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How Marriage Became One of the Sacraments: The Sacramental Theology of Marriage from its Medieval Origins to the Council of Trent (Cambridge Studies In Law And Christianity)

by Philip L. Reynolds

Among the contributions of the medieval church to western culture was the idea that marriage was one of the seven sacraments, which defined the role of married folk in the church. Although it had ancient roots, this new way of regarding marriage raised many problems, to which scholastic theologians applied all their ingenuity. By the late Middle Ages, the doctrine was fully established in Christian thought and practice but not yet as dogma. In the sixteenth century, with the entire Catholic teaching on marriage and celibacy and its associated law and jurisdiction under attack by the Protestant reformers, the Council of Trent defined the doctrine as a dogma of faith for the first time but made major changes to it. Rather than focusing on a particular aspect of intellectual and institutional developments, this book examines them in depth and in detail from their ancient precedents to the Council of Trent. Provides a comprehensive, up-to-date and critical analysis. Copiously documented with primary and secondary references for further study. Non-confessional and open to readers of all persuasions, in a field dominated by confessional and often defensive Catholic studies.

How Matter Becomes Conscious: A Naturalistic Theory Of The Mind

by Jan Faye

This innovative book proposes a unique and original perspective on the nature of the mind and how phenomenal consciousness may arise in a physical world. From simple sentient organisms to complex self-reflective systems, Faye argues for a naturalistic-evolutionary approach to philosophy of mind and consciousness. Drawing on substantial literature in evolutionary biology and cognitive science, this book offers a promising alternative to the major theories of the mind-body problem: the quality of our experiences should not, as some philosophers have claimed, be associated with subjectivity that is not open for scientific explanation, nor should it be associated with intrinsic properties of the brain. Instead, Faye argues that mental properties are extrinsic properties of the brain caused by the organism’s interaction with its environment. Taking on the explanatory gap, and rejecting the ontological pluralism of present naturalist theories of the mind, Faye thus proposes a unified view of reality in which it is possible to explain qualitative mental presentations as part of the physical world.

How May We Hate You?

by Todd Dakotah Briscoe Anna Drezen

Most people think hotel employees are effortlessly cheerful, naturally helpful, and genuinely like their work. Most people are wrong. Find out what really goes on in the world of hospitality with this hilarious book full of funny and absurd stories, anecdotes told in dialogue, factoids, and hoax pop quizzes by two veteran concierges who paid their way while working at a combined 50 hotels in and around Times Square. They are very pleased to help you learn: · The Truth About Bed Bugs · The Mythology of "Loyalty Programs" · The 411 on Hotel Residents · And so much more Filled with photographs and infographics, How May We Hate You? is both romp and commentary on the hospitality industry and life behind the nametag.

How Mediation Works: Resolving Conflict Through Talk (Studies in Interactional Sociolinguistics #34)

by Angela Cora Garcia

Using conversation analysis to study the interaction between mediators and disputants, this study shows how mediation is used to resolve conflict in small claims and divorce mediation sessions. Angela Garcia explores the techniques mediators use to help disputants tell their stories, make and respond to complaints and accusations, and come up with ideas for resolving the dispute. By analyzing these techniques in their interactional context, she shows how they impact the experience and responses of disputants, and demonstrates that mediator techniques can empower disputants, maximize disputant autonomy, and display mediator's neutrality while in some cases, the organization of talk in mediation may work against these goals. This book is the first to use conversation analysis to study how mediation works and how mediators can best help disputants.

How Much Have Global Problems Cost the World?

by Bjørn Lomborg

There are often blanket claims that the world is facing more problems than ever but there is a lack of empirical data to show where things have deteriorated or in fact improved. In this book, some of the world's leading economists discuss ten problems that have blighted human development, ranging from malnutrition, education, and climate change, to trade barriers and armed conflicts. Costs of the problems are quantified in percent of GDP, giving readers a unique opportunity to understand the development of each problem over the past century and the likely development into the middle of this century, and to compare the size of the challenges. For example: how bad was air pollution in 1900? How has it deteriorated and what about the future? Did climate change cost more than malnutrition in 2010? This pioneering initiative to provide answers to many of these questions will undoubtedly spark debate amongst a wide readership.

