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Showing 1 through 8 of 8 results

Learning Rails

by Simon St. Laurent Edd Dumbill

While most books written about Rails cater to programmers looking for information on data structures, Learning Rails targets web developers whose programming experience is tied directly to the Web. Rather than begin with the inner layers of a Rails web application--the models and controllers--this unique book approaches Rails development from the outer layer: the application interface. You'll learn how to create something visible with Rails before reaching the more difficult database models and controller code. With Learning Rails, you can start from the foundations of web design you already know, and then move more deeply into Ruby, objects, and database structures. This book will help you: Present web content by building an application with a basic view and a simple controller, while learning Ruby along the way Build forms and process their results, progressing from the simple to the more complex Connect forms to models by setting up a database, and use Rails' ActiveRecord to create code that maps to database structures Use Rails scaffolding to build applications from a view-centric perspective Add common web application elements such as sessions, cookies, and authentication Build applications that combine data from multiple tables Create simple but dynamic interfaces with Rails and Ajax Once you complete Learning Rails, you'll be comfortable working with the Rails web framework, and you'll be well on your way to becoming a Rails guru.

Learning Rails 3

by Eric J Gruber Edd Dumbill Simon St. Laurent

<p>If you&#8217;re a web developer or designer ready to learn Rails, this unique book is the ideal way to start. Rather than throw you into the middle of the framework&#8217;s Model-View-Controller architecture, <i>Learning Rails 3</i> works from the outside in. You&#8217;ll begin with the foundations of the Web you already know, and learn how to create something visible with Rails&#8217; view layer. <i>Then</i> you&#8217;ll tackle the more difficult inner layers: the database models and controller code. All you need to get started is HTML experience.</p>

Learning Rails: Live Edition

by Simon St. Laurent Edd Dumbill

Ready to learn Rails? Get up to speed using the framework's latest release. In this Live Edition, Learning Rails has been updated to cover Rails 2.3.5, making it an ideal guide for Rails beginners. Unlike most Rails books, Learning Rails is for web developers, and not for programmers. Rather than begin with the inner layers of a Rails web application -- the models and controllers -- this book approaches Rails development from the outer layer: the view side of an application. You'll start from the foundations of the Web you already know, and learn how to create something visible with Rails before reaching the more difficult database models and controller code. Each chapter includes exercises and review questions so you can test your understanding as you go. Present content by building an application with a basic view and a simple controller, while learning Ruby along the way Build forms and process their results, progressing from simple to more complex Connect forms to models by setting up a database, and use Rails' Active Record to create code that maps to database structures Use Rails scaffolding to build applications from a view-centric perspective Add common web application elements such as sessions, cookies, and authentication Build applications that combine data from multiple tables Create simple but dynamic interfaces with Rails and Ajax O'Reilly Live Edition books give you access to updates to topics in between editions of a book. A Live Edition is an electronic and print-on-demand version of the book that is updated when there is a significant change to the software or technology the book covers, keeping you on top of .X releases or major fixes.

Linux Unwired

by Edd Dumbill Brian Jepson Roger Weeks

In Linux Unwired , you'll learn the basics of wireless computing, from the reasons why you'd want to go wireless in the first place, to setting up your wireless network or accessing wireless data services on the road. The book provides a complete introduction to all the wireless technologies supported by Linux. You'll learn how to install and configure a variety of wireless technologies to fit different scenarios, including an office or home network and for use on the road. You'll also learn how to get Wi-Fi running on a laptop, how to use Linux to create your own access point, and how to deal with cellular networks, Bluetooth, and Infrared. Other topics covered in the book include: Connecting to wireless hotspots Cellular data plans you can use with Linux Wireless security, including WPA and 802.1x Finding and mapping Wi-Fi networks with kismet and gpsd Connecting Linux to your Palm or Pocket PC Sending text messages and faxes from Linux through your cellular phone Linux Unwired is a one-stop wireless information source for on-the-go Linux users. Whether you're considering Wi-Fi as a supplement or alternative to cable and DSL, using Bluetooth to network devices in your home or office,or want to use cellular data plans for access to data nearly everywhere, this book will show you the full-spectrum view of wireless capabilities of Linux, and how to take advantage of them.

