "What marvels of development await the youth of tomorrow?" As Thomas Edison said later that year, "Anything, everything, is possible." Shedding new light on stories we thought we knew and telling fresh stories we can't believe we've never heard, American, 1908 is a rousing chronicle of a country on the brink of greatness - and a timely, thought-provoking glimpse at a younger America, even as we wonder what awaits us in the century ahead.

America 1933

by Michael Golay

The first account of the remarkable eighteen-month journey of Lorena Hickok, intimate friend of Eleanor Roosevelt, throughout the country during the worst of the Great Depression, bearing witness to the unprecedented ravages; an indelible portrait of an unprecedented crisis."All I can say is that these people have GOT to have clothing--RIGHT AWAY," Lorena Hickok wrote from drought-ravaged North Dakota in 1933. The cigar-smoking, poker-playing Hickok was the top woman news reporter of the day, and the intimate friend of Eleanor Roosevelt. Forced to abandon her thriving journalism career due to her closeness to the First Lady, Hickok was hired by FDR's right hand man Harry Hopkins to embark upon a grueling journey to the hardest hit areas across the country, during the harshest year of the Great Depression, to report back about the degree of devastation. Acclaimed historian Michael Golay draws on a trove of previously untapped original sources--including the moving and remarkably intimate almost daily letters between Hickok and Eleanor--to re-create that extraordinary journey, never before profiled. Hickok traveled almost nonstop for eighteen months, from January 1933 to August 1934--moving into the White House, to a room adjoining Eleanor's for her stays in between--driving through hellish dust storms, armed rebellion by coal workers in West Virginia, and a near revolution by Midwest farmers, writing a series of deeply empathetic and searing reports to Hopkins and letters to Eleanor that constitute an unparalleled record of the worst economic crisis ever to afflict the country, and which profoundly influenced the nature of the FDR's unprecedented relief efforts. This beautifully written account brings reveals at last Hickok's pivotal contribution, as well as shedding important new light on her intense but ill-fated relationship with Eleanor and the forces that inevitably came between them.

America Afire

by Bernard A. Weisberger

America Afire is the powerful story of the election of 1800, arguably the most important election in America's history and certainly one of the most hotly disputed. Former allies Adams and Jefferson, president versus vice president, Federalist versus Republican, squared off in a vicious contest that resulted in broken friendships, scandals, riots, slander, and jailings in the fourth presidential election under the Constitution.

America Alone: It's the End of the World as We Know It

by Mark Steyn

It's the end of the world as we know it...Someday soon, you might wake up to the call to prayer from a muezzin. Europeans already are. And liberals will still tell you that "diversity is our strength"--while Talibanic enforcers cruise Greenwich Village burning books and barber shops, the Supreme Court decides sharia law doesn't violate the "separation of church and state," and the Hollywood Left decides to give up on gay rights in favor of the much safer charms of polygamy. If you think this can't happen, you haven't been paying attention, as the hilarious, provocative, and brilliant Mark Steyn--the most popular conservative columnist in the English-speaking world--shows to devastating effect. The future, as Steyn shows, belongs to the fecund and the confident. And the Islamists are both, while the West is looking ever more like the ruins of a civilization. But America can survive, prosper, and defend its freedom only if it continues to believe in itself, in the sturdier virtues of self-reliance (not government), in the centrality of family, and in the conviction that our country really is the world's last best hope. Mark Steyn's America Alone is laugh-out-loud funny--but it will also change the way you look at the world.

