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China: A Traveler's Literary Companion

by Kirk A. Denton

Whether revealing small-town superstitions or exposing Beijing’s underworld, these works of literary fiction offer insights to modern China and its myriad of social, cultural, and human concerns. An expansive country, China is made up of numerous ethnic groups with a dizzying array of local dialects and subcultures. In addition, China is experiencing staggering change, which is explored in contemporary literature. From the idyllic mountains of West Hunan to the picturesque water town of Zhejiang, from the high plateau of western Sichuan to the harsh landscape of the northeast — this compelling collection of short fiction represents the incredible diversity that is China.

China (A True Book)

by Ann Heinrichs

Ideal for today's young investigative reader, each A True Book includes lively sidebars, a glossary and index, plus a comprehensive "To Find Out More" section listing books, organizations, and Internet sites. A staple of library collections since the 1950s, the new A True Book series is the definitive nonfiction series for elementary school readers.

China Under Reform

by Zhimin Lin

In 1976, at the death of its longtime leader Mao Zedong, China was in a state of economic stagnation and social chaos. Mao's radical policies and continual political campaigns, including the disastrous Cultural Revolution, had taken a heavy toll on the Chinese people. By the end of the decade, however, a more moderate, pragmatic leadership under Deng Xiaoping had come to power and put China on a course to recovery. In the four decades since then, China's economic growth has been nothing short of amazing. China is now one of the world's leading manufacturing centers, and an estimated 400 million of its people have been lifted out of poverty. Still, problems remain. Among them are a growing gap in living standards between rural and urban areas, rampant corruption, and a repressive government that has resisted political reforms. This volume provides a comprehensive view of China's historic reforms. It not only details what has been accomplished so far, but also offers a glimpse at what the future might hold for the world's most populous nation.

China Underground

by Zachary Mexico

At the beginning of the 21st century, it is hard to imagine a place more exciting than China. Westerners hear much about China's role as the next "global superpower," but they know less about the young people who make up China's varied and fascinating subcultures.Drawn by the streets humming with the energy of constant change, Zachary Mexico, who had spent two years in China, returned there in the summer of 2006 to conduct formal research on how the changing environment has affected the Chinese of his generation. Readers are introduced to a wannabe rock star from the desert of Xinjiang, trying to make it big in Shanghai; a disillusioned journalist; a budding screenwriter; a vagabond ladies' man; a straight-A student at China's best university; a Chinese mafia kingpin; a punk band trying their best to stay relevant; a prostitute; the world's most polluted city; Beijing's drug-fueled club scene; and many others.This is an engaging firsthand account of a young American writer's encounter with the new China and the young people who are pursuing their future there. China Underground tells their stories, and some of Mexico's own.

China Wakes

by Nicholas D. Kristof Sheryl Wudunn

The definitive book on China's uneasy transformation into an economic and political superpower by two Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporters. An insightful and thought-provoking analysis of daily life in China, China Wakes is an exemplary work of reportage. 16 pages of photos.From the Trade Paperback edition.

The China War and the Third Temple

by Irvin Baxter

After one-third of the earth's population is snuffed out in a horrible holocaust, an unprecedented cry for a system of global government that can enforce peace and security will be heard around the world. The personage who will respond to a call for global leadership will be the man who has stood silently in the wings of the world stage for years -- the antichrist.

China White

by Don Pendleton

NARCO BREAKDOWN The drug syndicate running the heroin pipeline from the Golden Crescent of Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan crosses a line when it begins hijacking the narco-traffic markets controlled by Asia's Triads. When the ensuing turf war claims lives on America's streets, Mack Bolan prepares to do battle-without official sanction. The Executioner is willing to do or die to prevent a bloodbath on U.S. soil. In a retaliatory strike, Bolan hits New York's Chinatown, where a scorched earth message ignites fear and uncertainty. Exactly as planned. Now all he has to do is follow the panicked trail to the big predators across the ocean in France and Hong Kong. As his relentless pursuit puts a savage enemy on the defensive, the Executioner homes in for the kill. To cripple both factions, he must successfully play the rivals off each other. Victory means both cartels go down in flames.

