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Jobs That Could Kill You

by Tom Jones

Jobs That Could Kill You is a fascinating collection of candid and intimate conversations with forty-two men and women who describe in gripping detail how physical risk is a familiar companion in their working lives, and how they deal with it. In the oral history tradition of Studs Terkel, Jobs That Could Kill You will introduce you to:- Antron Brown as he launches his top fuel drag racer from zero to over 300 miles an hour in less than four seconds. - Justin McBride talking about the guts it takes to stay atop a raging 1,600-pound bull. - Jeff Gammons as he painfully remembers the terrifying screams of Hurricane Katrina drowning victims. - Cameron Begbie as he recalls fighting hand-to-hand against insurgents in Fallujah, Iraq. - Crab fisherman Matt Corriere, who describes the harrowing night when he was the sole survivor after the sinking of the fishing vessel Massacre Bay in icy Alaskan waters. - And dozens more!Jobs That Could Kill You reveals who these daring people are, what they will endure for a paycheck, and how they feel about their jobs. They speak for themselves, in their own words.

Jobs That Matter

by Heather Krasna

Empowers students, job seekers, and career changers to pinpoint the right public service careers for their interests and abilities. Readers will learn how to find great jobs in the local, state, and federal government, as well as in nonprofit or corporate organizations serving the public good.

Joe College

by Tom Perrotta

For many college students, spring break means fun and sun in Florida. For Danny, a Yale junior, it means two weeks behind the wheel of the Roach Coach, his father's lunch truck, which plies the parking lots of office parks in central New Jersey. But Danny can use the time behind the coffee urn to try and make sense of a love life that's gotten a little complicated. There's loyal and patient hometown honey Cindy and her recently dropped bombshell to contend with. And there's also lissome Polly back in New Haven--with her shifting moods, perfect thrift store dresses, and inconvenient liaison with a dashing professor. If girl problems aren't enough, there's the constant menace of the Lunch Monsters, a group of thugs who think Danny has planted the Roach Coach in their territory. Joe College is Tom Perrotta's warmest and funniest fiction yet, a comic journey into the dark side of love, higher education, and food service.

Joe DiMaggio: Young Sports Hero (Childhood of Famous Americans Series)

by Herb Dunn

A fictionalized biography of Joe DiMaggio, who was a star center fielder for fifteen years, helping the Yankees win the pennant in his rookie year. He played in ten World Series and in eleven All-Star Games. The image of American achievement and dignity, DiMaggio isn't just a sports legend, he is a true American hero.

The Joe Hill

by Joe Hill

Get four bone-chilling novels of psychological and supernatural suspense from New York Times bestselling author Joe Hill in one e-book, including: Heart-Shaped Box, 20th Century Ghosts, Horns, and NOSA2. Each publication of Hill is beautiful textured, deliciously scary, and greeted with the sort of overwhelming critical acclaim that is rare for works of skin-crawling supernatural terror. Read on if you dare to see what all the well-deserved hoopla is about.

Joe Louis: Hard Times Man

by Randy Roberts

Joe Louis defended his heavyweight boxing title an astonishing twenty-five times and reigned as world champion for more than eleven years. He got more column inches of newspaper coverage in the 1930s than FDR did. His racially and politically charged defeat of Max Schmeling in 1938 made Louis a national hero. But as important as his record is what he meant to African-Americans: at a time when the boxing ring was the only venue where black and white could meet on equal terms, Louis embodied all their hopes for dignity and equality. Through meticulous research and first-hand interviews, acclaimed historian and biographer Randy Roberts presents Louis, and his impact on sport and country, in a way never before accomplished. Roberts reveals an athlete who carefully managed his public image, and whose relationships with both the black and white communities--including his relationships with mobsters--were far more complex than the simplistic accounts of heroism and victimization that have dominated previous biographies. Richly researched and utterly captivating, this extraordinary biography presents the full range of Joe Louis's power in and out of the boxing ring.

Joe Louis, My Champion

by William Miller

An African-American boy idolizes world champion prize-fighter Joe Louis as a boxer and a role model.

Joe Montana

by Marc Appleman

A biography of the man who may be the greatest football quarterback ever to play the game.

Joe Pepper (Tales of Texas)

by Elmer Kelton

"I can't say I've wasted much time regretting the things I've done. My main regret has been over some men I didn't shoot when I had the chance." So says Joe Pepper, a Texas badman with a past. There aren't many things he hasn't done in forty years of living on both sides of the law: except face the hangman. 'Now, convicted of murder, he is about to have that privilege. But before he hangs, he wants to tell his story, to set the record straight.

