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Foundations of Economics: A Beginner's Companion

by Yanis Varoufakis

Foundations of Economics breathes life into the discipline by linking key economic concepts with wider debates and issues. By bringing to light delightful mind-teasers, philosophical questions and intriguing politics in mainstream economics, it promises to enliven an otherwise dry course whilst inspiring students to do well.The book covers all the main economic concepts and addresses in detail three main areas:* consumption and choice* production and markets* government and the State.Each is discussed in terms of what the conventional textbook says, how these ideas developed in historical and philosophical terms and whether or not they make sense. Assumptions about economics as a discipline are challenged, and several pertinent students' anxieties ('Should I be studying economics?') are discussed.

The French Revolution

by Jocelyn Hunt

In the French Revolution, Jocelyn Hunt examines the major issues and background to the revolution, including its causes, and disputes as to when it ended. The author also surveys the views of historians on this period and looks at wider questions such as the nature of revolution.Beginning with the pre-revolution economic and political situation, and covering through to the fall of Robespierre and the rise of Bonaparte, this book provides both challenging analysis and a concise introduction.

Second Language Learning and Language Teaching: Fifth Edition

by Vivian Cook

Second Language Learning and Language Teaching provides an introduction to the application of second language acquisition research to language teaching. Assuming no previous background in second language acquisition or language teaching methods, this text starts by introducing readers to the basic issues of second language acquisition research. It then examines how people learn particular aspects of the second language, such as grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation and the writing system, and at the strategies they adopt in their learning and the differences between individuals. Final chapters look at second language learning in a broader context – the goals of language teaching and how teaching methods relate to SLA research. This newly updated fifth edition builds on the comprehensive scope of earlier editions while also addressing more recent developments in the field, particularly multilingual approaches to language teaching.

Using Psychology in Management Training: The Psychological Foundations of Management Skills

by David A. Statt

Many of the fundamental principles of psychology form the basis for management training.Using Psychology in Management Training aims to give trainers and student trainers a grounding in the ideas and research findings which are most relevant to their work.Three major areas are explored from a management training perspective and illustrated with examples* the individual psychological processes of learning, personality and motivation which are at the heart of most management training courses* the social psychological processes of group dynamics, leadership and stress which all arise from the interaction of people at work* the psychology of the actual training experience including the crucial training skill of communication and what is needed to meet organisational training needsUsing Psychology in Management Training has a clear and accessible format with a comprehensive glossary of unfamiliar terms and suggestions for further reading at the end of each chapter.

Comics and the Senses: A Multisensory Approach to Comics and Graphic Novels (Routledge Research in Cultural and Media Studies)

by Ian Hague

Attempts to define what comics are and explain how they work have not always been successful because they are premised upon the idea that comic strips, comic books and graphic novels are inherently and almost exclusively visual. This book challenges that premise, and asserts that comics is not just a visual medium. The book outlines the multisensory aspects of comics: the visual, audible, tactile, olfactory and gustatory elements of the medium. It rejects a synaesthetic approach (by which all the senses are engaged through visual stimuli) and instead argues for a truly multisensory model by which the direct stimulation of the reader’s physical senses can be understood. A wide range of examples demonstrates how multisensory communication systems work in both commercial and more experimental contexts. The book concludes with a case study that looks at the works of Alan Moore and indicates areas of interest that multisensory analysis can draw out, but which are overlooked by more conventional approaches.

The Memory of Sound: Preserving the Sonic Past (Routledge Research in Cultural and Media Studies)

by Seán Street

This book explores the connections between sound and memory across all electronic media, with a particular focus on radio. Street explores our capacity to remember through sound and how we can help ourselves preserve a sense of self through the continuity of memory. In so doing, he analyzes how the brain is triggered by the memory of programs, songs, and individual sounds. He then examines the growing importance of sound archives, community radio and current research using GPS technology for the history of place, as well as the potential for developing strategies to aid Alzheimer's and dementia patients through audio memory.

Urban Forests, Trees, and Greenspace: A Political Ecology Perspective (Routledge Studies in Urban Ecology)

by L. Anders Sandberg Adrina Bardekjian Sadia Butt

Urban forests, trees and greenspace are critical in contemporary planning and development of the city. Their study is not only a question of the growth and conservation of green spaces, but also has social, cultural and psychological dimensions. This book brings a perspective of political ecology to the complexities of urban trees and forests through three themes: human agency in urban forests and greenspace; arboreal and greenspace agency in the urban landscape; and actions and interventions in the urban forest. Contributors include leading authorities from North America and Europe from a range of disciplines, including forestry, ecology, geography, landscape design, municipal planning, environmental policy and environmental history.