How Much is Enough?

by Edward Skidelsky Robert Skidelsky

What constitutes the good life? What is the true value of money? Why do we work such long hours merely to acquire greater wealth? These are some of the questions that many asked themselves when the financial system crashed in 2008. This book tackles such questions head-on. The authors begin with the great economist John Maynard Keynes. In 1930 Keynes predicted that, within a century, per capita income would steadily rise, people's basic needs would be met, and no one would have to work more than fifteen hours a week. Clearly, he was wrong: though income has increased as he envisioned, our wants have seemingly gone unsatisfied, and we continue to work long hours. The Skidelskys explain why Keynes was mistaken. Then, arguing from the premise that economics is a moral science, they trace the concept of the good life from Aristotle to the present and show how our lives over the last half century have strayed from that ideal. Finally, they issue a call to think anew about what really matters in our lives and how to attain it. How Much Is Enough? is that rarity, a work of deep intelligence and ethical commitment accessible to all readers. It will be lauded, debated, cited, and criticized. It will not be ignored.

How Much Is A Million?

by David M. Schwartz

An attempt to help children conceptualize the immensity of numbers is aided immeasurably by the artist's jovial, detailed, whimsical illustrations.

How Music Can Make You Better (The HOW Series)

by Indre Viskontas PhD

How can certain songs carry us through a tough workout, comfort us after a breakup, or unite 50,000 diverse fans? In this fascinating field guide, neuroscientist and opera singer Indre Viskontas investigates what music is and how it can change us for the better—from deep in our neurons to across our entire society. Whether hip-hop fans, classically trained pianists, or vinyl collectors, readers will think about their favorite songs in a whole new way by the end of this book. This is a vibrant and smart gift for any audiophile.

How Music Dies (or Lives): Field Recording and the Battle for Democracy in the Arts

by Ian Brennan

All recordings document life, arising from a specific time and place, and if that place is artificial, the results will be as well. Culled from a lifetime of learning through failure and designed to provoke thought and inspiration for artists in every medium, How Music Dies (or Lives) is a virtual how-to manual for those on a quest for authenticity in an age of airbrushed and Auto-Tuned so-called "artists. ” Author and Grammy-winning producer Ian Brennan chronicles his own journeys to find new and ancient sounds, textured voices, and nonmalleable songs, and he presents readers with an intricate look at our technological society. His concise prose covers topics such as: *The damages of colonization in generalizing distinctive variations *The need for imperfection *The gaps between manufacturing and invention *The saturation of music in everyday life This guide serves those who ask themselves, "What’s wrong with our culture?” Along with possible answers are lessons in using the microphone as a telescope, hearing the earth as an echo, and appreciating the value of democratizing voices.

How Music Got Free

by Stephen Witt

"What happens when an entire generation commits the same crime?"How Music Got Free is a riveting story of obsession, music, crime, and money, featuring visionaries and criminals, moguls and tech-savvy teenagers. It's about the greatest pirate in history, the most powerful executive in the music business, a revolutionary invention and an illegal website four times the size of the iTunes Music Store. Journalist Stephen Witt traces the secret history of digital music piracy, from the German audio engineers who invented the mp3, to a North Carolina compact-disc manufacturing plant where factory worker Dell Glover leaked nearly two thousand albums over the course of a decade, to the high-rises of midtown Manhattan where music executive Doug Morris cornered the global market on rap, and, finally, into the darkest recesses of the Internet.Through these interwoven narratives, Witt has written a thrilling book that depicts the moment in history when ordinary life became forever entwined with the world online -- when, suddenly, all the music ever recorded was available for free. In the page-turning tradition of writers like Michael Lewis and Lawrence Wright, Witt's deeply-reported first book introduces the unforgettable characters--inventors, executives, factory workers, and smugglers--who revolutionized an entire artform, and reveals for the first time the secret underworld of media pirates that transformed our digital lives.An irresistible never-before-told story of greed, cunning, genius, and deceit, How Music Got Free isn't just a story of the music industry--it's a must-read history of the Internet itself.

How Music Works

by David Byrne

*Updated with a new chapter on digital curation*How Music Works is David Byrne’s incisive and enthusiastic look at the musical art form, from its very inceptions to the influences that shape it, whether acoustical, economic, social or technological. Utilizing his incomparable career and inspired collaborations with Talking Heads, Brian Eno, and many others, Byrne taps deeply into his lifetime of knowledge to explore the panoptic elements of music, how it shapes the human experience, and reveals the impetus behind how we create, consume, distribute, and enjoy the songs, symphonies, and rhythms that provide the backbeat of life. Byrne’s magnum opus uncovers ever-new and thrilling realizations about the redemptive liberation that music brings us all.