China - The Whole Enchilada

by Mark Brown

3m / Musical Comedy / A hilarious new musical, China - The Whole Enchilada is three men singing, dancing, and irreverently marching their way through four thousand years of Chinese history- in less than two hours with an intermission. The show dares to tackle racism, human rights, genocide, and the birth of the fortune cookie. / Selected participant of the 2008 New York International Fringe Festival. / "Sublimely silly! I found myself grinning, if not outright laughing through most of the goofy shenanigans," - Houston Press

Chinaberry

by William Lavender

The romance of GONE WITH THE WIND ... the sweep of BEULAH LAND ... the frankness of MANDINGO ... a sprawling plantation on the Mississippi... lush with prosperity... grand in hospitality... smouldering with forbidden desire and scandalous family secrets ... until the night of the party, the night the master's daughter is discovered out back with her personal slave boy. After that, CHINABERRY is never the same! Here is a saga of the old South in all its splendor and decadence ... of a plantation rent by its loves and hates, ravaged by civil war and bloodthirsty vengeance, reborn in a bleak aftermath ... but mostly of the people, white and black, who intermingled in one generation's shame and another's daring, tied forever to each other--and to ... Chinaberry.

Chinaberry Sidewalks

by Rodney Crowell

From the acclaimed musician comes a tender, surprising, and often uproarious memoir about his dirt-poor southeast Texas boyhood. The only child of a hard-drinking father and a Holy Roller mother, Rodney Crowell was no stranger to bombast from an early age, whether knock-down-drag-outs at a local dive bar or fire-and-brimstone sermons at Pentecostal tent revivals. He was an expert at reading his father's mercurial moods and gauging exactly when his mother was likely to erupt, and even before he learned to ride a bike, he was often forced to take matters into his own hands. He broke up his parents' raucous New Year's Eve party with gunfire and ended their slugfest at the local drive-in (actual restaurants weren't on the Crowells' menu) by smashing a glass pop bottle over his own head. Despite the violent undercurrents always threatening to burst to the surface, he fiercely loved his epilepsy-racked mother, who scorned boring preachers and improvised wildly when the bills went unpaid. And he idolized his blustering father, a honky-tonk man who took his boy to see Hank Williams, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, and Johnny Cash perform live, and bought him a drum set so he could join his band at age eleven. Shot through with raggedy friends and their neighborhood capers, hilariously awkward adolescent angst, and an indelible depiction of the bloodlines Crowell came from, Chinaberry Sidewalks also vividly re-creates Houston in the fifties: a rough frontier town where icehouses sold beer by the gallon on paydays; teeming with musical venues from standard roadhouses to the Magnolia Gardens, where name-brand stars brought glamour to a place starved for it; filling up with cheap subdivisions where blue-collar day laborers could finally afford a house of their own; a place where apocalyptic hurricanes and pest infestations were nearly routine. But at its heart this is Crowell's tribute to his parents and an exploration of their troubled yet ultimately redeeming romance. Wry, clear-eyed, and generous, it is, like the very best memoirs, firmly rooted in time and place and station, never dismissive, and truly fulfilling.

