Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 1 through 21 of 21 results

Chinese Ghost Stories

by Lafcadio Hearn Victoria Cass

Chinese Ghost Stories is selection of the most entertaining traditional Chinese tales of the strange and fantastic. The perfect companion for readers seeking insights into the traditional Chinese world of ghosts, goblins and demons as well as anyone who just wants to feel a chill run down their spine on a dark, lonely night.

Chinese Ghost Stories

by Lafcadio Hearn Victoria Cass

Chinese Ghost Stories is selection of the most entertaining traditional Chinese tales of the strange and fantastic. The perfect companion for readers seeking insights into the traditional Chinese world of ghosts, goblins and demons as well as anyone who just wants to feel a chill run down their spine on a dark, lonely night.

Chinese Ghost Stories

by Lafcadio Hearn Victoria Cass

Chinese Ghost Stories is Lafcadio Hearn's personal selection of the most entertaining Chinese traditional tales of the strange and fantastic. Hearn had a great affinity for the traditional ghost stories of China, and these stories clearly inspired him as he penned subsequent works. Set in richly atmospheric locales, these tales speak of heroic sacrifice, chilling horror, eerie beauty and otherworldly intervention.This completely reset and pinyin-converted edition of Hearn's classic work contains a new foreword by Victoria Cass, which places the stories, their author, and his love for the strange and mysterious into perspective. If you're seeking insights into the traditional Chinese world of ghosts, goblins and demons--or just want to feel a chill run down your spine on a dark and lonely night--then this book is the perfect companion.Stories include:The Soul of the Great BellThe Story of Ming YiThe Legend of Zhi NuThe Return of Yan ZhenjingThe Tradition of the Tea PlantThe Tale of the Porcelain God

Gleanings in Buddha-Fields

by Lafcadio Hearn

Lafcadio Hearn's books continue to charm and captivate readers, as the exotic subjects about which he wrote charmed and captivated him. Gleanings In Buddha-Fields presents more Hearn magic as he enters into the spirit of Buddhism asthough he were born into it. "I an individual," he writes, "an individualsoul! Nay, I am a population-a population unthinkable for multitude, even by groups of a thousand millions! Generations of generations, I am, aeons of aeons! Countless times the concourse now making me has been scattered, and mixed withother scatterings. Of what concern, then, the next disintegration?" (Shades of Walt Whitman!) Hearn says that if he were a god, dwelling in some old Izumo shrine on the summit of a hill, then "as air to the bird, as water to the fish, so would all substance be permeable to the essence of me. I should pass at will into the walls of my dwelling to swim in the long gold bath of a sunbeam, to thrill in the heart of a flower, to ride on the neck of a dragonfly." He writes of a trip to Kyoto, telling of hazy autumn rice fields, with dragonflies darting over the drooping grain; maples crimsoning above a tremendous gorge; ranges of peaks steeped in morning mist; and a peasant's cottage perched on the verge of some dizzy mountain road. Also, there are fine bits of realism, such as a cat seizing a mouse in the act of stealing the offerings placed in a Buddhist household shrine. In the chapter "Dust," Hearn tells of a children's playground, and says that children in all countries play at death. But the idea of ceasing to exist could not possibly enter a child's mind: the butterflies and birds, the flowers, the foliage, the sweet summer itself, only play at dying-they seem to go, but they all come back again after the snow is gone. "The real sorrow and fear of death arise in us only after the slow accumulation of experience with doubt and pain; and these little boys and girls being Japanese and Buddhists will never, in any event, feel about death just as you and I do . . . they have died millions of times already, and have forgotten the trouble of it, much as one forgets the pain of successive toothaches." In "Nirvana," Hearn writes that Buddhism, recognizing no permanency, no finite stabilities, no distinction of character or class or race, except as passing phenomena, is essentially the religion of tolerance. This thought-provoking reprint of an old favorite will delight people of all races and creeds.

