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Bacchae

by Robin Robertson Euripides Daniel Mendelsohn

A bold new translation of Euripides' shockingly modern classic work, from Forward Prize-winning poet Robin Robertson, with a new preface by bestselling and award-winning writer, critic, and translator Daniel MendelsohnThebes has been rocked by the arrival of Dionysus, the god of wine and ecstasy. Drawn by the god's power, the women of the city have rushed to worship him on the mountain, drinking and dancing with frenzied abandon.Pentheus, the king of Thebes, is furious, denouncing this so-called god as a charlatan and an insurgent. But no mortal can deny a god, much less one as powerful and seductive as Dionysus, who will exact a terrible revenge on Pentheus, drawing the king to his own tragic destruction.This stunning translation by award-winning poet Robin Robertson reinvigorates Euripides' masterpiece. Updating it for contemporary readers, he brings the ancient verse to fervid, brutal life, revealing a work of art as devastating and relevant today as it was in the fifth century BC.

Electra and Other Plays

by Euripides

Written during the fierce struggle for supremacy between Sparta and Euripides' native Athens, these five plays are haunted by the shadow of war - and in particular its impact on women. In Electra, the children of Agamemnon take bloody revenge on their mother for murdering their father after his return from Troy, and Suppliant Women depicts the grieving mothers of those killed in battle. The other plays deal with the aftermath of the Trojan War for the defeated survivors, as Andromache shows Hector's widow as a trophy of war in the house of her Greek captor, and Hecabe portrays a defeated queen avenging the murder of her last-remaining son, while Trojan Women tells of the plight of the city's women in the hands of the victors. Translated by John Davie and with an introduction and notes by Richard Rutherford

Euripides

by Euripides Paul Roche

A modern translation exclusive to signet From perhaps the greatest of the ancient Greek playwrights comes this collection of plays, including Alcestis, Hippolytus, Ion, Electra, Iphigenia at Aulis, Iphigenia Among the Taurians, Medea, The Bacchae, The Trojan Women, and The Cyclops.

Euripides I

by David Grene Euripides Richmond Lattimore Glenn W. Most Mark Griffith

Euripides I contains the plays "Alcestis," translated by Richmond Lattimore; "Medea," translated by Oliver Taplin; "The Children of Heracles," translated by Mark Griffith; and "Hippolytus," translated by David Grene. Sixty years ago, the University of Chicago Press undertook a momentous project: a new translation of the Greek tragedies that would be the ultimate resource for teachers, students, and readers. They succeeded. Under the expert management of eminent classicists David Grene and Richmond Lattimore, those translations combined accuracy, poetic immediacy, and clarity of presentation to render the surviving masterpieces of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in an English so lively and compelling that they remain the standard translations. Today, Chicago is taking pains to ensure that our Greek tragedies remain the leading English-language versions throughout the twenty-first century. In this highly anticipated third edition, Mark Griffith and Glenn W. Most have carefully updated the translations to bring them even closer to the ancient Greek while retaining the vibrancy for which our English versions are famous. This edition also includes brand-new translations of Euripides' Medea, The Children of Heracles, Andromache, and Iphigenia among the Taurians, fragments of lost plays by Aeschylus, and the surviving portion of Sophocles's satyr-drama The Trackers. New introductions for each play offer essential information about its first production, plot, and reception in antiquity and beyond. In addition, each volume includes an introduction to the life and work of its tragedian, as well as notes addressing textual uncertainties and a glossary of names and places mentioned in the plays. In addition to the new content, the volumes have been reorganized both within and between volumes to reflect the most up-to-date scholarship on the order in which the plays were originally written. The result is a set of handsome paperbacks destined to introduce new generations of readers to these foundational works of Western drama, art, and life.

Euripides I: Alcestis, The Medea, The Heracleidae, Hippolytus (The Complete Greek Tragedies #3)

by David Grene Euripides Rex Warner Ralph Gladstone Richmond Lattimore

Volume 3 of the Grene and Lattimore editions, which offer the most comprehensive selection of the Greek tragedies available in English.