The Chinaman

by Friedrich Glauser Mike Mitchell

"After reading Friedrich Glauser's dark tour de force In Matto's Realm, it's easy to see why the German equivalent of the Edgar Allan Poe Award is dubbed 'The Glauser.'"--The Washington PostPraise for the Sergeant Studer series:"Thumbprint is a fine example of the craft of detective writing in a period which fans will regard as the golden age of crime fiction."--The Sunday Telegraph"In Matto's Realm is a gem that contains echoes of Dürrenmatt, Fritz Lang's film M and Thomas Mann's The Magic Mountain. Both a compelling mystery and an illuminating, finely wrought mainstream novel."--Publishers WeeklyWhen, in later years, Sergeant Studer told the story of the Chinaman, he called it the story of three places, as the case unfolded in a Swiss country inn, in a poorhouse, and in a horticultural college. Three places and two murders. Anna Hungerlott, supposedly dead from gastric influenza, left behind handkerchiefs with traces of arsenic. One foggy November morning the enigmatic James Farny, nicknamed the Chinaman by Studer, was found lying on Anna's grave. Murdered, a single pistol shot to the heart that did not pierce his clothing. This is the fourth in the Sergeant Studer series. Friedrich Glauser is a legendary figure in European crime writing. He was a morphine and opium addict much of his life and began writing crime novels while an inmate of the Swiss asylum for the insane at Waldau.

Chinaman's Chance: A Novel

by Ross Thomas

This book introduces Artie Wu, Pretender to the throne of China. Wu claims to be the illegitimate son of the illegitimate daughter of the Boy-Emperor, who is also remembered as P'u Yi.

A Chinaman's Chance: One Family's Journey and the Chinese American Dream

by Eric Liu

From Tony Hsieh to Amy Chua to Jeremy Lin, Chinese Americans are now arriving at the highest levels of American business, civic life, and culture. But what makes this story of immigrant ascent unique is that Chinese Americans are emerging at just the same moment when China has emerged - and indeed may displace America - at the center of the global scene. What does it mean to be Chinese American in this moment? And how does exploring that question alter our notions of just what an American is and will be? In many ways, Chinese Americans today are exemplars of the American Dream: during a crowded century and a half, this community has gone from indentured servitude, second-class status and outright exclusion to economic and social integration and achievement. But this narrative obscures too much: the Chinese Americans still left behind, the erosion of the American Dream in general, the emergence--perhaps--of a Chinese Dream, and how other Americans will look at their countrymen of Chinese descent if China and America ever become adversaries. As Chinese Americans reconcile competing beliefs about what constitutes success, virtue, power, and purpose, they hold a mirror up to their country in a time of deep flux. In searching, often personal essays that range from the meaning of Confucius to the role of Chinese Americans in shaping how we read the Constitution to why he hates the hyphen in "Chinese-American," Eric Liu pieces together a sense of the Chinese American identity in these auspicious years for both countries. He considers his own public career in American media and government; his daughter's efforts to hold and release aspects of her Chinese inheritance; and the still-recent history that made anyone Chinese in America seem foreign and disloyal until proven otherwise. Provocative, often playful but always thoughtful, Liu breaks down his vast subject into bite-sized chunks, along the way providing insights into universal matters: identity, nationalism, family, and more.

China's Ascent: Power, Security, and the Future of International Politics

by Robert S. Ross Zhu Feng

Assessments of China's importance on the world stage usually focus on a single dimension of China's increasing power, rather than on the multiple sources of China's rise, including its economic might and the continuing modernization of its military. This book offers multiple analytical perspectives--constructivist, liberal, neorealist--on the significance of the many dimensions of China's regional and global influence. Distinguished authors consider the likelihood of conflict and peaceful accommodation as China grows ever stronger. They look at the changing position of China "from the inside": How do Chinese policymakers evaluate the contemporary international order and what are the regional and global implications of that worldview? The authors also address the implications of China's increasing power for Chinese policymaking and for the foreign policies of Korea, Japan, and the United States. Contributors: Robert Art, Brandeis University; Avery Goldstein, University of Pennsylvania; G. John Ikenberry, Princeton University; Byung-Kook Kim, Korea University; Jonathan Kirshner, Cornell University; Jeffrey W. Legro, University of Virginia; Jack S. Levy, Rutgers University; Qin Yaqing, China Foreign Affairs University; Robert S. Ross, Boston College; Akio Takahara, University of Tokyo; Tang Shiping, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; Wei Ling, China Foreign Affairs University; Zhu Feng, Peking University

