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Engaging Adolescent Learners: A Guide for Content-area Teachers

by Releah Cossett Lent

Examine what it means to engage young adults in their learning and find out what classrooms with engaged students look, sound, and feel like. Let Releah Lent help you transform your classrooms into places where students have the freedom to satisfy their natural inclination to explore. With Engaging Adolescent Learners at your side, you'll have everything you need to help even the most reluctant students find a way to learn that works for them.

Engaging Anthropological Theory

by Mark Moberg

This lively book offers a fresh look at the history of anthropological theory. Covering key concepts and theorists, Mark Moberg examines the historical context of anthropological ideas and the contested nature of anthropology itself. Anthropological ideas regarding human diversity have always been rooted in the socio-political conditions in which they arose and exploring them in context helps students understand how and why they evolved, and how theory relates to life and society. Illustrated throughout, this engaging text moves away from the dry recitation of past viewpoints in anthropology and brings the subject matter to life. Additional resources are available via a companion website at: http://www.routledge.com/cw/moberg-9780415809160/

Engaging Anthropological Theory: A Social and Political History

by Mark Moberg

This fully revised second edition of Mark Moberg's lively book offers a fresh look at the history of anthropological theory. Covering key concepts and theorists, Engaging Anthropological Theory examines the historical context of anthropological ideas and the contested nature of anthropology itself. Anthropological ideas regarding human diversity have always been rooted in the socio-political conditions in which they arose and exploring them in context helps students understand how and why they evolved, and how theory relates to life and society. Illustrated throughout, this engaging text moves away from the dry recitation of past viewpoints in anthropology and brings the subject matter to life.

Engaging Autism

by Stanley I. Greenspan Serena Wieder

Grateful parents and professionals worldwide have welcomed this essential guide to the highly recommended Floortime approach for treating children with any of the autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Now available in paperback, Engaging Autism includes new, exciting information on neuroscience research into the effects of this approach, plus guidance for parents navigating the controversies surrounding the treatment of autism. Unlike approaches that focus on changing specific behavior, Greenspan’s program promotes the building blocks of healthy emotional and behavioral development. He shows that, remarkably, children with ASD do not have a fixed, limited potential, and may often join their peers to lead full, psychologically healthy lives. The Floortime approach can also be applied at any age--including early infancy, when the first signs of risk for ASD may appear--so that preventing the full development of autism becomes a real possibility.

Engaging Brooke

by Dara Girard

A bride for a Broward? If Brooke Palmer doesn't find a husband within thirty days, she will lose her family home forever. So she turns to the only man she trusts to save her.... Jameson Broward has only one true love: his vast and rugged ranch in Granger, Montana. But he understands the importance of protecting a family's legacy, so he agrees to a marriage of convenience to the woman he's cared about for years. As the stoic groom and his beautiful bride begin their businesslike union, they are confronted by the unexpected lure of their sensual and passionate chemistry. Is it possible for the sexy rancher and his pretend wife to turn their short-term arrangement into a lifetime of love?

Engaging Communication

by Cheri J. Simonds Stephen K. Hunt Brent K. Simonds

Engaging Communication is a brief yet substantive guide to becoming a critical consumer and producer of information. With an emphasis on media- and information-literacy, Engaging Communication supports students in becoming more competent, confident, and ethical communicators through chapters focused on foundational communication principles, crafting constructing clear messages, responding and listening, and communicating persuasively.

Engaging Contradictions: Theory, Politics, and Methods of Activist Scholarship

by Charles R. Hale

The primary purpose of this volume is to provide a broad and grounded counterpoint to the standard admonition to students entering social science and humanities graduate training programs: "Welcome, come in, and please leave your politics at the door."