How Music Works: The Science and Psychology of Beautiful Sounds, from Beethoven to the Beatles and Beyond

by John Powell

What makes a musical note different from any other sound? How can you tell if you have perfect pitch? Why do 10 violins sound only twice as loud as one? Do your Bob Dylan albums sound better on CD or vinyl? John Powell, a scientist and musician, answers these questions and many more in HOW MUSIC WORKS, an intriguing and original guide to acoustics. In a clear, accessible, and engaging voice, Powell fascinates the reader with his delightful descriptions of the science and psychology lurking beneath the surface of music. With lively discussions of the secrets behind harmony, timbre, keys, chords, loudness, musical composition, and more, HOW MUSIC WORKS will be treasured by music lovers everywhere.

How My Death Saved My Life: And Other Stories On My Journey To Wholeness

by Denise Linn

How My Death Saved My Life is the remarkable story of author Denise Linn. In this triumphant autobiography, Denise speaks with a compassionate yet fiery conviction, born of deep pain, as she describes overcoming the horror of an abusive childhood and the terror of being stricken down by an unknown gunman. From the mundane to the mystical, follow Denise’s inner and outer journeys as she grows up in various homes from abandoned army barracks, to the slums of Chicago, to an Ohio farming community. Travel with her as she is fired on by a plane in Yugoslavia, is tear gassed during antiwar riots, explores the sexual revolution in the ’60s, lives in a Buddhist monastery, and travels to native cultures to become one of the world’s most sought-after speakers and a best-selling author. Thousands of people worldwide have attended her lectures . . . and now, for the first time, they can read the story behind this internationally renowned woman.

How My Parents Learned to Eat

by Ina R. Friedman

An American sailor courts a Japanese girl and each tries, in secret, to learn the other's way of eating.

How NASA Builds Teams

by Charles J. Pellerin

Every successful organization needs high-performance teams to compete and succeed. Yet, technical people are often resistant to traditional "touchy-feely" teambuilding.To improve communication, performance, and morale among NASA's technical teams, former NASA Astrophysicist Dr. Charlie Pellerin developed the teambuilding process described in "How NASA Builds Teams"--an approach that is proven, quantitative, and requires only a fraction of the time and resources of traditional training methods. This "4-D" process has boosted team performance in hundreds of NASA project teams, engineering teams, and management teams, including the people responsible for NASA's most complex systems -- the Space Shuttle, space telescopes, robots on Mars, and the mission back to the moon. How NASA Builds Teams explains how the 4-D teambuilding process can be applied in any organization, and includes a fast, free on-line behavioral assessment to help your team and the individual members understand each other and measure the key driver of team performance, the social context.Moreover, these simple, logical processes appeal strongly to technical teams who eschew "touchy-feely" training. Pellerin applies simple, elegant principles from his physics background to the art teambuilding, such as the use of a coordinate system to analyze the characteristics of team performance into actionable elements.The author illustrates the teambuilding process with entertaining stories from his decade as NASA's Director for Astrophysics and subsequent 15 years of working closely with NASA and outside business teams. For example, he tells how the processes in the book enabled him to initiate the space mission to fix the Hubble Space Telescope's flawed mirror.Free downloadable resources will help you:Identify your teammates' innate personalitiesDiagram your culture (And compare it to your customer's)Measure the coherency of your project's paradigm (Get this wrong and you will be fired!) andLearn to meet people's need to feel valued by you.Further, you can download and use Pellerin's most powerful tool for influencing the outcome of any difficult situation: the Context Shifting Worksheet.

