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Showing 1 through 13 of 13 results

Blue Grass Champion (Harlequin Hullabaloo)

by Dorothy Lyons

After their parents' deaths, two sisters are determined to fulfill their father's dream of turning their farm into a well-known name in the Saddlebred world. Gail Carter's lovely chestnut filly looks like a world beater, yet when she enters the ring never places. Judy's gelding, Harlequin Hullabaloo, is perfect in Judy's eyes, yet no judge can see past his colorful pinto markings. With their two horses, one whose chances are unpromising and the other an obvious winner, they set out to be champions. Unfortunately, the winner isn't as obvious as she seems, and an unpromising horse becomes an astounding winner when Judy Carter breaks the prejudice against pinto Saddlebreds and has a chance to win the World Five-gaited Championships with her wildly colored Hullabaloo.

Blue Smoke

by Dorothy Lyons

Andrea Bard, daughter of Mrs. Bard of the Bar D ranch, wants a horse of her own. But with her father dead, and Mother trying to make it as a dude ranch there is too much work and no money for a horse. That is until an old man and a beautiful blue roan stallion appear at the gates one morning. The stallion, Blue Smoke, is a famous racer and fast as the wind, but gentle as a lamb when Andy handles him. Pops, Blue's owner has a weak heart and very little money but makes himself useful around the ranch and stays on as a permanent part of the family. Pops tells Andy that he wants her to own Blue Smoke, but Pops dies before telling Andy where Blue's registration papers are hiding. Can Andy find the papers before it is too late to keep her horse, her Blue Smoke. And can she get Blue's name and fame to get some publicity for the Bar D ranch's Dude business? What will Andy do if she can't keep Blue Smoke?

Bright Wampum

by Dorothy Lyons

The Big Sur region along the California coast was still untamed country when Meredith Moore and her family arrived one stormy night. Merry had always ridden and trained horses, and when--next morning--she discovered to her joyous excitement a band of Appaloosa horses running wild in the mountain meadows, she determined to gentle one of them. The beauty of the rugged coastal country, the warm friendships Merry made with their widely scattered neighbors, the fascination of learning about the Indians who had lived there in the distant past, stock riding and rodeo competitions--all these made Merry's adventure-filled first year in California a memorable one. And always in the background was the mystery surrounding the real owner of the Appaloosas--and Merry's secret yearning that one day Bright Wampum might be her own. Dorothy Lyons, a horsewoman of many years' experience, knows the Big Sur region intimately and has written a swiftly moving and compelling story that young readers will welcome eagerly.

Copper Khan (Connie McGuire #4)

by Dorothy Lyons

Connemara McGuire, well known readers of Golden Sovereign, Midnight Moon, and Silver Birch, is happily contemplating a long summer vacation her first day home from college, when a horse trailer is forced off the road near Shamrock Stables. Connie rushes out to help, and when one of the young thoroughbreds is about to be shot because of a broken leg, Connie pleads for a chance to save him and is given the horse by an owner whose only interest is in racing. This impulsive act leads Connie herself to the race tracks eventually. Copper Khan gives every indication of being a winner-with plenty of stamina, an unusually long stride and a fighting spirit. Slowly Copper Khan builds a fine reputation until his former owner, jealous of Connie's success, tries by fair means and foul to bar Copper Khan from the tracks. Just before the most important race of the season the Khan, who has been injured in a bad fight with Golden Sovereign, develops a painful swelling on his withers. Then it is that Connie calls upon the gypsies who had promised to help her whenever she was in need because she once had saved the lives of some gypsy children. All the excitement, anxiety, and thrill of horseracing and the gallantry of spirited horses are captured in a story which sweeps the reader along to the grand finale.