Joe Steele

by Harry Turtledove

New York Times bestselling author Harry Turtledove's thought-provoking forays into the past have produced such intriguing "what-if" novels as Ruled Britannia, Days of Infamy, and Opening Atlantis. Now "the maven of alternate history" (The San Diego Union-Tribune) envisions the election of a United States President whose political power will redefine what the nation is--and what it means to be American.... President Herbert Hoover has failed America. The Great Depression that rose from the ashes of the 1929 stock market crash still casts its dark shadow over the country. Despairing and desperate, the American people hope one of the potential Democratic candidates--New York governor Franklin D. Roosevelt and California congressman Joe Steele--can get the nation on the road to recovery. But fate snatches away one hope when a mansion fire claims the life of Roosevelt, leaving the Democratic party little choice but to nominate Steele, son of a Russian immigrant laborer who identifies more with the common man than with Washington D.C.'s wealthy power brokers. Achieving a landslide victory, President Joe Steele wastes no time pushing through Congress reforms that put citizens back to work. Anyone who gets in his way is getting in the way of America, and that includes the highest in the land. Joe Steele's critics may believe the government is gaining too much control, but they tend to find themselves in work camps if they make too much noise about it. And most people welcome strong leadership, full employment, and an absence of complaining from the newspapers--especially as Hitler and Trotsky begin the kind of posturing that seems sure to drag America into war.

Joel and the Great Merlini

by Eloise Jarvis Mcgraw

By age nine, Joel has mastered all the tricks in his magic kit. Now he wants to do real magic. When he accidentally summons up a real wizard, he has the chance. How Joel learns that his own magic is the best kind, and eventually gets rid of the overzealous Merlini, makes a wonderfully wacky comedy for aspiring young tricksters.

Joe's Diner

by Gail Sattler

Christian romance

Joe's Girl

by Margaret St. George

FORTUNE COOKIEFollow Your DreamJoe Townsend had fallen in love with Molly Stevens in Mrs. Paulson's eighth-grade English class when she was the most beautiful girl in the school. Over the last fifteen years he'd watched her-in magazines and on TV-become the most beautiful woman in the world. Molly had always been a part of his fantasies-but now she was back....Joe had watched Molly live the high life-until her career went bust. She'd been "America's sweetheart," but now all he wanted her to be was "Joe's girl." But what would happen when she tired of potluck suppers and mountain nights under the stars...and the big city lights beckoned?How wrong could a fortune cookie be?

Joey and Johnny, the Ninjas: Get Mooned

by Kevin Serwacki Chris Pallace

Joey and Johnny, the Ninjas: Get Mooned is the first book in a clever, insanely funny, and highly entertaining illustrated series about two best friends and ninjas-in-training, perfect for fans of the Origami Yoda series.Joey and Johnny are best friends, but they could not be more different. Joey follows all the rules. Johnny doesn't know what rules are. Joey is strategic. Johnny leaves everything up to chance. Joey is serious. Johnny is . . . well, he carries a clown hammer and wears a dooly-bopper on his head. But there is something these two boys have in common: They are ninjas. And they're both students at Kick Foot Academy, the premier ninja school in Lemming Falls.But Kick Foot Academy's reputation is about to be put to the test. Their rivals at Red Moon Clan have mysteriously come into possession of state-of-the-art weapons--something that is totally not ninja. And now they have challenged Kick Foot Academy to a Test of Three, culminating in an epic Battle Royal. The outcome will determine which ninja school reigns supreme . . . and which shuts down forever.