Euripides II

by David Grene Euripides Richmond Lattimore Glenn W. Most Mark Griffith

Euripides II contains the plays "Andromache," translated by Deborah Roberts; "Hecuba," translated by William Arrowsmith; "The Suppliant Women," translated by Frank William Jones; and "Electra," translated by Emily Townsend Vermeule. Sixty years ago, the University of Chicago Press undertook a momentous project: a new translation of the Greek tragedies that would be the ultimate resource for teachers, students, and readers. They succeeded. Under the expert management of eminent classicists David Grene and Richmond Lattimore, those translations combined accuracy, poetic immediacy, and clarity of presentation to render the surviving masterpieces of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in an English so lively and compelling that they remain the standard translations. Today, Chicago is taking pains to ensure that our Greek tragedies remain the leading English-language versions throughout the twenty-first century. In this highly anticipated third edition, Mark Griffith and Glenn W. Most have carefully updated the translations to bring them even closer to the ancient Greek while retaining the vibrancy for which our English versions are famous. This edition also includes brand-new translations of Euripides' Medea, The Children of Heracles, Andromache, and Iphigenia among the Taurians, fragments of lost plays by Aeschylus, and the surviving portion of Sophocles's satyr-drama The Trackers. New introductions for each play offer essential information about its first production, plot, and reception in antiquity and beyond. In addition, each volume includes an introduction to the life and work of its tragedian, as well as notes addressing textual uncertainties and a glossary of names and places mentioned in the plays. In addition to the new content, the volumes have been reorganized both within and between volumes to reflect the most up-to-date scholarship on the order in which the plays were originally written. The result is a set of handsome paperbacks destined to introduce new generations of readers to these foundational works of Western drama, art, and life.

Euripides II: The Cyclops, Heracles, Iphigenia in Tauris, Helen (The Complete Greek Tragedies #4)

by David Grene Euripides Richmond Lattimore

Volume 2 of the Grene and Lattimore editions offers the most comprehensive selection of the Greek tragedies available in English comprising The Cyclops, Heracles, Iphigenia in Tauris, and Helen.

Euripides III: Hecuba, Andromache, The Trojan Women, Ion (The Complete Greek Tragedies #5)

by David Grene Euripides Richmond Lattimore

Volume 3 of the Grene and Lattimore editions offers the most comprehensive selection of the Greek tragedies available in English comprising Hecuba, Andromache, The Trojan Women, and Ion.

Euripides IV

by David Grene Euripides Richmond Lattimore Glenn W. Most Mark Griffith

Euripides IV contains the plays "Helen," translated by Richmond Lattimore; "The Phoenician Women," translated by Elizabeth Wyckoff; and "Orestes," translated by William Arrowsmith. Sixty years ago, the University of Chicago Press undertook a momentous project: a new translation of the Greek tragedies that would be the ultimate resource for teachers, students, and readers. They succeeded. Under the expert management of eminent classicists David Grene and Richmond Lattimore, those translations combined accuracy, poetic immediacy, and clarity of presentation to render the surviving masterpieces of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in an English so lively and compelling that they remain the standard translations. Today, Chicago is taking pains to ensure that our Greek tragedies remain the leading English-language versions throughout the twenty-first century. In this highly anticipated third edition, Mark Griffith and Glenn W. Most have carefully updated the translations to bring them even closer to the ancient Greek while retaining the vibrancy for which our English versions are famous. This edition also includes brand-new translations of Euripides' Medea, The Children of Heracles, Andromache, and Iphigenia among the Taurians, fragments of lost plays by Aeschylus, and the surviving portion of Sophocles's satyr-drama The Trackers. New introductions for each play offer essential information about its first production, plot, and reception in antiquity and beyond. In addition, each volume includes an introduction to the life and work of its tragedian, as well as notes addressing textual uncertainties and a glossary of names and places mentioned in the plays. In addition to the new content, the volumes have been reorganized both within and between volumes to reflect the most up-to-date scholarship on the order in which the plays were originally written. The result is a set of handsome paperbacks destined to introduce new generations of readers to these foundational works of Western drama, art, and life.

