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Aeschylus's the Oresteia (Modern Critical Interpretations)

by Harold Bloom

Essays by John Jones, Anne Lebeck, Froma I. Zeitlin, Pierre Vidal-Naquet, W. B. Stanford, and John Herington.

Ahab (Modern Literary Characters)

by Harold Bloom

Critical extracts by Evert A. Duyckinck, D. H. Lawrence, Lewis Mumford, R. P. Blackmur, W. H. Auden, Lawrance Thompson, Marius Bewley, James Baird, Alfred Kazin, Denis Donoghue, A. R. Humphreys, Joyce Carol Oates, Raney Stanford, Martin Leonard Pops, Ann Douglas, Carolyn L. Karcher, David Simpson, Tony Magistrate, Joseph Allen Boone, David S. Reynolds, Wai-Chee Dimock, Bruce L. Grenberg, and Pamela Schirmeister Critical essays by F. O. Matthiessen, Maurice Friedman, Robert Zoellner, Bainard Cowan, Michael Paul Rogin, William B. Dillingham, Larry J. Reynolds, Neal L. Tolchin, Edward J. Ahearn, and Leo Bersani

Albert Camus (Modern Critical Views)

by Harold Bloom

Selected essays.

Alice Walker (Modern Critical Views)

by Harold Bloom

Selected essays.

American Religion: The Emergence of the Postchristian Nation

by Harold Bloom

How America has developed unique religious groups.

The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life

by Harold Bloom

"Literary criticism, as I attempt to practice it," writes Harold Bloom in The Anatomy of Influence, "is in the first place literary, that is to say, personal and passionate." For more than half a century, Bloom has shared his profound knowledge of the written word with students and readers. In this, his most comprehensive and accessible study of influence, Bloom leads us through the labyrinthine paths which link the writers and critics who have informed and inspired him for so many years. The result is "a critical self-portrait," a sustained meditation on a life lived with and through the great works of the Western canon:Why has influence been my lifelong obsessive concern? Why have certain writers found me and not others? What is the end of a literary life? Featuring extended analyses of Bloom's most cherished poets--Shakespeare, Whitman, and Crane--as well as inspired appreciations of Emerson, Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, Ashbery, and others, The Anatomy of Influence adapts Bloom's classic work The Anxiety of Influence to show us what great literature is, how it comes to be, and why it matters. Each chapter maps startling new literary connections that suddenly seem inevitable once Bloom has shown us how to listen and to read. A fierce and intimate appreciation of the art of literature on a scale that the author will not again attempt, The Anatomy of Influence follows the sublime works it studies, inspiring the reader with a sense of something ever more about to be.

Anton Chekhov (Modern Critical Views)

by Harold Bloom

Selected essays.

Arthur Miller (Modern Critical Views)

by Harold Bloom

Selected essays about the author and his works.

Arthur Miller's The Crucible (Notes)

by Harold Bloom

Selected essays.

Caddy Compson (Major Literary Characters)

by Harold Bloom

The character of Caddy Compson, a major character in Faulkner's work is carefully examined.

The Daemon Knows

by Harold Bloom

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERHailed as "the indispensable critic" by The New York Review of Books, Harold Bloom--New York Times bestselling writer and Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University--has for decades been sharing with readers and students his genius and passion for understanding literature and explaining why it matters. Now he turns at long last to his beloved writers of our national literature in an expansive and mesmerizing book that is one of his most incisive and profoundly personal to date. A product of five years of writing and a lifetime of reading and scholarship, The Daemon Knows may be Bloom's most masterly book yet. Pairing Walt Whitman with Herman Melville, Ralph Waldo Emerson with Emily Dickinson, Nathaniel Hawthorne with Henry James, Mark Twain with Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens with T. S. Eliot, and William Faulkner with Hart Crane, Bloom places these writers' works in conversation with one another, exploring their relationship to the "daemon"--the spark of genius or Orphic muse--in their creation and helping us understand their writing with new immediacy and relevance. It is the intensity of their preoccupation with the sublime, Bloom proposes, that distinguishes these American writers from their European predecessors. As he reflects on a lifetime lived among the works explored in this book, Bloom has himself, in this magnificent achievement, created a work touched by the daemon. Praise for Harold Bloom and The Daemon Knows"The capstone to a lifetime of thinking, writing and teaching . . . The primary strength of The Daemon Knows is the brilliance and penetration of the connections Bloom makes among the great writers of the past, the shrewd sketching of intellectual feuds or oppositions that he calls agons. . . . Bloom's books are like a splendid map of literature, a majestic aerial view that clarifies what we cannot see from the ground."--The Washington Post "Enrapturing . . . radiant . . . intoxicating . . . Harold Bloom, who bestrides our literary world like a willfully idiosyncratic colossus, belongs to the party of rapture."--Cynthia Ozick, The New York Times Book Review"The sublime The Daemon Knows is a veritable feast for the general reader (me) as well as the advanced (I assume) one."--John Ashbery"[Bloom] is, by any reckoning, one of the most stimulating literary presences of the last half-century."--Sam Tanenhaus, The New York Times Book Review"As always, Bloom conveys the intimate, urgent, compelling sense of why it matters that we read these canonical authors."--Kirkus Reviews (starred review)"Bloom thinks in the sweep of millennia, of intellectual patterns that unfold over centuries, of a vast and intricate labyrinth of interconnections between artists from Plato to Pater."--Michael Lindgren, The Washington Post"A colossus among critics."--Adam Begley, The New York Times Magazine"Probably the most celebrated literary critic in the United States."--Frank Kermode, The GuardianFrom the Hardcover edition.