How Nina Got Her Fang Back: An Accidental Quickie (Accidentally Paranormal Ser. #13)

by Dakota Cassidy

"Look, Fakey-Locks, I said I'd go and I'm going, okay? Now get the flip off me before I pluck your stupid bullshit extension eyelashes out one at a time!"How Nina Got Her Fang Back, is Book 13 of the Accidentally Paranormal series by USA Today bestselling romantic comedy author Dakota Cassidy. A hilarious tale about ex-vampire Nina, a witch ...um doctor... in charge of helping Nina cope, and the crew of OOPS as they are dragged into danger...again!It's been a while since Nina Statleon-ex-coffin lover, current chicken wing lover-lost her vampire mojo during a particularly brutal OOPS case. Her friends Wanda and Marty are worried. Nina clearly hasn't dealt with the emotional fallout caused by losing one's immortality. She's got issues. Big issues. And it's time to call in the Big Gun-paranormal psychologist January Malone. Her friends will get Nina to the therapist's office, even if they have to lure her with the last bag of Cheetos in Manhattan.Of course, the girls couldn't possibly know that Doctor Malone has an agenda. A forced agenda involving blackmail, which may just save one life...while ending another. It goes against everything January, a white witch, has ever believed in, personally and professionally.But the alternative means putting her trust in a foul-mouthed ex-vampire, her werewolf and halfsie friends, a demon, a zombie, a bear and their assorted mates...Yikes!How Nina Got Her Fang Back is a paranormal romantic comedy and contains vampires, shifters, witches, supernatural creatures, and LOL fun.

How Not to Act Like a Grumpy Old Man

by Mary Mchugh Duncan Rand

Is Your Age Getting You Down? Are you now grumpy because of it? If you're looking for ways to start thinking and acting young again, then this humorous, advice-filled book is for you. Included are tips of how you can live a happy, fulfilling, and exciting senior life. Discover ways to make each day better than the last while feeling better, looking better, and enjoying yourself more with hobbies, travel, continued education, second careers, and even marriage, while not overlooking the value family and friends, plus much more. So why be grumpy in your golden years when your life can still be productive, fun and fulfilling? How Not to Act Like a Grumpy Old Man will show you the way.

How Not to Act Like a Little Old Lady

by Mary Mchugh

In this humorous, advice-filled book, best-selling author Mary McHugh has written down her secrets for living a long and happy life after 50. If you're looking for ways to enrich your days, to be happier, to find a new approach to life's problems, you need this book. It's for everyone who wants to make the years ahead more fulfilling, more fun and more meaningful. Each chapter is a short take on making every day better than the day before. If you want to look better, feel better, have more fun, try the tips in this easy-to-read, lively book, so you never act like a little old lady.

How Not to Act Old: 185 Ways to Pass for Phat, Sick, Dope, Awesome, or at Least Not Totally Lame

by Pamela Redmond Satran

How to be cool when you're afraid you've forgotten how . . . Sure, you can try to stay younger by exercising, coloring your hair, and wearing stylish clothes--but how do you respond when someone asks, "Do you Twitter?" How Not to Act Old gives you simple ways to come back from over the hill and to act as young as you look.Covering everything from old-people entertainment (cancel that dinner party!) to old-people communication (it's called a "voice mail," not a "message," and no one leaves or listens to them anyway), Pamela Redmond Satran decodes the behaviors, viewpoints, and cultural touchstones that separate you from the hip young person you wish you still were. This irreverent guide is essential for anyone who doesn't want to embarrass their kids--or themselves.

How Not to Act Old

by Pamela Redmond Satran

How to be cool when you're afraid you've forgotten how . . . Sure, you can try to stay younger by exercising, coloring your hair, and wearing stylish clothes--but how do you respond when someone asks, "Do you Twitter?" How Not to Act Old gives you simple ways to come back from over the hill and to act as young as you look. Covering everything from old-people entertainment (cancel that dinner party!) to old-people communication (it's called a "voice mail," not a "message," and no one leaves or listens to them anyway), Pamela Redmond Satran decodes the behaviors, viewpoints, and cultural touchstones that separate you from the hip young person you wish you still were. This irreverent guide is essential for anyone who doesn't want to embarrass their kids--or themselves.

How Not to Be Popular

by Jennifer Ziegler

Maggie Dempsey is tired of moving all over the country. Her parents are second-generation hippies who uproot her every year or so to move to a new city. When Maggie was younger, she thought it was fun and adventurous. Now that she’s a teenager, she hates it. When she moved after her freshman year, she left behind good friends, a great school, and a real feeling of belonging. When she moved her sophomore year, she left behind a boyfriend, too. Now that they’ve moved to Austin, she knows better. She...