Gleanings in Buddha-Fields

by Lafcadio Hearn

Lafcadio Hearn's books continue to charm and captivate readers, as the exotic subjects about which he wrote charmed and captivated him. Gleanings In Buddha-Fields presents more Hearn magic as he enters into the spirit of Buddhism asthough he were born into it. "I an individual," he writes, "an individualsoul! Nay, I am a population-a population unthinkable for multitude, even by groups of a thousand millions! Generations of generations, I am, aeons of aeons! Countless times the concourse now making me has been scattered, and mixed withother scatterings. Of what concern, then, the next disintegration?" (Shades of Walt Whitman!) Hearn says that if he were a god, dwelling in some old Izumo shrine on the summit of a hill, then "as air to the bird, as water to the fish, so would all substance be permeable to the essence of me. I should pass at will into the walls of my dwelling to swim in the long gold bath of a sunbeam, to thrill in the heart of a flower, to ride on the neck of a dragonfly." He writes of a trip to Kyoto, telling of hazy autumn rice fields, with dragonflies darting over the drooping grain; maples crimsoning above a tremendous gorge; ranges of peaks steeped in morning mist; and a peasant's cottage perched on the verge of some dizzy mountain road. Also, there are fine bits of realism, such as a cat seizing a mouse in the act of stealing the offerings placed in a Buddhist household shrine. In the chapter "Dust," Hearn tells of a children's playground, and says that children in all countries play at death. But the idea of ceasing to exist could not possibly enter a child's mind: the butterflies and birds, the flowers, the foliage, the sweet summer itself, only play at dying-they seem to go, but they all come back again after the snow is gone. "The real sorrow and fear of death arise in us only after the slow accumulation of experience with doubt and pain; and these little boys and girls being Japanese and Buddhists will never, in any event, feel about death just as you and I do . . . they have died millions of times already, and have forgotten the trouble of it, much as one forgets the pain of successive toothaches." In "Nirvana," Hearn writes that Buddhism, recognizing no permanency, no finite stabilities, no distinction of character or class or race, except as passing phenomena, is essentially the religion of tolerance. This thought-provoking reprint of an old favorite will delight people of all races and creeds.

Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan

by Lafcadio Hearn Donald Richie

As an interpreter of Japan to the West, Lafcadio Hearn was without parallel in his time. His numerous books about that country were read with a fascination that was a tribute to his keen powers of observation and the vividness of his descriptions. Today, even though Japan has changed greatly from what it was when he wrote about it, his writing is still valid, for it captures the essence of the country-an essence that has actually changed a good deal less than outward appearances might suggest. In a word, the Japanese character and the Japanese tradition are still fundamentally the same as Hearn found them to be, and for this reason his books are still extremely revealing to readers in the West.Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan combines the two volumes of a work that first appeared in 1894. Its title is apt, for the book takes the reader into a world that few Westerners saw in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Here are the customs, the superstitions, the charming scenery, the revelations of Japanese character, and all the other elements that Hearn found so bewitching. Here, for example, are essays on such subjects as the Japanese garden, the household shrine, the festivals, and the bewildering Japanese smile-all aspects of Japanese life that have endured in spite of the changes that have taken place during the modernization of Japan.In his preface to the book, Hearn writes: "This is the life of which a foreign observer can never weary, if fortunate and sympathetic enough to enter into it...Each day, while the years pass, there will be revealed to him, some strange and unexpected beauty in it." It is fortunate indeed that he was able to bring to his readers so much of this "strange and unsuspected beauty."

In Ghostly Japan

by Lafcadio Hearn

In Ghostly Japan collects twelve stories from celebrated author Lafcadio Hearn. Some of these stories are ghostly and ghastly, while others are wonderfully benign. Whether he's telling a ghost story or explaining a Buddhist proverb, Hearn's writings are never less than enthralling.

In Ghostly Japan

by Lafcadio Hearn

In Ghostly Japan collects twelve stories from celebrated author Lafcadio Hearn. Some of these stories are ghostly and ghastly, while others are wonderfully benign. Whether he's telling a ghost story or explaining a Buddhist proverb, Hearn's writings are never less than enthralling.

Kotto

by Lafcadio Hearn Genjiro Yeto

The first Tuttle edition of Kotto was published in print form in 1972Japanese curios, with sundry cobwebs, excite the curiosity and imagination of a master spinner of tales, and the result is Kotto, another Lafcadio Hearn classic about old Japan. Here Hearn spins tales from old Japanese books to illustrate some strange beliefs. They are only curios, he says laconically, but some of these legends will make your spine tingle and your heart trip faster, like the one about a waterfall called Yurei-Daki, or the Cascade of Ghosts. The ghostswere as real as their warnings, but a bold woman failed to heed them-a horrible mistake. Hearn could also find in the commonplace the stuff of which imperishable literature is spun. A drop of dew hangs quivering on the bamboo lattice of his study window. Its tiny sphere repeats the colors of the morning-of sky and field and far-off trees, of a cottage with children at play. But much more than the visible world is imaged by that dewdrop: the world invisible, of infinite mystery, is likewise repeated. Buddhism finds in such a dewdrop the symbol of that other microcosm called the Soul. "Soon that tiny globe of light, with all its fairy tints and topsy-turvy picturings, will have vanished away. . . . Between the vanishing of the drop and the vanishing of the man, what difference?" And what becomes of the dewdrop? "By the great sun its atoms are separated and lifted and scattered. To cloud and earth, to river and seathey go; and out of land and stream and sea again they will be updrawn, only to fall and to scatter anew. They will creep in opalescent mists, they will whiten in frost and hail and snow, they will reflect again the forms and colors of the macrocosm. . . . For each one of them must combine again with countless kindred atoms for the making of other drops, drops of dew and rain and sap, ofblood and sweat and tears." Almost half a century later Sir Winston Churchill used a similar expression.In "The Eater of Dreams" there is a long list of evil Wonders, and the signs of their presence. But "Fireflies" produces a warm glow in the hearts of its readers. These friendly little insects have been celebrated in Japanese poetry from ancient times; and, as Hearn points out, frequent mention is made of them in early classical prose. A chapter of the famous novel Genji Monogatari is entitled "Fireflies." The author tells how a certain noble person was enabled to obtain one glimpse of a lady's face in the dark by the device of catching and suddenly liberating a number of fireflies. This glowing Hearn gem is certain to attract many readers.