Johannes Brahms

by Jan Swafford

An illuminating new biography of one of the most beloved of all composers, published on the hundredth anniversary of his death, brilliantly written by a finalist for the 1996 National Book Critics Circle Award. Johannes Brahms has consistently eluded his biographers. Throughout his life, he attempted to erase traces of himself, wanting his music to be his sole legacy. Now, in this masterful book, Jan Swafford, critically acclaimed as both biographer and composer, takes a fresh look at Brahms, giving us for the first time a fully realized portrait of the man who created the magnificent music. Brahms was a man with many friends and no intimates, who experienced triumphs few artists achieve in their lifetime. Yet he lived with a relentless loneliness and a growing fatalism about the future of music and the world. The Brahms that emerges from these pages is not the bearded eminence of previous biographies but rather a fascinating assemblage of contradictions. Brought up in poverty, he was forced to play the piano in the brothels of Hamburg, where he met with both mental and physical abuse. At the same time, he was the golden boy of his teachers, who found themselves in awe of a stupendous talent: a miraculous young composer and pianist, poised between the emotionalism of the Romantics and the rigors of the composers he worshipped--Bach, Mozart, Beethoven. In 1853, Robert Schumann proclaimed the twenty-year-old Brahms the savior of German music. Brahms spent the rest of his days trying to live up to that prophecy, ever fearful of proving unworthy of his musical inheritance. We find here more of Brahms's words, his daily life and joys and sorrows, than in any other biography. With novelistic grace, Swafford shows us a warm-blooded but guarded genius who hid behind jokes and prickliness, rudeness and intractability with his friends as well as his enemies, but who was also a witty drinking companion and a consummate careerist skillfully courting the powerful. This is a book rich in secondary characters as well, including Robert Schumann, declining into madness as he hailed the advent of a new genius; Clara Schumann, the towering pianist, tormented personality, and great love of Brahms's life; Josef Joachim, the brilliant, self-lacerating violinist; the extraordinary musical amateur Elisabet von Herzogenberg, on whose exacting criticism Brahms relied; Brahms's rival and shadow, the malevolent genius Richard Wagner; and Eduard Hanslick, enemy of Wagner and apostle of Brahms, at once the most powerful and most wrongheaded music critic of his time. Among the characters in the book are two great cities: the stolid North German harbor town of Hamburg where Johannes grew up, which later spurned him; and glittering, fickle, music-mad Vienna, where Brahms the self-proclaimed vagabond finally settled, to find his sweetest triumphs and his most bitter failures. Unique to this book is the way in which musical scholarship and biography are combined: in a style refreshingly free of pretentiousness, Jan Swafford takes us deep into the music--from the grandeur of the First Symphony and the intricacies of the chamber work to the sorrow of the German Requiem--allowing us to hear these familiar works in new and often surprising ways. This is a clear-eyed study of a remarkable man and a vivid portrait of an era in transition. Ultimately, Johannes Brahms is the story of a great, backward-looking artist who inspired musical revolutionaries of the following generations, yet who was no less a prophet of the darkness and violence of our century. A biographical masterpiece at once wholly original and definitive.From the Hardcover edition.

Johannes Cabal: The Necromancer

by Jonathan L. Howard

In this uproarious and clever debut, it's time to give the Devil his due. Johannes Cabal, a brilliant scientist and notorious snob, is single-mindedly obsessed in heart and soul with raising the dead. Well, perhaps not soul... He hastily sold his years ago in order to learn the laws of necromancy. But now, tormented by a dark secret, he travels to the fiery pits of Hell to retrieve it. Satan, who is incredibly bored these days, proposes a little wager: Johannes has one year to persuade one hundred people to sign over their souls or he will be damned forever. To make the bet even more interesting, Satan throws in that diabolical engine of deceit, seduction, and corruption known as a "traveling circus" to aid in the evil bidding. What better place exists to rob poor sad saps of their souls than the traveling carnivals historically run by hucksters and legendary con men? With little time to lose, Johannes raises a motley crew from the dead and enlists his brother, Horst, a charismatic vampire (an unfortunate side effect of Johannes's early experiments with necromancy), to be the carnival's barker. On the road through the pastoral English countryside, this team of reprobates wields their black magic with masterful ease, resulting in mayhem at every turn. Johannes may have the moral conscience of anthrax, but are his tricks sinful enough to beat the Devil at his own game? You'll never guess, and that's a promise! Brilliantly written and wickedly funny,Johannes Cabal the Necromancer combines the chills and thrills of old-fashioned gothic tales like The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, the mischievous humor of Wicked, and the sophisticated charms of Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell and spins the Faustian legend into a fresh, irreverent, and irresistible new adventure.

Johannes Vermeer (Getting to Know the World's Greatest Artists)

by Mike Venezia

A biography of Johannes Vermeer.


by John Macarthur

These study guides, part of a 16-volume set from noted Bible scholar John MacArthur, take readers on a journey through biblical texts to discover what lies beneath the surface, focusing on meaning and context, and then reflecting on the explored passage or concept. With probing questions that guide the reader toward application, as well as ample space for journaling, The MacArthur Bible Studies are an invaluable tool for Bible Students of all ages.