Engaging Cultural Differences: The Multicultural Challenge in Liberal Democracies

by Martha Minow Hazel Rose Markus Richard A. Shweder

Liberal democracies are based on principles of inclusion and tolerance. But how does the principle of tolerance work in practice in countries such as Germany, France, India, South Africa, and the United States, where an increasingly wide range of cultural groups holds often contradictory beliefs about appropriate social and family life practices? As these democracies expand to include peoples of vastly different cultural backgrounds, the limits of tolerance are being tested as never before. Engaging Cultural Differences explores how liberal democracies respond socially and legally to differences in the cultural and religious practices of their minority groups. Building on such examples, the contributors examine the role of tolerance in practical encounters between state officials and immigrants, and between members of longstanding majority groups and increasing numbers of minority groups. The volume also considers the theoretical implications of expanding the realm of tolerance. Some contributors are reluctant to broaden the scope of tolerance, while others insist that the notion of "tolerance" is itself potentially confining and demeaning and that modern nations should aspire to celebrate cultural differences. Coming to terms with ethnic diversity and cultural differences has become a major public policy concern in contemporary liberal democracies, as they struggle to adjust to burgeoning immigrant populations. Engaging Cultural Differences provides a compelling examination of the challenges of multiculturalism and reveals a deep understanding of the challenges democracies face as they seek to accommodate their citizens' diverse beliefs and practices.

Engaging Curriculum: Bridging the Curriculum Theory and English Education Divide (Studies in Curriculum Theory Series)

by Bill Green

Explicitly linking curriculum inquiry to English education via recurring themes of representation, democracy and knowledge, this book is a call for both researchers and practitioners to engage with curriculum, explicitly and deliberatively, as both a concept and a question. The approach is broadly conceptual and constitutes an exercise in theoretical and philosophical inquiry. While deeply informed by North American debates and developments, this book offers a distinctive counterpoint and a strategically ‘ex-centric’ perspective, being equally informed by the curriculum scene in Australia, as well as the UK and elsewhere. Divided into two sections, this book first addresses matters of general curriculum inquiry, while the second turns more specifically to English teaching and to associated questions of language, literacy and literature in L1 education. Green brings the two together through a critical examination of the Australian national curriculum, especially in its implications and challenges for English teaching, and with due regard for the project of transnational curriculum inquiry.

Engaging Dogen's Zen: The Philosophy of Practice as Awakening

by Kanpu Bret Davis Shudo Brian Schroeder Tetsuzen Jason Wirth

How are the teachings of a thirteenth-century master relevant today? Twenty contemporary writers unpack Dogen's words and show how we can still find meaning in his teachings. Zen Master Dogen, the thirteenth-century founder of Japanese Soto Zen Buddhism, is widely regarded as one of the world’s most remarkable spiritual thinkers. Dogen influence on both Japanese and Western Zen Buddhism cannot be overstated. His writings, emphasizing the nonduality of practice and enlightenment are vastly subtle, endlessly sophisticated—and renownedly challenging to read on one’s own. This unique collection of essays opens up for the reader new pathways for connecting to and making use of Dogen's powerful teachings. Some of Soto Zen’s leading scholars and practitioners offer a masterfully guided tour of Dogen’s writings, organized around two key texts: Shushogi, which is a classical distillation of the whole of Dogen’s teachings, and Fukanzazengi, Dogen universal instructions for Zen meditation. Along the way, the reader will gain an enriched understanding of the Zen practice and realization, of shikantaza or “just sitting,” and of the essence of Mahayana Buddhism—and a much deeper appreciation of this peerless master. Includes essays from Kosho Itagaki, Taigen Dan Leighton, Tenshin Charles Fletcher, Shudo Brian Schroeder, Glen A. Mazis, David Loy, Drew Leder, Steven DeCaroli, Steve Bein, John Maraldo, Michael Schwartz, Tetsuzen Jason M. Wirth, Leah Kalmanson, Erin Jien McCarthy, Dainen David Putney, Steven Heine, Graham Parkes, Mark Unno, Shudo Brian Schroeder, and Kanpu Bret W. Davis.