Dark Sunshine

by Dorothy Lyons

Two years before, horse-loving Blythe Hyland would have been thrilled with the news that the family was moving back to an Arizona ranch, but now--what difference did it make to her? What could a thin, listless girl, crippled by polio, do on a ranch? Then the haunting vision of Blind Man's Pocket, a deep spring-fed valley tucked away in a range of mountains, tempted her to try riding a horse again. And when she had conquered her initial panic, Blythe felt that it might be hers once more. It was in Blind Man's Pocket Blythe found Dark Sunshine, a magnificent wild mare that had been trapped by a landslide. From the moment she learned it was possible to rescue the buckskin, Blythe determined that, crutches or no, she would train and ride her. It was slow, often painful work for the crippled girl, but when an endurance ride offered Blythe her only chance to win athletic honors toward a scholarship, both horse and rider were ready for the grueling test. Dorothy Lyons' earlier books have established her as a favorite writer of horse stories for older girls. In this moving story of a girl whose courage overcame the handicap of a useless leg, she has created an inspiring book that young readers will remember.

The Devil Made the Small Town

by Dorothy Lyons

Once I said to Connie, my closest friend, "People keep saying I ought to write the story of the family, but I don't see how mine is any different from any others." She shot me a startled glance and after a moment said only, "Oh! brother!" Through the years my kin has urged me to put down some of the family anecdotes, all of which were told me by Mother whose prodigious memory gets most of the credit. Now at last in my seventy-fifth year I have done so lest they be lost with me and the young members be cheated of any feeling of family, or think that it sprang full-blown in the 20th century. In some instances I have dressed up these stories (or legends)--maybe fleshed them out is more accurate. The community where my family and I grew up could be Everytown or Anytown, U.S.A. Since those Toonerville cartoons of so long ago, the name epitomizes America's small towns and I have used it as such. I am sure there are errors and misstatements as in all works that depend on that frail instrument, the human memory, but I have kept it as accurate as I could. A few times I may have mixed names up harmlessly, and in some instances I have deliberately changed names to protect the guilty. Possibly the readers' biggest problem is that the entire work is organized by subject rather than chronology. This means sudden changes of time and place and, perforce, some shifting back and forth, but if you will just "roll with the punches" it will all blend into the whole. Bon appetit.

Golden Sovereign (Connie McGuire #3)

by Dorothy Lyons

Connie McGuire, glowing with pride in her two mares, Silver Birch and Midnight Moon, is equally happy with Silver Birch's first colt Sliver, soon named Golden Sovereign, for his beautiful palomino coat. Connie hasn't given up rescuing horses however, as when she goes into town to buy a dress for a Valentine's Day party she comes home with a battered, worn down neglected mare, which she bought at an auction to save from further abuse. Connie knows that this horse, though not pretty now, has beautiful breeding and must have at one time been quite a beauty, but how could she and Pete find out about Lady Luck's past? Her dreams and hopes of her new stable, Shamrock Stables, hinge on finding out about Lady Luck's past and on having Golden Sovereign as a gentle and majestic horse. But Sliver has developed bouts where he is anything but gentle, and at times is so dangerous even Connie fears he is turning into a killer. What is turning Golden Sovereign into a mean horse? Connie and Peter must work against a frightening deadline to solve the problem ... and to save their future! Can she pull off her dreams?

Java Jive

by Dorothy Lyons

Even though her family kept telling her they couldn't afford to buy a horse, it didn't prevent Ginny Atkins from dreaming about owning one, especially since there was an old corral that came with their new home in California. And the miracle did happen when a Morgan that had strayed out of its own pasture came into the corral. Ginny was allowed to keep Sugar on loan, because Sugar's original owner was grown up and the mare was kept for sentimental reasons only, but Ginny had to prove to her father that she could be thoughtful and reliable, not just a scatterbrain. Then came the wonderful day when Sugar foaled-- and there was Java Jive, a perfect colt, for Ginny to raise and train as her very own! Trail-riding, Gymkhana shows, and hard work to earn money to keep Java gave Ginny a busy time, but eventually her patience was rewarded when Java proved his worth during the terrors of a California earthquake. Dorothy Lyons' previous books, such as Blue Smoke, Golden Sovereign, and Midnight Moon, have won for her a special place among writers of horse stories. Young readers everywhere will welcome Ginny Atkins and her colt, Java Jive.

