Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 1 through 10 of 10 results

Eclipse of God

by Martin Buber Leora Batnitzky

Biblical in origin, the expression "eclipse of God" refers to the Jewish concept of hester panim, the act of God concealing his face as a way of punishing his disobedient subjects. Though this idea is deeply troubling for many people, in this book Martin Buber uses the expression hopefully--for a hiding God is also a God who can be found. First published in 1952, Eclipse of God is a collection of nine essays concerning the relationship between religion and philosophy. The book features Buber's critique of the thematically interconnected--yet diverse--perspectives of Soren Kierkegaard, Hermann Cohen, C.G. Jung, Martin Heidegger, and other prominent modern thinkers. Buber deconstructs their philosophical conceptions of God and explains why religion needs philosophy to interpret what is authentic in spiritual encounters. He elucidates the religious implications of the I-Thou, or dialogical relationship, and explains how the exclusive focus on scientific knowledge in the modern world blocks the possibility of a personal relationship with God. Featuring a new introduction by Leora Batnitzky, Eclipse of God offers a glimpse into the mind of one of the modern world's greatest Jewish thinkers.


by Martin Buber

Famous Zionist philosopher Martin Buber introduces the Western audience in his modern masterpiece. This book is a result of forty years of study, and Buber interprets the ideas and motives that underlie the great Jewish religious movement of Hasidism and its creator, Baal-Shem. Buber's interpretation of Hasidic stories and teachings influenced the revival of it's practices in a new generation to turn to Hasidic teachings, and his collection Hasidism continues to affect Jewish scholarship worldwide. With his lasting work in both Hasidism and Zionism, Buber imagined a renewal in the Jewish faith, and his philosophies and idealisms enrich the pages of this book, making it a must-read for any Jewish or religious scholar.


by Martin Buber

The popular communal mysticism known as Hasidism transformed religious thought and practice among East European Jews during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Martin Buber, the greatest Jewish philosopher and religious thinker of the mid-twentieth century, single-handedly transformed Hasidism from an all-but-forgotten trend into one of the great spiritual movements of the modern world. This collection features some of Professor Buber's most important essays--profound yet simple meditations that constitute an incomparable distillation of Hasidic wisdom.

Hasidism and Modern Man

by Martin Buber David Biale Maurice Friedman

Hasidism, a controversial, mystical-religious movement of Eastern European origin, has posed a serious challenge to mainstream Judaism from its earliest beginnings in the middle of the eighteenth century. Decimated by the Holocaust, it has risen like a phoenix from the ashes and has reconstituted itself as a major force in the world of ultra-Orthodox Judaism. Philosopher Martin Buber found inspiration in its original tenets and devoted much of his career to making its insights known to a wide readership. First published in 1958, Hasidism and Modern Man examines the life and religious experiences of Hasidic Jews, as well as Buber's personal response to them. From the autobiographical "My Way to Hasidism," to "Hasidism and Modern Man," and "Love of God and Love of Neighbor," the essays span nearly half a century and reflect the evolution of Buber's religious philosophy in relation to the Hasidic movement. Hasidism and Modern Man remains prescient in its portrayal of a spiritual movement that brings God down to earth and makes possible a modern philosophy in which the human being becomes sacred.

I and Thou

by Walter Kaufmann Martin Buber

The classic work on philosophy and religion, with a wealth of footnotes to clarify obscurities.

A Land of Two Peoples: Martin Buber on Jews and Arabs

by Martin Buber

Theologian, philosopher, and political radical, Martin Buber (1878-1965) was actively committed to a fundamental economic and political reconstruction of society as well as the pursuit of international peace. In his voluminous writings on Arab-Jewish relations in Palestine, Buber united his religious and philosophical teachings with his politics, which he felt were essential to a life of public dialogue and service to God. Edited with commentary by Paul Mendes-Flohr

The Letters of Martin Buber

by Martin Buber

"No matter how brilliant it may be, the human intellect that wishes to keep to a plane above the events of the day is not really alive," wrote Martin Buber in 1932. The correspondence of Martin Buber reveals a personality passionately involved in all the cultural and political events of his day. Drawn from the three-volume German edition of his correspondence, this collection includes letters both to and from the leading personalities of his day--Albert Einstein and Albert Schweitzer, Hemann Hesse, Franz Kafka, and Stefan Zweig, Theodor Herzl, Chaim Weizmann, David Ben-Gurion, S.Y. Agnon, Gershom Scholem, and Franz Rosenzweig. These exchanges capture the dynamics of seven decades of lived history, reflected through the eyes of a man who was the conscience of his generation. One of the leading spiritual thinkers of the twentieth century, Buber is best known for his work of religious existentialism, I and Thou. A prime mover in the German-Jewish renaissance of the 1920s, he taught comparative religion and Jewish ethics at the University of Frankfurt. Fleeing the Nazis in 1938, Buber made his home in Jerusalem, where he taught social philosophy at the Hebrew University. As resident sage of Jerusalem, he developed an international reputation and following, and carried on a vigorous correspondence on social, political, and religious issues until the end of his life. Included in this collection are Buber's exchanges with many Americans in the latter part of his life: Will Herberg, Walter Kaufmann, Maurice Friedman, Malcolm Diamond, and other individuals who sought his advice and guidance. In the voices of these letters, a full-blooded portrait emerges of a towering intellect ever striving to live up to philosophy of social engagement.

On Judaism

by Martin Buber

Edited by Nahum N. Glatzer With a new Foreword by Rodger Kamenetz "The question I put before you, as well as before myself, is the question of the meaning of Judaism for the Jews. Why do we call ourselves Jews? I want to speak to you not of an abstraction but of your own life . . . its authenticity and essence. " With these words, Martin Buber takes us on a journey into the heart of Judaism--its spirit, vision, and relevance to modern life.

Pointing the Way

by Martin Buber Maurice S. Friedman

"These essays, written between 1909 and 1954 and first published as a collection in 1957, in which the eminent philosopher relates the 'I-Thou' dialogue to such varied fields as religion, social thought, philosophy, myth, drama, literature and art, reveal Buber in the process of responding to the crises and challenges of the 20th century and enable the reader to follow his lifelong struggles toward 'authentic existence.'" -Back Cover

Tales of the Hasidim

by Martin Buber

This new paperback edition brings together volumes one and two of Buber's classic work Takes of the Hasidim, with a new foreword by Chaim Potok. Martin Buber devoted forty years of his life to collecting and retelling the legends of Hasidim. "Nowhere in the last centuries," wrote Buber in Hasidim and Modern Man, "has the soul-force of Judaism so manifested itself as in Hasidim... Without an iota being altered in the law, in the ritual, in the traditional life-norms, the long-accustomed arose in a fresh light and meaning."These marvelous tales--terse, vigorous, often cryptic--are the true texts of Hasidim. The hasidic masters, of whom these tales are told, are full-bodied personalities, yet their lives seem almost symbolic. Through them is expressed the intensity and holy joy whereby God becomes visible in everything.

Showing 1 through 10 of 10 results


Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.