China's Avant-Garde Fiction: An Anthology

by Jing Wang

Filled with mirages, hallucinations, myths, mental puzzles, and the fantastic, the contemporary experimental fiction of the Chinese avant-garde represents a genre of storytelling unlike any other. Whether engaging the worn spectacle of history, expressing seemingly unmotivated violence, or reinventing outlandish Tibetan myths, these stories are defined by their devotion to theatrics and their willful apathy toward everything held sacred by the generation that witnessed the Cultural Revolution. Jing Wang has selected provocative examples of this new school of writing, which gained prominence in the late 1980s. Contradicting many long-cherished beliefs about Chinese writers--including the alleged tradition of writing as a political act against authoritarianism--these stories make a dramatic break from conventions of modern Chinese literature by demonstrating an irreverence toward history and culture and by celebrating the artificiality of storytelling. Enriched by the work of a distinguished group of translators, this collection presents an aesthetic experience that may have outraged many revolutionary-minded readers in China, but one that also occupies an important place in the canon of Chinese literature. China's Avant-Garde Fiction brings together a group of exceptional writers (including Raise the Red Lantern author Su Tong) to the attention of an English-speaking audience. This book will be enjoyed by those interested in Chinese literature, culture, and society--particularly readers of contemporary fiction. Contributors. Bei Cun, Can Xue, Gei Fei, Ma Yuan, Su Tong, Sun Ganlu, Yu Hua Translators. Eva Shan Chou, Michael S. Duke, Howard Goldblatt, Ronald R. Janssen, Andrew F. Jones, Denis C. Mair, Victor H. Mair, Caroline Mason, Beatrice Spade, Kristina M. Torgeson, Jian Zhang, Zhu Hong

China's Bravest Girl: The Legend of Hua Mu Lan

by Charlie Chin

The story of Hua Mu Lan, a girl who, disguised as a man, went to war in place of her elderly father.

China’s Crony Capitalism

by Minxin Pei

China's efforts to modernize yielded a kleptocracy characterized by corruption, wealth inequality, and social tensions. Rejecting conventional platitudes about the resilience of Party rule, Minxin Pei gathers unambiguous evidence that beneath China's facade of ever-expanding prosperity and power lies a Leninist state in an advanced stage of decay.

China's Democratic Future: How It Will Happen and Where It Will Lead

by Bruce Gilley

An eminent China expert considers how the Chinese Communist Party will be removed from power and democratic transition will take place.

China's Economic Gene Mutations

by Ning Zhang Jian Zhang Zhaoguang Hu

The book focuses on low-carbon issues and China's economy, which is analyzed from the perspective of electricity economics. It proposes the novel concept of an "economic gene" to reflect certain characteristics of the economy. The gene mapping of China's economy has been studied based on production functions with electricity. Economic mutations have also been studied with the aim of diagnosing problems in the economy. Two such mutations have occurred in China since 1978, the most recent being in 2012 and no further mutation is expected until 2025. The book describes the inherent quality of China's economy from 2012 to 2025, and how mechanism reforms would greatly improve marginal representative factor productivity in this period. The agents response equilibrium (ARE) approach to simulate national economy, based on multi-agent technology is proposed. Another cornerstone of the model is the input-output table. Simulated input-output tables from 2011 to 2025 are provided in the book. This book provides recommendations for policy makers and advisors, and is a valuable resource for researchers in the fields of economics, public policies, low-carbon development, electricity and energy. It also provides insights into China's economic development.