How (Not) to Be Secular: Reading Charles Taylor

by James K. Smith

How (Not) to Be Secular is what Jamie Smith calls "your hitchhiker's guide to the present" -- it is both a reading guide to Charles Taylor's monumental work A Secular Age and philosophical guidance on how we might learn to live in our times.Taylor's landmark book A Secular Age (2007) provides a monumental, incisive analysis of what it means to live in the post-Christian present -- a pluralist world of competing beliefs and growing unbelief. Jamie Smith's book is a compact field guide to Taylor's insightful study of the secular, making that very significant but daunting work accessible to a wide array of readers.Even more, though, Smith's How (Not) to Be Secular is a practical philosophical guidebook, a kind of how-to manual on how to live in our secular age. It ultimately offers us an adventure in self-understanding and maps out a way to get our bearings in today's secular culture, no matter who "we" are -- whether believers or skeptics, devout or doubting, self-assured or puzzled and confused. This is a book for any thinking person to chew on.

How (Not) To Be Secular: Reading Charles Taylor

by James K. A. Smith

What does it mean to say we live in a secular world? Charles Taylor's landmark book A Secular Age (2007) provides a monumental history and analysis of what it means for us to live in our post- Christian present - a pluralist world of competing beliefs and growing unbelief. This book by Jamie Smith is a compact field guide to Taylor's genealogy of the secular, making that 900-page work accessible to a wide array of readers. Smith's How (Not) to Be Secular is also, however, a philosophical guidebook for practitioners - a kind of how-to manual that ultimately offers guidance on how to live in a secular age. It's an adventure in self-understanding and a way to get our bearings in postmodernity. Whether one is proclaiming faith to the secularized or is puzzled that there continue to be people of faith in this day and age, this book is a philosophical story meant to help us locate where we are and what's at stake.

How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking

by Jordan Ellenberg

<P>The Freakonomics of math—a math-world superstar unveils the hidden beauty and logic of the world and puts its power in our handsThe math we learn in school can seem like a dull set of rules, laid down by the ancients and not to be questioned. In How Not to Be Wrong, Jordan Ellenberg shows us how terribly limiting this view is: Math isn’t confined to abstract incidents that never occur in real life, but rather touches everything we do—the whole world is shot through with it. <P>Math allows us to see the hidden structures underneath the messy and chaotic surface of our world. It’s a science of not being wrong, hammered out by centuries of hard work and argument. Armed with the tools of mathematics, we can see through to the true meaning of information we take for granted: How early should you get to the airport? What does “public opinion” really represent? Why do tall parents have shorter children? Who really won Florida in 2000? And how likely are you, really, to develop cancer? <P>How Not to Be Wrong presents the surprising revelations behind all of these questions and many more, using the mathematician’s method of analyzing life and exposing the hard-won insights of the academic community to the layman—minus the jargon. Ellenberg chases mathematical threads through a vast range of time and space, from the everyday to the cosmic, encountering, among other things, baseball, Reaganomics, daring lottery schemes, Voltaire, the replicability crisis in psychology, Italian Renaissance painting, artificial languages, the development of non-Euclidean geometry, the coming obesity apocalypse, Antonin Scalia’s views on crime and punishment, the psychology of slime molds, what Facebook can and can’t figure out about you, and the existence of God. <P>Ellenberg pulls from history as well as from the latest theoretical developments to provide those not trained in math with the knowledge they need. Math, as Ellenberg says, is “an atomic-powered prosthesis that you attach to your common sense, vastly multiplying its reach and strength.” With the tools of mathematics in hand, you can understand the world in a deeper, more meaningful way. How Not to Be Wrong will show you how. <P><b>A New York Times Bestseller</b>

How Not to Become a Little Old Lady

by Mary Mchugh

You can be little, and you can be old, but that doesn't mean you have to be a Little Old Lady. We've all seen her. She's hunched forward, her blue hair is tucked neatly under a plastic rain bonnet, she's clutching expired coupons, and she's discussing her latest health problems over lunch. She's a Little Old Lady. . . and she's coming your way at two mph. Little Old Ladies have elastic waistbands on all their slacks. They save rubber bands, remember fifteen-cent McDonald's hamburgers, and have never seen a public rest room that was clean enough. How Not to Become a Little Old Lady is for any woman who is proud to have escaped Little Old Lady-hood, and it's for anyone in danger of slipping into those awful Little Old Lady tendencies.

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