Engaging Emergence: Turning Upheaval into Opportunity

by Peggy Holman

Shows how to spot the emergence of a new level of order from the seemingly chaotic change that characterizes modern times Offers practices and principles that will help you align yourself and your organization with the new order Features real-world examples of individuals and organizations that have successfully navigated disruptive change 2011 Nautilus Gold Medal in the category of Conscious Business/Leadership Change is everywhere these days, so much so that it can seem like barely-controlled chaos. As a result, increasing numbers of leaders, managers, workers and change agents feel overwhelmed. Some see too many choices, while others see no choices at all. But sometimes within this seeming chaos are the seeds of a higher order. Science calls the process of a new system arising from the ashes of the old emergence. Understanding the phenomenon of emergence can help leaders to gracefully and successfully cope with change and emerge stronger and more purposeful. In this profound and insightful book, Peggy Holman offers new ways to think about the potential upheaval contains as a source of emergent change and shows how to engage it productively. This is is an art more than a science, so Holman offers practices that tell you not precisely what to do but rather how to approach disruptive situations–what to notice, what to explore, what to try, what mindset will leave you most open to identifying the new paradigm as it emerges. She grounds these practices in five overarching principles that apply the scientific understanding of emergence in the natural world to social and organizational change processes. Real-world stories of collapse and renewal serve to illustrate these principles and practices in action. And Holman outlines three questions to help you work compassionately, creatively and wisely with the entire arc of the change process, from coherence to disruption to renewal. This work can be difficult—the end is rarely in sight and the outcome is often uncertain. But it can also be tremendously exciting. Our survival in an increasingly unpredictable world is at stake, and working consciously with emergence is a promising pathway to doing something about it.

Engaging Evil: A Moral Anthropology (Methodology & History in Anthropology #36)

by William C. Olsen Thomas J. Csordas

Anthropologists have expressed wariness about the concept of evil even in discussions of morality and ethics, in part because the concept carries its own cultural baggage and theological implications in Euro-American societies. Addressing the problem of evil as a distinctly human phenomenon and a category of ethnographic analysis, this volume shows the usefulness of engaging evil as a descriptor of empirical reality where concepts such as violence, criminality, and hatred fall short of capturing the darkest side of human existence.

Engaging Father Christmas

by Robin Jones Gunn

Miranda Carson can't wait to return to England for Christmas and to be with her boyfriend, Ian. She has spent a lifetime yearning for a place to call home, and she's sure Carlton Heath will be it, especially when a hinted-at engagement ring slips into the conversation. But Miranda's high hopes for a jolly Christmas with the small circle of people she has come to love are toppled when Ian's father is hospitalized and the matriarch of the Whitcombe family withholds her blessing from Miranda. Questions run rampant in Miranda's mind about whether she really belongs in this cheery corner of the world. Then, when her true identity threatens all her relationships in unanticipated ways, Miranda is certain all is lost. And yet . . . maybe Father Christmas has special gifts in store for her after all.

Engaging Government Employees: Motivate and Inspire Your People to Achieve Superior Performance

by Bob Lavigna

Government employees face enormous challenges today, including being stigmatized as underworked and overpaid. At the same time, they're being asked to solve some of our toughest problems including unemployment, security, poverty, and education In Engaging Government Employees, Bob Lavigna gives managers the tools they need to leverage the talents of government's most important resource: its people. He shows them how to measure, nurture, and sustain the kind of authentic employee engagement that drives results. With over three decades of experience in public sector HR, he knows how to get team members passionate about the agency's mission, and committed to its success. Readers will learn: * Why a highly engaged staff is 20 percent more productive * How to get employees to deliver "discretionary effort" * How to assess the level of engagement * Why free pizza and Coke every Friday is not a viable strategy * And more Drawing on a wealth of empirical evidence, Engaging Government Employees rejects the typical, one-size-fits-all approach to motivation and shows how America's largest employer can apply the science of engagement to dramatically improve performance.