China’s Energy Economy

by Les Oxley Hengyun Ma

In the new millennium, understanding China's energy economy is crucial for politicians, businesspeople and energy economists, as China's energy policy choices will mean both challenges and opportunities for the world in terms of an increasing share of primary energy consumption and investment. This book initially reviews the literature on China's energy economy and in so doing reveals that many important areas have been overlooked or are outdated in their coverage. Given the size of China and its global importance, the book then review s China's current energy situation and fills the gaps in the literature for those who are interested in and concerned about China's economic development and energy reform in the new millennium. The book is different from previous studies in several important ways: Firstly, it presents recent, pioneering research rather than a simple textbook, several sections of which have been published in high-quality energy journals. Secondly, the book first subdivides China's energy intensity change into aspects of budget constraint, technological change, factor substitution, energy demand and economic growth using a newly developed econometric approach. Thirdly, it provides many new and different econometric findings and derives many new policy implications for China's energy economy. And lastly, it brings to light a wealth of new knowledge for those who are interested in China's energy economy, the world energy market and global environmental and climate change issues.

China's Financial Transition at a Crossroads

by Charles W Calomiris

China's increasing role in global economic affairs has placed the country at a crossroads: how many and what types of international capital-market transactions will China permit? How will China's financial system change internally? What kind of relationships will the Chinese government develop with foreign financial institutions, especially with those based in the United States? Can China broker a sustainable partnership with America that will avoid sending economic shock waves throughout the world?Drawing on the contemporary research of prominent international scholars, the experts in this volume outline the trajectory of China's financial markets since the advent of reform and anticipate their uncertain future. Chapter authors and commentators include Geert Bekaert, Loren Brandt, Lee Branstetter, Mary Wadsworth Darby, Michael DeStefano, Barry Eichengreen, Campbell Harvey, Fred Hu, Xiaobo Lu, Christian Lundblad, Ailsa Roell, Daniel Rosen, Shang-Jin Wei, Jialin Yu, and Xiaodong Zhu.The book begins with an overview of the history of financial-sector development, regulation, and performance and then focuses on the banking sector, discussing the progress, challenges, and prospects of current sector reform. Subsequent chapters describe the role of foreign capital in China's development and analyze the changes in capital flows and controls over time; explore various explanations for China's composition of foreign-capital and foreign-exchange policies, particularly the factors shaping China's reliance on foreign direct investment; and provide an international, comparative perspective on the remarkable growth experience of China and the contribution of its institutional environment to that experience.Contributors dispute the belief that stock market listing has done little to reform state-owned enterprises and take a hard look at the exchange rate regime choice for China, considering the potential long-run desirability of flexibility and the appropriate sequencing of reforms in foreign-exchange policy, domestic banking reform, and capital-market openness. The book concludes with a roundtable discussion in which prominent economists, including Peter Garber, Robert Hodrick, John Makin, David Malpass, Frederic Mishkin, and Eswar Prasad, debate the pace of the appreciation of China's currency and the likely consequences of that policy within and outside of China.

China's Future

by David Shambaugh

China's future is arguably the most consequential question in global affairs. Having enjoyed unprecedented levels of growth, China is at a critical juncture in the development of its economy, society, polity, national security, and international relations. The direction the nation takes at this turning point will determine whether it stalls or continues to develop and prosper. Will China be successful in implementing a new wave of transformational reforms that could last decades and make it the world's leading superpower? Or will its leaders shy away from the drastic changes required because the regime's power is at risk? If so, will that lead to prolonged stagnation or even regime collapse? Might China move down a more liberal or even democratic path? Or will China instead emerge as a hard, authoritarian and aggressive superstate? In this new book, David Shambaugh argues that these potential pathways are all possibilities - but they depend on key decisions yet to be made by China's leaders, different pressures from within Chinese society, as well as actions taken by other nations. Assessing these scenarios and their implications, he offers a thoughtful and clear study of China's future for all those seeking to understand the country's likely trajectory over the coming decade and beyond.