Kwaidan

by Lafcadio Hearn

"Kwaidan" translates from the Japanese as weird tales, which perfectly describes these haunting stories.This collection of supernatural tales includes a musician called upon to perform for the dead, man-eating goblins, and insects who uncannily mimic human behavior. A perfect treat for fans of the strange and otherworldly.

Kwaidan

by Lafcadio Hearn

"Kwaidan" translates from the Japanese as weird tales, which perfectly describes these haunting stories.This collection of supernatural tales includes a musician called upon to perform for the dead, man-eating goblins, and insects who uncannily mimic human behavior. A perfect treat for fans of the strange and otherworldly.

Kwaidan

by Lafcadio Hearn

Known primarily as an early interpreter of Japanese culture and customs, the famous writer Lafcadio Hearn also wrote ghost stories--"delicate, transparent, ghostly sketches"--about his adopted land. Many of the stories found in Kwaidan, "stories and studies of strange things," are based on Japanese tales of long ago told to him by his wife; others possibly have a Chinese origin. All have been re-colored and reshaped by Hearn's inimitable hand. Some critics attribute Hearn's fascination with eerie tales to his partial blindness. Whatever its roots, he was clearly drawn to the hidden realms of the spirit world and to strange facts and marvels. In this collection of unforgettably haunting stories, Hearn brings together "the meeting of three ways"--the austere dreams of India, the subtle beauty of Japan and the relentless science of the Western world.This collection of supernatural tales includes:A musician called upon to perform for the deadMan-eating goblinsInsects who uncannily mimic human behaviorA perfect treat for fans of the strange and otherworldly.

Lafcadio Hearn's Japan

by Lafcadio Hearn Donald Richie

Over one hundred years after his death, author, translator and educator Lafcadio Hearn remains one of the best-known Westerners ever to make Japan his home. His prolific writings on things Japanese helped shape Western views on Japan well into the twentieth century.This masterful anthology compiled by Donald Richie is organized into two parts.Part One, "The Land", chronicles Hearn's early years, when he wrote primarily about the appearance of his new home.Part Two, "The People", records the author's later years, when he came to terms with the Japanese themselves.

Lafcadio Hearn's Japan

by Lafcadio Hearn Donald Richie

Over one hundred years after his death, author, translator and educator Lafcadio Hearn remains one of the best-known Westerners ever to make Japan his home. His prolific writings on things Japanese helped shape Western views on Japan well into the twentieth century.This masterful anthology compiled by Donald Richie is organized into two parts.Part One, "The Land", chronicles Hearn's early years, when he wrote primarily about the appearance of his new home.Part Two, "The People", records the author's later years, when he came to terms with the Japanese themselves.

Out of the East

by Lafcadio Hearn

In works like these Hearn perceived and captured the essence of Japan as it was in the days when he fell under its spell and made Japan his adopted country.

Out of the East

by Lafcadio Hearn

In works like these Hearn perceived and captured the essence of Japan as it was in the days when he fell under its spell and made Japan his adopted country.

Shadowings

by Lafcadio Hearn

Shadowings is made up of three parts: "Stories from Strange Books," which presents six old Japanese tales; "Japanese Studies," in which Hearn explores the lore of his adopted country; and "Fantasies," a group of essays in which he gives free rein to his wide-ranging imagination. All in all, it is a delightful collection of curiosities and fancies.

Shadowings

by Lafcadio Hearn

Shadowings is made up of three parts: "Stories from Strange Books," which presents six old Japanese tales; "Japanese Studies," in which Hearn explores the lore of his adopted country; and "Fantasies," a group of essays in which he gives free rein to his wide-ranging imagination. All in all, it is a delightful collection of curiosities and fancies.

The Temptation of Saint Anthony

by Lafcadio Hearn Gustave Flaubert Michel Foucault

A book that deeply influenced the young Freud and was the inspiration for many artists, The Temptation of Saint Anthony was Flaubert's lifelong work, thirty years in the making. Based on the story of the third-century saint who lived on an isolated mountaintop in the Egyptian desert, it is a fantastical rendering of one night during which Anthony is besieged by carnal temptations and philosophical doubt. This Modern Library Paperback Classic reproduces the distinguished Lafcadio Hearn translation, which translator Richard Sieburth calls "a splendid period piece from one of America's premier translators of nineteenth-century French prose. In Lafcadio Hearn's Latinate rendering, Flaubert's experimental drama of the modern consciousness reads as weirdly as its oneiric original."

Showing 1 through 21 of 21 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.