Engaging Haydn: Culture, Context, and Criticism

by Mary Hunter Richard Will

Haydn is enjoying renewed appreciation as one of the towering figures of Western music history. This lively collection builds upon this resurgence of interest, with chapters exploring the nature of Haydn's invention and the cultural forces that he both absorbed and helped to shape and express. The volume addresses Haydn's celebrated instrumental pieces, the epoch-making Creation and many lesser-known but superb vocal works including the Masses, the English canzonettas and Scottish songs and the operas L'isola disabitata and L'anima del filosofo. Topics range from Haydn's rondo forms to his violin fingerings, from his interpretation of the Credo to his reading of Ovid's Metamorphoses, from his involvement with national music to his influence on the emerging concept of the musical work. Haydn emerges as an engaged artist in every sense of the term, as remarkable for his critical response to the world around him as for his innovations in musical composition.

Engaging Humor

by Elliott Oring

Elliott Oring asks essential questions concerning humorous expression in contemporary society, examining how humor works, why it is employed, and what its messages might be. This provocative book is filled with examples of jokes and riddles that reveal humor to be a meaningful--even significant--form of expression. Oring provides alternate ways of thinking about humorous expressions by examining their contexts--not just their contents. Engaging Humor demonstrates that when analyzed contextually and comparatively, humorous expressions emerge as communications that are startling, intriguing, and profound.

Engaging In Narrative Inquiry (Developing Qualitative Inquiry)

by D. Clandinin

Narrative inquiry examines human lives through the lens of a narrative, honoring lived experience as a source of important knowledge and understanding. In this concise volume, D. Jean Clandinin, one of the pioneers in using narrative as research, updates her classic formulation on narrative inquiry (with F. Michael Connelly), clarifying, extending and refining the method based on an additional decade of work. A valuable feature is the inclusion of several exemplary cases with the author’s critique and analysis of the work. The rise of interest in narrative inquiry in recent years makes this is an essential guide for researchers and an excellent text for graduate courses in qualitative inquiry.

Engaging Mirror Neurons to Inspire Connection and Social Emotional Development in Children and Teens on the Autism Spectrum: Theory into Practice through Drama Therapy

by Lee R. Chasen Robert J Landy

The innovative drama therapy programme develops social skills in children and teens on the autism spectrum by looking to the mirror neuron system as the key to social connection and interaction. Lee R. Chasen provides an accessible explanation of the approach's grounding in neuroscience, followed by a thirty-session program involving creative tools such as guided play, sociometry, puppetry, role-play, video modeling and improvisation. Scenarios drawn from his own practice provide useful insights into both the practicalities and positive results of this unique approach. This ground-breaking book will be of interest to drama and creative arts therapists, as well as teachers, school psychologists, counsellors and other professionals who work with children on the autism spectrum.

Engaging, Motivating and Empowering Learners in Schools

by Des Hewitt Brittany Wright

Successful teachers are able to motivate and inspire the children they teach and this is a skill that can only be supported by understanding good practice. This book gives you smart, pragmatic guidance backed by evidence-based research on how to engage and inspire in your teaching. It looks at both how you can influence and shape the learning that goes on in your classroom and how you can apply key lessons to your own professional development as a teacher. Key coverage includes: · The psychology of motivation and its implications for the classroom · Behaviour for learning · Essential advice on of safeguarding, mental health and wellbeing · Active learning and engaging your pupils in the learning process · How to develop as a professional and empowered teacher

Engaging Organizational Communication Theory and Research: Multiple Perspectives

by Steve May Dennis K. Mumby

Engaging Organizational Communication Theory and Research: Multiple Perspectives is a book unlike any in the field. Each chapter is written by a prominent scholar who presents a theoretical perspective and discusses how he or she "engages" with it, personally examining what it means to study organizations. Rejecting the traditional model of a "reader," this volume demonstrates the intimate connections among theory, research, and personal experience. Engaging Organizational Communication Theory and Research is an indispensable resource for anyone wishing to be familiar with current trends in the field of organizational communication.