China's Growing Role in World Trade

by Robert C. Feenstra Shang-Jin Wei

In less than three decades, China has grown from playing a negligible role in world trade to being one of the world's largest exporters, a substantial importer of raw materials, intermediate outputs, and other goods, and both a recipient and source of foreign investment. Not surprisingly, China's economic dynamism has generated considerable attention and concern in the United States and beyond. While some analysts have warned of the potential pitfalls of China's rise--the loss of jobs, for example--others have highlighted the benefits of less expensive goods and services purchased by U.S. consumers along with new market and investment opportunities for U.S. firms. Bringing together an expert group of contributors, China's Growing Role in World Trade undertakes an empirical investigation of the effects of China's new status. The essays collected here provide detailed analyses of the microstructure of trade, the macroeconomic implications, sector-level issues, and foreign direct investment. This volume's careful examination of micro data in light of established economic theories clarifies a number of misconceptions, overturns some conventional wisdom, and documents data patterns that enhance our understanding of issues related to China's trade.

China's Hegemony: Four Hundred Years of East Asian Domination

by Ji-Young Lee

Watching China's growing power and international prominence today, many have invoked China's imperial past to project Asia's future dominated by China. China's Hegemony shows that the Chinese-centered international order in Asia's past was not as Sinocentric as conventional wisdom suggests. Instead, throughout the early modern period, Chinese hegemony was accepted, defied, and challenged by its East Asian neighbors at different times, depending on these leaders' strategies for legitimacy among their own populations. This book demonstrates that Chinese hegemony and hierarchy were not an outcome of just China's military power or Confucian culture but were constructed while interacting with other, less powerful actors' domestic political needs.Focusing on China-Korea-Japan dynamics of East Asian international politics during the Ming and High Qing periods, Lee draws on extensive research of East Asian language documents, including records written by Chinese and Korean envoys. The book offers fascinating and rich details of war and peace in Asian international relations, addressing questions such as: why Japan invaded Korea and fought a war against Sino-Korean coalition in the late sixteenth century; why Korea attempted to strike at the Ming empire militarily in the late fourteenth century; and how Japan created a miniature international order posing as the center of Asia in lieu of the Qing empire in the seventeenth century. By answering these questions, Lee's in-depth study speaks directly to general international relations literature and concludes that hegemony in Asia is a domestic as well as international phenomenon with implications for the contemporary era.

China's Hidden Children: Abandonment, Adoption, and the Human Costs of the One-Child Policy

by Kay Ann Johnson

In the thirty-five years since China instituted its One-Child Policy, 120,000 children--mostly girls--have left China through international adoption, including 85,000 to the United States. It's generally assumed that this diaspora is the result of China's approach to population control, but there is also the underlying belief that the majority of adoptees are daughters because the One-Child Policy often collides with the traditional preference for a son. While there is some truth to this, it does not tell the full story--a story with deep personal resonance to Kay Ann Johnson, a China scholar and mother to an adopted Chinese daughter. Johnson spent years talking with the Chinese parents driven to relinquish their daughters during the brutal birth-planning campaigns of the 1990s and early 2000s, and, with China's Hidden Children, she paints a startlingly different picture. The decision to give up a daughter, she shows, is not a facile one, but one almost always fraught with grief and dictated by fear. Were it not for the constant threat of punishment for breaching the country's stringent birth-planning policies, most Chinese parents would have raised their daughters despite the cultural preference for sons. With clear understanding and compassion for the families, Johnson describes their desperate efforts to conceal the birth of second or third daughters from the authorities. As the Chinese government cracked down on those caught concealing an out-of-plan child, strategies for surrendering children changed--from arranging adoptions or sending them to live with rural family to secret placement at carefully chosen doorsteps and, finally, abandonment in public places. In the twenty-first century, China's so-called abandoned children have increasingly become "stolen" children, as declining fertility rates have left the dwindling number of children available for adoption more vulnerable to child trafficking. In addition, government seizures of locally--but illegally--adopted children and children hidden within their birth families mean that even legal adopters have unknowingly adopted children taken from parents and sent to orphanages. The image of the "unwanted daughter" remains commonplace in Western conceptions of China. With China's Hidden Children, Johnson reveals the complex web of love, secrecy, and pain woven in the coerced decision to give one's child up for adoption and the profound negative impact China's birth-planning campaigns have on Chinese families.

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