America America

by Ethan Canin

It is the early 1970s; Nixon is in the White House and Corey Sifter, the young son of working-class parents, is befriended by the powerful Metarey family, whose patriarch is a kingmaker in the world of New York state politics. Corey becomes a yard-boy on the Metarey's grand estate, and soon, through the family's generosity, a student at a private boarding school. Before long, he is a confidant of the Metareys and an aide to the great New York Senator Henry Bonwiller as he runs for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States. But as the Bonwiller presidential campaign gains momentum a crime is committed, and Corey is forced to reconcile his part in a complex tangle of morality, politics, gratitude, love and loyalty. Set against the backdrop of the Vietnam War and during one of the most turbulent eras of twentieth-century US politics,America Americapossesses the mastery of pace and voice of classic American fiction. Canin has written a magnificent novel about ambition and family, politics and crime, sex and love, small-town life and big-time power - and, ultimately, how vanity, greatness and tragedy combine to change history and fate.

America and Americans and Selected Nonfiction

by Susan Shillinglaw Jackson J. Benson John Steinbeck

More than four decades after his death, John Steinbeck remains one of the nation's most beloved authors. Yet few know of his career as a journalist who covered world events from the Great Depression to Vietnam. Now, this distinctive collection offers a portrait of the artist as citizen, deeply engaged in the world around him. In addition to the complete text of Steinbeck's last published book, America and Americans, this volume brings together for the first time more than fifty of Steinbeck's finest essays and journalistic pieces on Salinas, Sag Harbor, Arthur Miller, Woody Guthrie, the Vietnam War and more. This edition is edited by Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw and Steinbeck biographer Jackson J. Benson. .

America and the Americas: The United States in the Western Hemisphere (2nd edition)

by Lester D. Langley

In this completely revised and updated edition of America and the Americas, Lester D. Langley covers the long period from the colonial era into the twenty-first century, providing an interpretive introduction to the history of U. S. relations with Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada. Langley draws on the other books in the series to provide a more richly detailed and informed account of the role and place of the United States in the hemisphere. In the process, he explains how the United States, in appropriating the values and symbolism identified with "America," has attained a special place in the minds and estimation of other hemispheric peoples. Discussing the formal structures and diplomatic postures underlying U. S. policy making, Langley examines the political, economic, and cultural currents that often have frustrated inter-American progress and accord.

America and the Pill

by Elaine Tyler May

In 1960, the FDA approved the contraceptive commonly known as "the pill. ” Advocates, developers, and manufacturers believed that the convenient new drug would put an end to unwanted pregnancy, ensure happy marriages, and even eradicate poverty. But as renowned historian Elaine Tyler May reveals inAmerica and the Pill, it was women who embraced it and created change. They used the pill to challenge the authority of doctors, pharmaceutical companies, and lawmakers. They demonstrated that the pill was about much more than family planning-it offered women control over their bodies and their lives. From little-known accounts of the early years to personal testimonies from young women today, May illuminates what the pill did and didnotachieve during its half century on the market.

America and the Vatican: Trading Information after World War II

by Robert F. Illing

The reader is given a rare view of the operations of the Vatican in the diplomatic world and some fascinating sidelights into the Vatican archives such as the role Benjamin Franklin played in the selection of the first Catholic Bishop in the United States and what the Pope actually intended to do about Henry the VIII. Robert Illing brings the reader into the fascinating and colorful political world of the Vatican, a unique entity with the dual nature of political state which functions apart from its other position as center of the Roman Catholic Church. A separate politcal state with diplomatic offices in most countries in the world, the Vatican has a unique position as a listening post unlike any other country in the world. Robert Illing brings the reader into that fascinating world.

America and Vietnam: The Elephant and the Tiger

by Albert Marrin

Examines the political history, military events, social impact, and long-term effects of the Vietnam War.