A Short History of Ethics: A History of Moral Philosophy from the Homeric Age to the 20th Century

by Alasdair MacIntyre

A Short History of Ethics has over the past thirty years become a key philosophical contribution to studies on morality and ethics. Alasdair MacIntyre writes a new preface for this second edition which looks at the book 'thirty years on' and considers its impact. A Short History of Ethics guides the reader through the history of moral philosophy from the Greeks to contemporary times. MacIntyre emphasises the importance of a historical context to moral concepts and ideas showing the relevance of philosophical queries on moral concepts and the importance of a historical account of ethics. A Short History of Ethics is an important contribution written by one of the most important living philosophers. Ideal for all philosophy students interested in ethics and morality.

Luke's Gospel

by Jonathan Knight

Luke's Gospel provides a comprehensive and schematic reading of Luke's Gospel, one of the most important books detailing the life and works of Christ, in six main parts. Knight introduces the Gospel and the narrative theory on which the Gospel rests. He offers a detailed, chapter-by-chapter exposition of the Gospel and also alternative perspectives, such as feminism and deconstruction. He considers the principal motifs of the Gospel, particularly the theme of the temple, which has been previously overlooked in Luke scholarship, arguing that Jesus pronounces the present temple forsaken by God to introduce himself as the cornerstone of the eschatological temple. Finally, he examines earlier readings of Luke's Gospel.Jonathan Knight presents an accessible and jargon-free introduction to the Gospel and makes a valuable addition to the New Testament Readings series.

The Future of Postcolonial Studies (Routledge Research in Postcolonial Literatures)

by Chantal Zabus

The Future of Postcolonial Studies celebrates the twenty-fifth anniversary of the publication of The Empire Writes Back by the now famous troika - Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths and Helen Tiffin. When The Empire Writes Back first appeared in 1989, it put postcolonial cultures and their post-invasion narratives on the map. This vibrant collection of fifteen chapters by both established and emerging scholars taps into this early mapping while merging these concerns with present trends which have been grouped as: comparing, converting, greening, post-queering and utopia. The postcolonial is a centrifugal force that continues to energize globalization, transnational, diaspora, area and queer studies. Spanning the colonial period from the 1860s to the present, The Future of Postcolonial Studies ventures into other postcolonies outside of the Anglophone purview. In reassessing the nation-state, language, race, religion, sexuality, the environment, and the very idea of 'the future,' this volume reasserts the notion that postcolonial is an "anticipatory discourse" and bears testimony to the driving energy and thus the future of postcolonial studies.

Race and Class Distinctions Within Black Communities: A Racial-Caste-in-Class (Routledge Research in Race and Ethnicity #9)

by Paul Camy Mocombe Carol Tomlin Cecile Wright

This book offers both a philosophical and sociological model for understanding the constitution of identity in general, and black social identity in particular, without reverting to either a social or racial deterministic view of identity construction. Using a variant of structuration theory (phenomenological structuralism) this work, against contemporary postmodern and post-structural theories, seeks to offer a dialectical understanding of the constitution of black American and British life within the class division and social relations of production of the global capitalist world-system, while accounting for black social agency.

Understanding Research in Early Childhood Education: Quantitative and Qualitative Methods

by Andrew J. Stremmel Debora Basler Wisneski Jennifer J. Mueller Nancy File

Understanding Research in Early Childhood Education: Quantitative and Qualitative Methods prepares readers to be informed consumers of early childhood research. Rather than following the traditional format of covering quantitative and qualitative methods separately, this innovative textbook offers side-by-side coverage and comparison about the assumptions, questions, purposes and methods for each, offering unique perspectives for understanding young children and early care and education programs. Understanding Research in Early Childhood Education is broadly based across the major research paradigms, and numerous examples are offered throughout the text. Through the use of this book, students will be able to more knowledgeably read, evaluate, and use empirical literature. These skills are becoming more important as early childhood educators are increasingly expected to use evidence-based research in practice and to participate in collecting and analyzing data to inform their teaching.

