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The Goomba Diet

by Charles Fleming Steven R. Schirripa

Hey, goomba! Are you on theGoomba Diet? Do you need to be? * Do they put up crime scene tape after you visit the buffet table? * Is the air freshener in your car a slice of provolone? Stop crying! TheGoomba Dietis here--the dolce vita diet that shows you how to eat more, drink more, laugh more, live more, and feel great while you're doing it. TheGoomba Dietoffers sensible weight-loss tips for the guy who's gone too far: * Touch your toes. If this is difficult, pay a guy to do it for you. * Walk to court. It also offers helpful maintenance tips for the goomba who's the perfect weight and wants to stay that way: * Try an appetite suppressant. Try eating at Applebee's. * Pick up something heavy. Get a copy ofThe Da Vinci Code. * Cut out those carbs. Only eat pastas that end in the letter i. TheGoomba Dietis the personal lifestyle guide from Steven R. Schirripa--Bobby "Bacala" Baccalieri from HBO's hit seriesThe Sopranosand author of the bestsellerA Goomba's Guide to Life. Developed over decades of dreaming about and then living the high life, it's a how-to guide for happy living--how to duke a maître d', how to order a good meal, how to be a good father, a good husband and a good friend, and how to behave at a wedding, a funeral, and on the job. You wanna have a good time? Follow these rules: * Do tip the maid. Don't tip the made guy. * Do tip the D. J. Don't tip the D. A. * Do tell the bride she's beautiful. Don't tell her she's hardly showing. * Do give your kids an allowance. Don't offer to "make it interesting" by shooting craps for double or nothing. TheGoomba Dietis for everyone with an appetite for life, and for everyone who understands that the key to happiness isn't found in a smaller waistline but in a bigger heart. Like Steve says, "There's a lot of skinny actors wearing black turtlenecks and tending bar right now who'd kill for a part onThe Sopranos. This fat goomba is doing all right for himself. " So relax! Stop worrying about how much you're eating, and start worrying about how much you're enjoying it. Lose weight if you like--butlive! Put a fork in your right hand, a hunk of bread in your left, andmangialike you mean it. HBO® andThe Sopranos® are service marks of Time Warner Entertainment Company, L. P.

The Goomba's Book of Love

by Charles Fleming Steven R. Schirripa

Move over Miss Lonelyhearts . . . Steven R. Schirripa, author of the runaway bestseller A Goomba's Guide to Life, is back with more life lessons from the neighborhood. Recalling stories of his own colorful journey from the streets of Bensonhurst to the bright lights of Las Vegas and stardom as Bobby "Bacala" Baccalieri in the HBO hit series The Sopranos, Schirripa observes the finer points of amore in all its forms--love for his mother and her Sunday sauce, his wife and kids, his friends, his goomar on the side, even for his car (and he better not catch you eating in it, if you know what's good for you). Alternately touching, telling, and laugh-out-loud funny, The Goomba's Book of Love proves that no one loves as fiercely (or as frequently) as a goomba.

A Goomba's Guide to Life

by Charles Fleming Steven R. Schirripa

Attention would-be paesans: Can't distinguish "gabagool" from "pasta fazool"? Not sure how to properly accessorize your track suit with gold chains? Does the phrase "go to the mattresses" make you sleepy? Now Steven R. Schirripa, The Sopranos' own Bobby Bacala, exposes the inner mysteries of this unique Italian-American hybrid in A Goomba's Guide to Life so that anyone can walk, talk, and live like a guy "from the neighborhood." Über-goomba Steve Schirripa shows how being a goomba made him what he is today, offering lessons learned on his own journey from Bensonhurst to Vegas, and to his current gig as Bobby Bacala on one of TV's most popular shows. Along the way, he shares secrets that will help you get in touch with your own inner goomba. You'll learn what music to enjoy (Sinatra, yes; Snoop Dogg, no), what movies to watch (Raging Bull, yes; Titanic, never), which sports to follow (baseball is good; golf and tennis, fuhgeddaboudit), and even tips on goomba etiquette. Ever wonder how a real goomba gets the best seat in the house? (Hint: It involves tipping, jewelry, and intimidation. ) Schirripa even includes goomba do's and don'ts (never, ever criticize a goomba's mother or her gravy; always wear more jewelry than you think you need). With knockout photographs of Schirripa and his compares, and insider information on how to think goomba, speak goomba, cook and eat goomba, and even how to behave at goomba weddings and funerals, A Goomba's Guide to Life will show any wiseguy wannabe how to sing like a Soprano.