Engaging Student Voices in Higher Education: Diverse Perspectives and Expectations in Partnership

by Ian M. Kinchin Naomi E. Winstone Simon Lygo-Baker

This book examines the importance of exploring the varied and diverse perspectives of student experiences. In both academic institutions and everyday discourse, the notion of the ‘student voice’ is an ever-present reminder of the importance placed upon the student experience in Higher Education: particularly in a context where the financial burden of undertaking a university education continues to grow. The editors and contributors explore how notions of the ‘student voice’ as a single, monolithic entity may in fact obscure divergence in the experiences of students. Placing so much emphasis on the ‘student voice’ may lead educators and policy makers to miss important messages communicated – or consciously uncommunicated – through student actions. This book also explores ways of working in partnership with students to develop their own experiences. It is sure to be of interest and value to scholars of the student experience and its inherent diversity.

Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty

by Peter Felten Alison Cook-Sather Catherine Bovill

A guide to developing productive student-faculty partnerships in higher education Student-faculty partnerships is an innovation that is gaining traction on campuses across the country. There are few established models in this new endeavor, however. Engaging Students as Partners in Learning and Teaching: A Guide for Faculty offers administrators, faculty, and students both the theoretical grounding and practical guidelines needed to develop student-faculty partnerships that affirm and improve teaching and learning in higher education. Provides theory and evidence to support new efforts in student-faculty partnerships Describes various models for creating and supporting such partnerships Helps faculty overcome some of the perceived barriers to student-faculty partnerships Suggests a range of possible levels of partnership that might be appropriate in different circumstances Includes helpful responses to a range of questions as well as advice from faculty, students, and administrators who have hands-on experience with partnership programs Balancing theory, step-by-step guidelines, expert advice, and practitioner experience, this book is a comprehensive why- and how-to handbook for developing a successful student-faculty partnership program.

Engaging Superdiversity: Recombining Spaces, Times and Language Practices

by Karel Arnaut Martha Sif Karrebæk

This book is the fruition of five years' work in exploring the idea of superdiversity. The editors argue that sociolinguistic superdiversity could be a source of inspiration to a wide range of post-structuralist, post-colonial and neo-Marxist interdisciplinary research into the potential and the limits of human cultural creativity and societal renewal under conditions of increasing and complexifying global connectivity. Through case studies of language practices in spaces understood as inherently translocal and multi-layered (classrooms and schools, youth spaces, mercantile spaces and nation-states), this book explores the relevance of superdiversity for the social and human sciences and positions it as a research perspective in sociolinguistics and beyond.

Engaging the Christian Scriptures: An Introduction to the Bible

by Andrew E. Arterbury Derek S. Dodson W. H. Bellinger

This readable, affordable, and faith-friendly introduction to the Bible aids students as they engage in their first informed reading of the biblical text in an academic setting. The authors, who have significant undergraduate teaching experience, approach the Christian Scriptures from historical, literary, and theological perspectives. The book is designed for a one-semester course and is meant to be read alongside the biblical text, enabling students to become educated readers of the Bible. In the process, it introduces critical perspectives and approaches without undermining the theological claims found in the Christian Scriptures.

Engaging the Past: The Uses of History Across the Social Sciences

by Eric H. Monkkonen

Vigorous historical exploration has increased across the social sciences in the past two decades. Originally published as a series of articles in the journal Social Science History, the essays in this volume provide a guide to historical social science by surveying the use of historical data and methodologies in anthropology, sociology, political science, economics, and geography.Each essay in Engaging the Past pays close attention to the unique problems and methods associated with its particular social scientific discipline. By exploring questions raised by both contemporary and more established works within each field, the authors show that some of the best and most innovative research in each of the social sciences includes a strong historical component. Thus, as Eric H. Monkkonen's introduction shows, these essays taken together make it clear that historical research provides a significant key to many of the major issues in the social sciences.Intended for the growing community of both social scientists and historians interested in reading or researching historically informed social science, Engaging the Past suggests future directions that might be taken by this work. Above all, by providing a set of user's guides written by respected social scientists, it encourages future boundary crossings between history and each of the social sciences.Contributors. Andrew Abbott, Richard Dennis, Susan Kellog, Eric H. Monkkonen, David Brian Robertson, Hugh Rockoff

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