Types of Thinking

by S. Ian Robertson

Types of Thinking provides a basic grounding in the psychology of thinking for undergraduate students with little previous knowledge of cognitive psychology. This clear, well-structured overview explores the practical aspects and applications of everyday thinking, creative thinking, logical and scientific thinking, intelligent thinking and machine thinking. It also explores 'failures of thinking', the biases and shortcuts that sometimes lead our thinking astray.The author tackles big ideas in an accessible manner and in an entertaining style, ensuring that Types of Thinking will be attractive not only to students but also to teachers organising and planning courses, as well as the lay reader.

Adaptations of Shakespeare: An Anthology of Plays from the 17th Century to the Present

by Daniel Fischlin Mark Fortier

Shakespeare's plays have been adapted or rewritten in various, often surprising, ways since the seventeenth century. This groundbreaking anthology brings together twelve theatrical adaptations of Shakespeares work from around the world and across the centuries. The plays includeThe Woman's Prize or the Tamer Tamed John FletcherThe History of King Lear Nahum TateKing Stephen: A Fragment of a Tragedy John KeatsThe Public (El P(blico) Federico Garcia LorcaThe Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui Bertolt BrechtuMabatha Welcome MsomiMeasure for Measure Charles MarowitzHamletmachine Heiner MüllerLears Daughters The Womens Theatre Group & Elaine FeinsteinDesdemona: A Play About a Handkerchief Paula VogelThis Islands Mine Philip OsmentHarlem Duet Djanet SearsEach play is introduced by a concise, informative introduction with suggestions for further reading. The collection is prefaced by a detailed General Introduction, which offers an invaluable examination of issues related to

The Roman Empire at Bay, AD 180–395: Ad 180-395 (The Routledge History of the Ancient World)

by David S. Potter

The Roman Empire at Bay is the only one volume history of the critical years 180-395 AD, which saw the transformation of the Roman Empire from a unitary state centred on Rome, into a new polity with two capitals and a new religion--Christianity. The book integrates social and intellectual history into the narrative, looking to explore the relationship between contingent events and deeper structure. It also covers an amazingly dramatic narrative from the civil wars after the death of Commodus through the conversion of Constantine to the arrival of the Goths in the Roman Empire, setting in motion the final collapse of the western empire. The new edition takes account of important new scholarship in questions of Roman identity, on economy and society as well as work on the age of Constantine, which has advanced significantly in the last decade, while recent archaeological and art historical work is more fully drawn into the narrative. At its core, the central question that drives The Roman Empire at Bay remains, what did it mean to be a Roman and how did that meaning change as the empire changed? Updated for a new generation of students, this book remains a crucial tool in the study of this period.

The Routledge Handbook of the Cold War

by Artemy M. Kalinovsky Craig Daigle

This new Handbook offers a wide-ranging overview of current scholarship on the Cold War, with essays from many leading scholars. The field of Cold War history has consistently been one of the most vibrant in the field of international studies. Recent scholarship has added to our understanding of familiar Cold War events, such as the Korean War, the Cuban Missile Crisis and superpower détente, and shed new light on the importance of ideology, race, modernization, and transnational movements. The Routledge Handbook of the Cold War draws on the wealth of new Cold War scholarship, bringing together essays on a diverse range of topics such as geopolitics, military power and technology and strategy. The chapters also address the importance of non-state actors, such as scientists, human rights activists and the Catholic Church, and examine the importance of development, foreign aid and overseas assistance. The volume is organised into nine parts: Part I: The Early Cold War Part II: Cracks in the Bloc Part III: Decolonization, Imperialism and its Consequences Part IV: The Cold War in the Third World Part V: The Era of Detente Part VI: Human Rights and Non-State Actors Part VII: Nuclear Weapons, Technology and Intelligence Part VIII: Psychological Warfare, Propaganda and Cold War Culture Part IX: The End of the Cold War This new Handbook will be of great interest to all students of Cold War history, international history, foreign policy, security studies and IR in general.

An Introduction to the Therapeutic Frame (Routledge Mental Health Classic Editions)

by Anne Gray

Designed for psychotherapists and counsellors in training, An Introduction to the Therapeutic Frame clarifies the concept of the frame - the way of working set out in the first meeting between therapist and client. This Classic Edition of the book includes a brand new introduction by the author. Anne Gray, an experienced psychotherapist and teacher, uses lively and extensive case material to show how the frame can both contain feelings and further understanding within the therapeutic relationship. She takes the reader through each stage of therapeutic work, from the first meeting to the final contact, and looks at those aspects of management that beginners often find difficult, such as fee payment, letters and telephone calls, supervision and evaluation. Her practical advice on how to handle these situations will be invaluable to trainees as well as to those involved in their training.