Dónde se encuentra la sabiduría

by Harold Bloom

El prestigioso y conocido crítico literario Harold Bloom ha sido un apasionado de la lectura desde que era niño. Así pues, no es de extrañar que decidiera iniciar una nueva obra para explicarnos cómo los libros nos ayudan a vivir y a comprender nuestras vidas. Sin embargo, cuando Bloom llevaba más de medio libro escrito, tuvo un encuentro muy cercano con la muerte. Ya recuperado, se deshizo de todas las páginas que había redactado y volvió a empezar este libro con una nueva sensación de urgencia, apoyándose en algunos de los más grandes pensadores y escritores de Occidente para intentar descubrir dónde y cómo se encuentra la sabiduría. Bloom nos lleva desde la Biblia hasta el siglo XX en busca de las claves que atesora la literatura en las que encontrar sentido tanto a nuestra vida como a la muerte propia y la de nuestros seres queridos. A través de comparaciones entre el Libro de Job y el Eclesiastés, Platón y Homero, Cervantes y Shakespeare, Montaigne y Bacon, Johnson y Goethe, Emerson y Nietzsche, Freud y Proust, Bloom extrae las diversas -e incluso contrarias- formas de sabiduría que han moldeado nuestro pensamiento. ¿Dónde se encuentra la sabiduría? proporcionará a los lectores un mayor entendimiento y les conducirá con renovada pasión a las páginas de los escritores que más han contribuido a nuestra cultura. Un libro profundo en sí mismo que, sin duda, pasará a formar parte de nuestro canon literario.

Elie Wiesel's Night (Modern Critical Interpretations)

by Harold Bloom Elie Wiesel

Critical essays discuss Elie Wiesel's autobiographical novel about his time spent in Auschwitz as a teenager.

Eugene O'Neill's The Iceman Cometh (Modern Critical Interpretations)

by Harold Bloom

Literary interpretation in the form of critical essays on the Iceman Cometh.

F. Scott Fitzgerald (Modern Critical Views)

by Harold Bloom

Commentary on the life and works of the author.

The Fourth Dimension of a Poem: and Other Essays

by Harold Bloom M. H. Abrams

A new collection of essays by the legendary literary scholar and critic. In the year of his one-hundredth birthday, preeminent literary critic, scholar, and teacher M. H. Abrams brings us a collection of nine new and recent essays that challenge the reader to think about poetry in new ways. In these essays, three of them never before published, Abrams engages afresh with pivotal figures in intellectual and literary history, among them Kant, Keats, and Hazlitt. The centerpiece of the volume is Abrams's eloquent and incisive essay "The Fourth Dimension of a Poem" on the pleasure of reading poems aloud, accompanied by online recordings of Abrams's revelatory readings of poems such as William Wordsworth's "Surprised by Joy," Alfred Tennyson's "Here Sleeps the Crimson Petal," and Ernest Dowson's "Cynara." The collection begins with a foreword by Abrams's former student Harold Bloom.

Frankenstein

by Douglas Clegg Harold Bloom Mary Shelley

The story of Victor Frankenstein and the monstrous creature he created has held readers spellbound ever since it was published almost two centuries ago. On the surface, it is a novel of tense and steadily mounting horror; but on a more profound level, it offers searching illumination of the human condition in its portrayal of a scientist who oversteps the bounds of conscience, and of a monster brought to life in an alien world, ever more desperately attempting to escape the torture of his solitude. A novel of hallucinatory intensity, Frankenstein represents one of the most striking flowerings of the Romantic imagination. With a New Introduction by Douglas Clegg And an Afterword by Harold Bloom

Gerard Manley Hopkins (Modern Critical Views)

by Harold Bloom

The poetry is viewed in reference to his culture and surroundings, as well as within the context of his own life experience.

Henry James's Portrait of a Lady (Modern Critical Interpretations)

by Harold Bloom

Essays on The Portrait of a Lady by Richard Poirier, Laurence Bedwell Holland, Nina Baym, Elizabeth Allen, David M. Lubin, Maria Irene Ramalho de Sousa Santos, and Deborah Esch.

Henry the Fourth, Part One

by William Shakespeare Harold Bloom Professor Burton Raffel

While England is threatened by the Earl of Northumberland, Young Prince Hal cavorts in London's taverns, accompanied by the dissolute, entertaining Falstaff and his band of rogues. Much of this play's tension involves Prince Hal and Falstaff, as the former tries to live up to his duties and responsibilities. In creating Falstaff Shakespeare gave us one of the theater's most enduring and memorable characters.

How to Read and Why

by Harold Bloom

"Information is endlessly available to us; where shall wisdom be found?" is the critical question with which renowned literary critic Harold Bloom begins this impassioned book on the pleasures and benefits of reading well. For more than forty years, Bloom has transformed college students into lifelong readers with his unrivaled love for literature. Now, at a time when faster and easier electronic media threatens to eclipse the practice of reading, Bloom draws on his experience as critic, teacher, and prolific reader to plumb the great books for their sustaining wisdom. Shedding all polemic, Bloom addresses the solitary reader, who, he urges, should read for the purest of all reasons: to discover and augment the self. His ultimate faith in the restorative power of literature resonates on every page of this infinitely rewarding and important book.

James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Modern Critical Interpretations)

by Harold Bloom

Essays on Joyce's book by Hugh Kenner, Richard Ellmann, Anthony Burgess, Suzette Henke, Martin Price, John Paul Riquelme, Patrick Parrinder, and Michael Seidel.

James Joyce's Ulysses (Modern Critical Interpretations)

by Harold Bloom

Selected essays by Richard Ellman, Wolfgang Iser, A. Walton Litz, Dorrit Cohn, Hugh Kenner, Jean-Michel Rabate, Fritz Senn, Ramon Saldivar, and Cheryl Herr.

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