My Lobotomy

by Howard Dully Charles Fleming

Howard Dully was 12 years old when he was given a lobotomy. He was 56 years old when he found out why. The four decades in between tell a story of profound love and compassion. In 1960 Howard's father and stepmother delivered him into the hands of the man who had invented the 'ice pick' lobotomy. Expelled from the mainstream medical community, his once-popular procedure now a grisly medical relic, Dr Walter Freeman was eager to turn this temperamental 12-year-old into a submissive boy - especially after hearing the terrible lies his stepmother told about him. Howard, told he was going into the hospital for tests, was instead given electro-shock treatments and a transorbital lobotomy. It took him 40 years to recover. Howard Dully's escape from that dark place is a voyage of enormous hope and universal appeal.

My Lobotomy: A Memoir

by Howard Dully Charles Fleming

At twelve, Howard Dully was guilty of the same crimes as other boys his age: he was moody and messy, rambunctious with his brothers, contrary just to prove a point, and perpetually at odds with his parents. Yet somehow, this normal boy became one of the youngest people on whom Dr. Walter Freeman performed his barbaric transorbital--or ice pick--lobotomy. Abandoned by his family within a year of the surgery, Howard spent his teen years in mental institutions, his twenties in jail, and his thirties in a bottle. It wasn't until he was in his forties that Howard began to pull his life together. But even as he began to live the "normal" life he had been denied, Howard struggled with one question: Why? "October 8, 1960. I gather that Mrs. Dully is perpetually talking, admonishing, correcting, and getting worked up into a spasm, whereas her husband is impatient, explosive, rather brutal, won't let the boy speak for himself, and calls him numbskull, dimwit, and other uncomplimentary names." There were only three people who would know the truth: Freeman, the man who performed the procedure; Lou, his cold and demanding stepmother who brought Howard to the doctor's attention; and his father, Rodney. Of the three, only Rodney, the man who hadn't intervened on his son's behalf, was still living. Time was running out. Stable and happy for the first time in decades, Howard began to search for answers. "December 3, 1960. Mr. and Mrs. Dully have apparently decided to have Howard operated on. I suggested [they] not tell Howard anything about it." Through his research, Howard met other lobotomy patients and their families, talked with one of Freeman's sons about his father's controversial life's work, and confronted Rodney about his complicity. And, in the archive where the doctor's files are stored, he finally came face to face with the truth. Revealing what happened to a child no one--not his father, not the medical community, not the state--was willing to protect, My Lobotomy exposes a shameful chapter in the history of the treatment of mental illness. Yet, ultimately, this is a powerful and moving chronicle of the life of one man. Without reticence, Howard Dully shares the story of a painfully dysfunctional childhood, a misspent youth, his struggle to claim the life that was taken from him, and his redemption.

Nicky Deuce: Home for the Holidays

by Charles Fleming Steven R. Schirripa

If you ask Nicholas Borelli II--better known as Nicky Deuce--winter in New Jersey is awfully boring compared to summertime in Brooklyn, where he had the best two weeks of his life. Now it's cold out, he's back in school, and he has to live without Grandma Tutti's home cooked Italian meals and Uncle Frankie's funny tough-guy attitude. But not for long! Nicky's father is throwing a New Year's Eve party and the whole family is going to stay at their house and the gang from Brooklyn is coming to visit. By Christmas, Nicky's home is brimming with Brooklyn accents. Grandma Tutti wastes no time taking over the kitchen while Uncle Frankie charms the neighbors and cousin Tommy beats up Dirk Van Allen, the biggest jerk in the neighborhood. Suddenly Tommy becomes a local hero but he and Nicky also become the prime target of a bully's revenge. Nicky Deuce is about to find out that winter in New Jersey is anything but boring.

Nicky Deuce: Welcome to the Family

by Charles Fleming Steven R. Schirripa

It's July, and Nicholas Borelli II's parents are scheduled to spend two weeks on a cruise. Nicholas will spend those two weeks, as he does every summer, at Camp Wannameka. The night before he's to leave, however, there's a phone call: thanks to an explosion in the septic system, camp is canceled. The only place for Nicholas to go instead is to his grandmother's house in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, New York. Nicholas's father grew up in Brooklyn, but you'd hardly know it. An Italian dinner at Nicholas's house in the suburbs is whole wheat pasta, organic tomato sauce, and, if he's lucky, a tofu meatball. And Brooklyn? Well, Brooklyn is the place his father left and never talks about. Nicholas has never been there, and he doesn't want to go now. But when Nicholas tastes his grandma Tutti's meatballs for the first time, gets a nickname from his uncle Frankie, and makes a friend in the neighborhood, his feelings about Brooklyn-and family-begin to change.

Three Weeks in October: The Manhunt for the Serial Sniper

by Charles Fleming Charles A. Moose

In October 2002, ordinary Americans feared for their lives, too frightened to pump gas at the local station or allow their children to play outdoors. For twenty-three nightmarish days, a nation felt at the mercy of unknown killers who seemingly chose victims at random. Now, a year after those horrific events, comes a book by the man whose courage, integrity, and tenacious dedication helped finally to crack the case

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