Assessing Psychosis: A Clinician's Guide

by James H. Kleiger Ali Khadivi

Assessing Psychosis: A Clinician’s Guide offers both a practical guide and rich clinical resource for a broad audience of mental-health practitioners seeking to sharpen their understanding of diagnostic issues, clinical concepts, and assessment methods that aid in detecting the presence of psychotic phenomena. Practicing psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and psychiatric nurses will find this a valuable resource for clinical practice, training, and teaching purposes.

Record Label Marketing, 3rd Ed.: How Music Companies Brand and Market Artists in the Digital Era

by Paul Allen Tom Hutchison Amy Macy Clyde Philip Rolston

Record Label Marketing, Third Edition is the essential resource to help you understand how recorded music is professionally marketed. Fully updated to reflect current trends in the industry, this edition is designed to benefit marketing professionals, music business students, and independent artists alike. As with previous editions, the third edition is accessible for readers new to marketing or to the music business. The book addresses classic marketing concepts while providing examples that are grounded in industry practice. Armed with this book, you'll master the jargon, concepts, and language to understand how music companies brand and market artists in the digital era. Features new to this edition include: Social media strategies including step-by-step tactics used by major and independent labels are presented in a new section contributed by Ariel Hyatt, owner of CYBER PR. An in-depth look at SoundScan and other big data matrices used as tools by all entities in the music business. An exploration of the varieties of branding with particular attention paid to the impact of branding to the artist and the music business in a new chapter contributed by Tammy Donham, former Vice President of the Country Music Association. The robust companion website, focalpress.com/cw/macy, features weblinks, exercises, and suggestions for further reading. Instructor resources include PowerPoint lecture outlines, a test bank, and suggested lesson plans.

Logic

by Paul Tomassi

Bringing elementary logic out of the academic darkness into the light of day, Paul Tomassi makes logic fully accessible for anyone attempting to come to grips with the complexities of this challenging subject. Including student-friendly exercises, illustrations, summaries and a glossary of terms, Logic introduces and explains: * The Theory of Validity* The Language of Propositional Logic* Proof-Theory for Propositional Logic* Formal Semantics for Propositional Logic including the Truth-Tree Method* The Language of Quantificational Logic including the Theory of Descriptions. Logic is an ideal textbook for any logic student: perfect for revision, staying on top of coursework or for anyone wanting to learn about the subject. Related downloadable software for Macs and PCs is available for this title at www.logic.routledge.com.

Global Human Trafficking: Critical Issues and Contexts

by Molly Dragiewicz

Human trafficking has moved from relative obscurity to a major area of research, policy and teaching over the past ten years. Research has sprung from criminology, public policy, women’s and gender studies, sociology, anthropology, and law, but has been somewhat hindered by the failure of scholars to engage beyond their own disciplines and favoured methodologies. Recent research has begun to improve efforts to understand the causes of the problem, the experiences of victims, policy efforts, and their consequences in specific cultural and historical contexts. Global Human Trafficking: Critical issues and contexts foregrounds recent empirical work on human trafficking from an interdisciplinary, critical perspective. The collection includes classroom-friendly features, such as introductory chapters that provide essential background for understanding the trafficking literature, textboxes explaining key concepts, discussion questions for each chapter, and lists of additional resources, including films, websites, and additional readings for each chapter. The authors include both eminent and emerging scholars from around the world, drawn from law, anthropology, criminology, sociology, cultural studies, and political science and the book will be useful for undergraduate and graduate courses in these areas, as well as for scholars interested in trafficking.