Midnight Moon (Connie McGuire #2)

by Dorothy Lyons

Connie McGuire, born and brought up on a farm, had a wonderful way with horses. She had her proved her ability with Silver Birch, an ownerless white mare who had run free for a year. Now she had a different problem with Midnight Moon whose so-called meanness had been caused by cruel treatment. If Connie can school her in the paces and behavior of a good riding horse, and prove her success by showing her before judges in an accredited horse show, she'll win her bet and keep her own mare, Silver Birch, safe. This is a story complete in itself, but readers of Silver Birch will be glad to meet the beautiful white mare again.

Pedigree Unknown

by Dorothy Lyons

Jill Howell's expert horsemanship and her good looks and vivacity have made her one of the most popular members of the Hotspur Hunt Club. Now her engagement to the most eligible bachelor in the club--handsome, aristocratic Hadley S. Winslow III--is the envy of her friends. Caught up in the fairy-tale excitement of the wedding preparations, Jill has little reason to argue with Hadley's insistence on "proper breeding" for people and animals alike until he reacts unsympathetically when her own background is painfully called into question. Impetuously she breaks the engagement. Trying to forget her unhappiness, Jill devotes her time and energy to rehabilitating a broken-down gelding she has rescued from its cruel owner, finding in the gray horse she calls Granite a striking parallel to her own situation. Just as she does not know her true parents, so is the horse's pedigree unknown. Under Jill's care and with the welcome help of her attractive new friend, Dirk Martin, Granite is soon able to hold his own against the finest thoroughbred hunters. In an absorbing, action-packed novel of a girl's love of horses and her struggle against self-doubt, Dorothy Lyons again demonstrates the skill that has made her a favorite author of horse stories. Her readers will applaud the satisfying conclusion in which Granite proves to Jill that a fancy pedigree is not essential to a true winner.

Red Embers

by Dorothy Lyons

This swiftly moving story of a girl who trains polo ponies, and plays an excellent game as well, will delight all horse lovers. Phil Blake--lucky enough to live on a California ranch--had raised and trained her favorite pony, Red Embers, from the time she was a tiny colt. Informal polo games at the ranch with Jon and Dave, the Randall twins, under the expert supervision of Phil's father and Mr. Randall, lead to Phil's acceptance by a Western women's team after stiff competition. At the end of a whirlwind season, Phil is finally chosen to play in an East-West tournament on Long Island. Riding Red Embers, she comes through with flying colors, and gains a coveted position on the All-American women's team. Good sportsmanship, keen rivalry, the breathless excitement of hard-played chukkers, and a real knowledge of horses make this an outstanding horse story for girls. Illustrated by Wesley Dennis

Silver Birch (Connie McGuire #1)

by Dorothy Lyons

This story of a girl and a horse is by an author experienced in riding and training horses. It takes place in a small Michigan town and the surrounding farm country. There are other girls who have horses too, and they all take part in good times and adventures, including starting a Girl Scout troop during a time when local troops are still a novelty across the country. But the story belongs to Connie and Silver Birch, the wild white mare who has roamed the countryside unmastered until Connie takes her in hand. There is a real quality of suspense in the struggle of wills between girl and horse before Connie's patient efforts are rewarded. "A sound knowledge of horsemanship displayed against a thoroughly American background."-New York Times.

Smoke Rings (Ginny Atkins #2)

by Dorothy Lyons

When Ginny Atkins, by quick thinking, saved an impulsive stranger and the handsome gray horse he could not control from a near fatal accident, she had no idea that this would change the next three years of her life. After the incident, Ginny suddenly found herself the new owner of Smoke Rings, Mr. Pollard's Thoroughbred hunter. And the improbable dream she had admitted only to herself-of trying for the U. S. Equestrian Olympic Team-came a step closer to reality. Coached by a former Olympic rider, Ginny devoted all her energies to achieving perfection of performance with Smoke Rings. But the road to the Olympics was demanding, grueling, and expensive. The relentless training required dedication to withstand its monotony, and the frustrations and sacrifices were not easy for a fun-loving high school senior. Dorothy Lyons, an expert horsewoman herself and the accomplished author of many horse stories for girls, has written an absorbing book, which reaches a dramatic climax at the 1960 Olympics in Rome. There, amid the colorful international hubbub, Ginny's long-treasured dream is realized against the impressive pageantry of the Seventeenth Olympiad.

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