John A

by Richard J. Gwyn

The first full-scale biography of Canada's first prime minister in half a century by one of our best-known and most highly regarded political writers.The first volume of Richard Gwyn's definitive biography of John A. Macdonald follows his life from his birth in Scotland in 1815 to his emigration with his family to Kingston, Ontario, to his days as a young, rising lawyer, to his tragedy-ridden first marriage, to the birth of his political ambitions, to his commitment to the all-but-impossible challenge of achieving Confederation, to his presiding, with his second wife Agnes, over the first Canada Day of the new Dominion in 1867. Colourful, intensely human and with a full measure of human frailties, Macdonald was beyond question Canada's most important prime minister. This volume describes how Macdonald developed Canada's first true national political party, encompassing French and English and occupying the centre of the political spectrum. To perpetuate this party, Macdonald made systematic use of patronage to recruit talent and to bond supporters, a system of politics that continues to this day. Gwyn judges that Macdonald, if operating on a small stage, possessed political skills-of manipulation and deception as well as an extraordinary grasp of human nature-of the same calibre as the greats of his time, such as Disraeli and Lincoln. Confederation is the centerpiece here, and Gywn's commentary on Macdonald's pivotal role is original and provocative. But his most striking analysis is that the greatest accomplishment of nineteenth-century Canadians was not Confederation, but rather to decide not to become Americans. Macdonald saw Confederation as a means to an end, its purpose being to serve as a loud and clear demonstration of the existence of a national will to survive. The two threats Macdonald had to contend with were those of annexation by the United States, perhaps by force, perhaps by osmosis, and equally that Britain just might let that annexation happen to avoid a conflict with the continent's new and unbeatable power. Gwyn describes Macdonald as "Canada's first anti-American." And in pages brimming with anecdote, insight, detail and originality, he has created an indelible portrait of "the irreplaceable man,"-the man who made us."Macdonald hadn't so much created a nation as manipulated and seduced and connived and bullied it into existence against the wishes of most of its own citizens. Now that Confederation was done, Macdonald would have to do it all over again: having conjured up a child-nation he would have to nurture it through adolescence towards adulthood. How he did this is, however, another story.""He never made the least attempt to hide his "vice," unlike, say, his contemporary, William Gladstone, with his sallies across London to save prostitutes, or Mackenzie King with his crystal-ball gazing. Not only was Macdonald entirely unashamed of his behaviour, he often actually drew attention to it, as in his famous response to a heckler who accused him of being drunk at a public meeting: "Yes, but the people would prefer John A. drunk to George Brown sober." There was no hypocrisy in Macdonald's make-up, nor any fear. --from John A. MacdonaldFrom the Hardcover edition.

John Adams (The American Presidents Series)

by Arthur M. Schlesinger John P. Diggins

John Adams is overshadowed by Washington and Jefferson. Adams seemed temperamentally unsuited for the presidency. Yet in many ways he was the perfect successor to Washington in terms of ability, experience, and popularity.

John Adams: Young Revolutionary

by Jan E. Adkins

Children's biography of the second President of the United States.

John Bellairs Mystery: The Sign of the Sinister Sorcerer

by Brad Strickland

Lewis's hopes for a peaceful summer vacation are shattered as one accident after another plagues him. Is all his bad luck really just a coincidence? Or does it have something to do with the mysterious hooded figure he keeps seeing?

John Billington, Friend of Squanto

by Clyde Robert Bulla

A young Pilgrim boy is always causing trouble for Plymouth Colony until one day his mischief results in more friendly relations with the Indians.

John Bowlby - From Psychoanalysis to Ethology

by Jerome Kagan Frank C. van der Horst

This accessible book draws on unique evidence from oral histories and little-known archive material to shed new light on the working relationships which led to John Bowlby's shift from psychoanalysis to ethology as a frame of reference - and ultimately to the development of attachment theory.A unique exploration of the origins of Bowlby's ideas and the critical transformation in his thinking - offers an alternative to standard accounts of the origin of attachment theoryExplores the significance of Bowlby's influential working relationships with Robert Hinde, Harry Harlow, James Robertson and Mary AinsworthProvides students, academics, and practitioners with clear insights into the development of attachment theoryAccessible to general readers interested in psychology and psychoanalysis

Showing 88,276 through 88,300 of 138,953 results


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