Migration and Security in the Global Age: Diaspora Communities and Conflict (Routledge Studies in Peace and Conflict Resolution)

by Feargal Cochrane

This book is an interdisciplinary examination of several interconnecting aspects of migrant communities in the context of contemporary conflict and security. The book illustrates that within this globalised world, migrants have become key actors, living in the spaces between states, as well as within them. Arguing that migrants and their descendants are vital and complex constituencies for the achievement of security in this global age, the volume uses a number of case studies, including Palestinian, Sri Lankan, Irish and Somali diaspora communities, to explore the different ways that such groups intersect with issues of security, and how these attitudes and behaviours have evolved in the context of political transnationalism and the global economy. Comparative and econometric studies of migration can provide a wide lens but at times fail to capture the depth and complexity of these communities and attitudes within them. At the same time, empirically focused studies are often case-specific and, while rich in local detail, lack comparative breadth or the ability to make connections and see irregularities across a number of contexts that might be of interest to scholars beyond that specific area. This book connects these literatures together more thoroughly. In particular, it demonstrates that political, cultural, economic and social factors all play important roles in helping us understand the actual (and potential) roles of migrant communities in conflict and the establishment of sustainable security within contemporary society. Lastly, given this context, the book seeks to examine the challenges and opportunities that exist, for such a sustainable security strategy to be developed. This book will be of much interest to students of migration and diaspora communities, peace and conflict studies, security studies and ethnic conflict.

Putting Terrorism in Context: Lessons from the Global Terrorism Database (Contemporary Terrorism Studies)

by Gary LaFree Laura Dugan Erin Miller

This book offers a guide to interpreting available statistical data on terrorism attacks around the world. The Global Terrorism Database (GTD) now includes more than 113,000 terrorist attacks, starting in 1970. By analyzing these data, researchers demonstrate how a very small number of terrorist attacks have had an outsized effect on attitudes and policies toward terrorism. These attacks, referred to as ‘black swan’ events, are difficult to predict but have an enormous impact on human affairs for years to come. The book discusses terrorist attacks, such as 9/11, possibly the most high profile ‘black swan’ event in living memory, by putting them into context with thousands of less publicized attacks that have plagued the world since 1970. Historically, the study of terrorism has suffered from a general lack of empirical data and statistical analysis. This is largely due to the difficulty of obtaining valid data on a topic that poses significant collection challenges. However, this book makes use of the fact that the GTD is currently the most extensive unclassified database on terrorism ever collected. While there have been summaries of the research literature on terrorism and important analyses of international terrorism event data, this is the first book that provides a comprehensive empirical overview of the nature and evolution of both modern international and domestic terrorism. This book will be of interest to students of terrorism and political violence, criminology, international security, and political science in general.

John F. Kennedy: John F. Kennedy (Routledge Historical Biographies)

by Peter J. Ling

A lively, concise and cutting-edge biography of one of the towering figures of 20th-century history. Of all the US presidents of the post-Second World War period, John F. Kennedy is the most clearly idolized. There is a well-documented gulf between the public’s largely positive appraisal of this glamorous historical figure and professional historians’ skeptical and mixed evaluation of a president who had only a foreshortened single term in which to make his mark. What made JFK the man he was? How does he fit into the politics of his time? What were his policy goals, how did they shift, and how far did he manage to advance them? What was the Kennedy style of governance? Why was he killed and how can we explain the unprecedented outpouring of grief that his death elicited? How has his memory evolved since 1963? Acclaimed biographer Peter J. Ling explores all these important questions, sifting and synthesizing the prodigious mass of Kennedy scholarship to provide readers with a fresh and strongly contextualized portrait of the man and his presidency. John F. Kennedy will be essential reading for students of modern American history and anyone else seeking to understand the political and private life of America’s best known president.

UN Peace Operations: Lessons from Haiti, 1994-2016 (Cass Series on Peacekeeping)

by Eirin Mobekk

This book assesses the UN Peace Operations in Haiti and establishes what lessons should be taken into account for future operations elsewhere. Specifically, the book examines the UN’s approaches to security and stability, demobilisation, disarmament and reintegration (DDR), police, justice and prison reform, democratisation, and transitional justice and their interdependencies through the seven UN missions in Haiti. Drawing on extensive fieldwork and interviews conducted in Haiti, it identifies strengths and weaknesses of these approaches and focuses on the connections between these different sectors. It places these efforts in the broader Haitian political context, emphasises economic development as a central factor to sustainability, provides a civil society perspective, and discusses the many constraints the UN faced in implementing its mandates. The book also serves as a historical account of UN involvement in Haiti, which comes at a time when the drawdown of the mission has begun. In an environment where the UN is increasingly seeking to conduct security sector reform (SSR) within the context of integrated missions, this book will be a valuable contribution to the debate on intervention, UN peace operations and SSR. This book will be of interest to students of peace operations and peacekeeping, conflict studies, security studies and IR in general.

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