Mono: A Developer's Notebook

by Edd Dumbill Niel M. Bornstein

The Mono Project is the much talked-about open source initiative to create a Unix implementation of Microsoft's .NET Development Framework. Its purpose is to allow Unix developers to build and deploy cross-platform .NET applications. The project has also sparked interest in developing components, libraries and frameworks with C#, the programming language of .NET. The controversy? Some say Mono will become the preferred platform for Linux development, empowering Linux/Unix developers. Others say it will allow Microsoft to embrace, extend, and extinguish Linux. The controversy rages on, but--like many developers--maybe you've had enough talk and want to see what Mono is really all about. There's one way to find out: roll up your sleeves, get to work, and see what you Mono can do. How do you start? You can research Mono at length. You can play around with it, hoping to figure things out for yourself. Or, you can get straight to work with Mono: A Developer's Notebook --a hands-on guide and your trusty lab partner as you explore Mono 1.0. Light on theory and long on practical application, Mono: A Developer's Notebook bypasses the talk and theory, and jumps right into Mono 1.0. Diving quickly into a rapid tour of Mono, you'll work through nearly fifty mini-projects that will introduce you to the most important and compelling aspects of the 1.0 release. Using the task-oriented format of this new series, you'll learn how to acquire, install, and run Mono on Linux, Windows, or Mac OS X. You'll work with the various Mono components: Gtk#, the Common Language Runtime, the class libraries (both .NET and Mono-provided class libraries), IKVM and the Mono C# compiler. No other resource will take you so deeply into Mono so quickly or show you as effectively what Mono is capable of. The new Developer's Notebooks series from O'Reilly covers important new tools for software developers. Emphasizing example over explanation and practice over theory, they focus on learning by doing--you'll get the goods straight from the masters, in an informal and code-intensive style that suits developers. If you've been curious about Mono, but haven't known where to start, this no-fluff, lab-style guide is the solution.

Planning for Big Data

by Edd Dumbill

In an age where everything is measurable, understanding big data is an essential. From creating new data-driven products through to increasing operational efficiency, big data has the potential to make your organization both more competitive and more innovative. As this emerging field transitions from the bleeding edge to enterprise infrastructure, it's vital to understand not only the technologies involved, but the organizational and cultural demands of being data-driven. Written by O'Reilly Radar's experts on big data, this anthology describes:The broad industry changes heralded by the big data era What big data is, what it means to your business, and how to start solving data problems The software that makes up the Hadoop big data stack, and the major enterprise vendors' Hadoop solutions The landscape of NoSQL databases and their relative merits How visualization plays an important part in data work

Programming Web Services with XML-RPC

by Edd Dumbill Joe Johnston Simon St. Laurent

XML-RPC, a simple yet powerful system built on XML and HTTP, lets developers connect programs running on different computers with a minimum of fuss. Java programs can talk to Perl scripts, which can talk to ASP applications, and so on. With XML-RPC, developers can provide access to functionality without having to worry about the system on the other end, so it's easy to create web services.

Programming Web Services with XML-RPC

by Edd Dumbill Joe Johnston Simon St. Laurent Dave Winer

Have you ever needed to share processing between two or more computers running programs written in different languages on different operating systems? Or have you ever wanted to publish information on the Web so that programs other than browsers could work with it? XML-RPC, a system for remote procedure calls built on XML and the ubiquitous HTTP protocol, is the solution you've been looking for. Programming Web Services with XML-RPC introduces the simple but powerful capabilities of XML-RPC, which lets you connect programs running on different computers with a minimum of fuss, by wrapping procedure calls in XML and establishing simple pathways for calling functions. With XML-RPC, Java programs can talk to Perl scripts, which can talk to Python programs, ASP applications, and so on. You can provide access to procedure calls without having to worry about the system on the other end, so it's easy to create services that are available on the Web. XML-RPC isn't the only solution for web services; the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) is another much-hyped protocol for implementing web services. While XML-RPC provides fewer capabilities than SOAP, it also has far fewer interoperability problems and its capabilities and limitations are much better understood. XML-RPC is also stable, with over 30 implementations on a wide variety of platforms, so you can start doing real work with it immediately. Programming Web Services with XML-RPC covers the details of five XML-RPC implementations, so you can get started developing distributed applications in Java, Perl, Python, ASP, or PHP. The chapters on these implementations contain code examples that you can use as the basis for your own work. This book also provides in-depth coverage of the XML-RPC specification, which is helpful for low-level debugging of XML-RPC clients and servers. And if you want to build your own XML-RPC implementation for another environment, the detailed explanations in this book will serve as a foundation for that work.

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