Euripides IV: Rhesus, The Suppliant Women, Orestes, Iphigenia in Aulis (The Complete Greek Tragedies #6)

by David Grene Euripides Richmond Lattimore

Volume 4 of the Grene and Lattimore editions offers the most comprehensive selection of the Greek tragedies available in English comprising Rhesus, The Suppliant Women, Orestes, and Iphigenia in Aulis.

Euripides V: Electra, The Phoenician Women, The Bacchae (The Complete Greek Tragedies #7)

by David Grene Euripides Richmond Lattimore

In nine paperback volumes, the Grene and Lattimore editions offer the most comprehensive selection of the Greek tragedies available in English. Over the years these authoritative, critically acclaimed editions have been the preferred choice of over three million readers for personal libraries and individual study as well as for classroom use.

Greek Tragedy

by Sophocles Aeschylus Euripides

Three masterpieces of classical tragedy Containing Aeschylus's Agamemnon, Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, and Euripides' Medea, this important new selection brings the best works of the great tragedians together in one perfect introductory volume. This volume also includes extracts from Aristophanes' comedy The Frogs and a selection from Aristotle's Poetics. Translated, edited and with notes by Simon Goldhill, Malcolm Heath, Shomit Dutta, Philip Vellacott, and E. F. Watling

Iphigenia among the Taurians

by Anne Carson Euripides

I am Iphigenia, daughter of the daughter of Tyndareus My father killed me Few contemporary poets elicit such powerful responses from readers and critics as Anne Carson. The New York Times Book Review calls her work "personal, necessary, and important," while Publishers Weekly says she is "nothing less than brilliant." Her poetry--enigmatic yet approachable, deeply personal yet universal in scope, wildly mutable yet always recognizable as her distinct voice--invests contemporary concerns with the epic resonance and power of the Greek classics that she has studied, taught, and translated for decades. Iphigenia among the Taurians is the latest in Carson's series of translations of the plays of Euripides. Originally published as part of the third edition of Chicago's Complete Greek Tragedies, it is published here as a stand-alone volume for the first time. In Carson's stunning translation, Euripides's play--full of mistaken identities, dangerous misunderstandings, and unexpected interventions by gods and men--is as fierce and fresh as any contemporary drama. Carson has accomplished one of the rarest feats of translation: maintaining fidelity to a writer's words even as she inflects them with her own unique poetic voice. Destined to become the standard translation of the play, Iphigenia among the Taurians is a remarkable accomplishment, and an unforgettable work of poetic drama.

Medea

by Euripides Diane Arnson Svarlien Robin Mitchell-Boyask

This is the Medea we have been waiting for. It offers clarity without banality, eloquence without pretension, meter without doggerel, accuracy without clumsiness. No English Medea can ever be Euripides', but this is as close as anyone has come so far, and a good deal closer than I thought anyone would ever come. Arnson Svarlien has shown herself exceedingly skillful in making Euripides sound Euripidean.--David M. Schaps, Bryn Mawr Classical Review

Medea

by Euripides translated by Oliver Taplin

Medea, whose magical powers helped Jason and the Argonauts take the Golden Fleece, remains one of the strongest female characters ever to appear on stage. In the play she kills her own children. Plays for Performance Series.

Medea

by Robin Robertson Euripides

Student edition of Euripedes' classic in which an abandoned, mistreated wife exacts revenge by killing her children.

Ten Plays

by Moses Hadas Euripides John Mclean

The first playwright of democracy, Euripides wrote with enduring insight and biting satire about social and political problems of Athenian life. In contrast to his contemporaries, he brought an exciting--and, to the Greeks, a stunning--realism to the "pure and noble form" of tragedy. For the first time in history, heroes and heroines on the stage were not idealized: as Sophocles himself said, Euripides shows people not as they ought to be, but as they actually are.

Ten Plays by Euripides

by Euripides

The first playwright of democracy, Euripides wrote with enduring insight and biting satire about social and political problems of Athenian life. In contrast to his contemporaries, he brought an exciting--and, to the Greeks, a stunning--realism to the "pure and noble form" of tragedy. For the first time in history, heroes and heroines on the stage were not idealized: as Sophocles himself said, Euripides shows people not as they ought to be, but as they actually are.

Showing 1 through 18 of 18 results

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