America Anonymous: Eight Addicts in Search of a Life

by Benoit Denizet-Lewis

AMERICA ANONYMOUS is the unforgettable story of eight men and women struggling with addictions. For nearly three years acclaimed journalist Benoit Denizet-Lewis immersed himself in their lives as they battled drug and alcohol abuse, overeating, and compulsive gambling and sexuality. Alternating with their stories is Denizet-Lewis's candid account of his own recovery from sexual addiction and his compelling examination of our culture of addiction, where we obsessively search for new and innovative ways to escape the reality of the present moment and make ourselves "feel better."Addiction is arguably this country's biggest public-health crisis, triggering and exacerbating many of our most pressing social problems, from crime to child abuse and neglect. But while cancer and AIDS survivors have taken to the streets and to the halls of Congress demanding to be heard, millions of addicts talk only to one another in the confines of anonymous Twelve Step meetings. Through the riveting stories in this book, Denizet-Lewis shines a spotlight on addiction and breaks through the shame and denial that still shape our understanding of it--and hamper our ability to treat it.As these eight addicts stumble, fall, and try again to make a different and better life, Denizet-Lewis records their struggles, and his own, with honesty and empathy.to make a different and better life, Denizet-Lewis records their struggles -- and his own -- with honesty and empathy.

America as Second Creation: Technology and Narratives of New Beginnings

by David E. Nye

After 1776, the former American colonies began to reimagine themselves as a unified, self-created community. Technologies had an important role in the resulting national narratives, and a few technologies assumed particular prominence. Among these were the axe, the mill, the canal, the railroad, and the irrigation dam. In this book David Nye explores the stories that clustered around these technologies. In doing so, he rediscovers an American story of origins, with America conceived as a second creation built in harmony with God's first creation. While mainstream Americans constructed technological foundation stories to explain their place in the New World, however, marginalized groups told other stories of destruction and loss. Native Americans protested the loss of their forests, fishermen resisted the construction of dams, and early environmentalists feared the exhaustionof resources. A water mill could be viewed as the kernel of a new community or as a new way to exploit labor. If passengers comprehended railways as part of a larger narrative about American expansion and progress, many farmers attacked railroad land grants. To explore these contradictions, Nye devotes alternating chapters to narratives of second creation and to narratives of those who rejected it. Nye draws on popular literature, speeches, advertisements, paintings, and many other media to create a history of American foundation stories. He shows how these stories were revised periodically, as social and economic conditions changed, without ever erasing the earlier stories entirely. The image of the isolated frontier family carving a homestead out of the wilderness with an axe persists to this day, alongside later images and narratives. In the book's conclusion, Nye considers the relation between these earlier stories and such later American developments as the conservation movement, narratives of environmental recovery, and the idealization of wilderness.

America at 1750

by Richard Hofstadter

Demonstrates how the colonies developed into the first nation created under the influences of nationalism, modern capitalism and Protestantism.From the Paperback edition.

America at Dachau

by Chaplain John G. Gaskill

Harrowing account of U.S. Army chaplain John G. Gaskill of what he witnessed in Dachau.For three months, Gaskill ministered to liberated inmates and imprisoned SS soldiers at Dachau. Every evening for a month, Gaskill and other clergymen held mass funerals for those who died from starvation and disease. Gaskill tore down and kept the German sign forbidding entry to a mass grave on a hill. He replaced it with a cross and a Jewish star. He eventually made German prisoners bury the dead in separate graves in the cemeteries in town."At incredible Dachau, Chaplain Gaskill arranged for all the multitudinous services of the Ministry and Priesthood to be performed as necessary for many denominations in many different tongues. Although much has already been written about Dachau, this article, giving the experiences and observations of Chaplain Gaskill, paints an exceptionally vivid picture and presents it in a different light.--AUBREY L. BRADFORD Colonel MC Commanding."

America at Odds (6th Edition)

by Beth Henschen Edward Sidlow

Known for its provocative and engaging issues approach, AMERICA AT ODDS, 6e, now features a groundbreaking new magazine-style format that greatly enhances its visual appeal and readability while remaining affordable and convenient. This unique text provides a memorable and effective introduction to American government by focusing on the current and historical conflicts and controversies that define America as a nation. AMERICA AT ODDS combines compelling content, innovative design elements, and powerful teaching tools to help you discover and refine your opinions through active discussion and debate of essential topics in American government and politics.

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