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After the Stroke

by May Sarton

An intimate and uplifting memoir chronicling May Sarton's efforts to regain her health, art, and sense of self after suffering from a stroke Feeling cut off and isolated--from herself most of all--after suffering a stroke at age 73, May Sarton began a journal that helped her along the road to recovery. She wrote every day without fail, even if illness sometimes prevented her from penning more than a few lines. From her sprawling house off the coast of Maine, Sarton shares the quotidian details of her life in the aftermath of what her doctors identified as a small brain hemorrhage. What they did not tell her was the effect it would have on her life and work. Sarton's journal is filled with daily accounts of the weather, her garden, beloved pets, and her concerns about losing psychic energy and no longer feeling completely whole. A woman who had always prized her solitude, Sarton experiences feelings of intense loneliness. When overwhelmed by the past, she tries to find comfort in soothing remembrances of her travels, and struggles to learn to live moment by moment. As Sarton begins to regain her strength, she rejoices in the life "recaptured and in all that still lies ahead." Interspersed with heartfelt recollections about fellow poets and aspiring writers who see in Sarton a powerful muse, this is a wise and moving memoir about life after illness.

Anger

by May Sarton

May Sarton's sharp exploration of how men and women love--and how they clash--as shown through one tempestuous relationship Ned Fraser has never seen himself as a husband. His distinguished job at a Boston bank has kept him satisfied while a string of failed love affairs has concerned him little. But no woman has ever affected him the way Anna Lindstrom does. A concert singer of immense charm and beauty, Anna is possessed of a vibrant presence that stands in stark contrast to Ned's diffidence. And yet despite herself, she can't help but be drawn to the persistent suitor who plies her with flowers. Their courtship is short and intense, and the spark that brought them together fuels not only their love, but also a needling undercurrent of volatility. Her passion and narcissism agitate him, while his tempered restraint bores her into resentment. Their opposing personalities lead to anger and conflict, and ultimately to a crossroads that will either tear their young marriage apart or weave it back together, stronger than ever.

As Does New Hampshire

by May Sarton

May Sarton's exquisitely rendered tribute to her home state Over the course of her career, May Sarton wrote on a range of topics and places in both prose and poetry, and traveled across the world in search of new subjects. There is, however, one place that she always returned to in the end: Nelson, New Hampshire. Written in honor of the town's bicentennial, As Does New Hampshire follows the course of a year in this rural hamlet. Sarton gracefully describes the ever-present role of nature, which always reminds humans that their presence on earth is temporary. She conveys both the beauty and the difficulty of a New England winter, and the full bloom of spring and summer. Above all, though, As Does New Hampshire is a lasting tribute not only to Sarton's home, but to the greater concept of home found in the heart of every reader.

As We Are Now

by May Sarton

A powerful and beautiful novella of one woman, consigned to a dreary retirement home, who wages a defiant battle against the dulling forces around herAfter seventy-six-year-old Caro Spencer suffers a heart attack, her family sends her to a private retirement home to wait out the rest of her days. Her memory growing fuzzy, Caro decides to keep a journal to document the daily goings-on--her feelings of confinement and boredom; her distrust of the home's owner, Harriet Hatfield, and her daughter, Rose; her pity for the more incapacitated residents; her resentment of her brother, John, for leaving her alone. The journal entries describe not only her frustrations, but also small moments of beauty--found in a welcome visit from her minister, or in watching a bird in the garden. But as she writes, Caro grows increasingly sensitive to the casual atrocities of retirement-home life. Even as she acknowledges her mind is beginning to fail, she is determined to fight back against the injustices foisted upon the home's occupants.This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.

As We Are Now: A Novel

by May Sarton

An elderly woman remembers past events while in a nursing home. Sarton uses her descriptive and narrative skills to present the dreary and depressing life of the woman in the book. Sarton also uses her cunning flashbacks to illustrate the woman's earlier life.

At Eighty-Two

by May Sarton

May Sarton confronts the pleasures and compromises of old age in this deeply moving memoir completed a few months before she diedIn this poignant and fearless account, Sarton chronicles the struggles of life at eighty-two. She juxtaposes the quotidian details of life--battling a leaky roof, sharing an afternoon nap with her cat, the joy of buying a new mattress--with lyrical musings about work, celebrity, devoted friends, and the limitations wrought by the frailties of age. She creates poetry out of everyday existence, whether bemoaning a lack of recognition by the literary establishment or the devastation wrought by a series of strokes. Incapacitated by illness, Sarton relies on friends for the little things she always took for granted. As she becomes more and more aware of "what holds life together in a workable whole," she takes solace in flowers and chocolate and reading letters from devoted fans. This journal takes us into the heart and mind of an extraordinary artist and woman, and is a must-read for Sarton devotees and anyone facing the reality of growing older.This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.

At Eighty-Two: A Journal

by May Sarton

The award-winning poet presents a daily record of her thoughts and feelings during her eighty-second year, reflecting on her youth, the vicissitudes of her cat, the rigors of a Maine winter, and the mystery of old age.

At Seventy

by May Sarton

May Sarton's honest and engrossing journal of her seventieth year, spent living and working on the Maine coast May Sarton's journals are a captivating look at a rich artistic life. In this, her ode to aging, she savors the daily pleasures of tending to her garden, caring for her dogs, and entertaining guests at her beloved Maine home by the sea. Her reminiscences are raw, and her observations are infused with the poetic candor for which Sarton--over the course of her decades-long career--became known. An enlightening glimpse into a time--the early 1980s--and an age, At Seventy is at once specific and universal, providing a unique window into septuagenarian life that readers of all generations will enjoy. At times mournful and at others hopeful, this is a beautiful memoir of the year in which Sarton, looking back on it all, could proclaim, "I am more myself than I have ever been."

At Seventy: A Journal

by May Sarton

Sarton describes life in New England in the earlier 80s through a series of journal entries detailing her dealings in the garden and with others.

The Birth of a Grandfather

by May Sarton

May Sarton's 7th novel is about marriage, family, life's cycles, and the regeneration of love Frances and Sprig Wyeth have come to the old Wyeth house in Maine for the summer. In a house filled with lively members of her husband's extended family, Frances feels alienated from everyone, including Sprig. A night of passion breaks down the growing barriers between them, yet Frances feels it is more a "desperate moment of possession" than the true "flowing together of two deeply joined selves." And although she's the mother of two grown children, in many ways she still feels like a child, waiting to mature into adulthood. Sprig adores his wife. But now, at 50, he both wants her and wants her to leave. He longs for freedom and is haunted by memories of his youth. His son, Caleb, is hostile; his unmarried daughter, Betsy, is pregnant. Sprig feels as if he is "walking in the dark," and has begun to doubt himself as a husband, father, and friend. The Birth of a Grandfather is the story of a marriage and a family, of friendship and the love that reminds us that we are alive and that we matter. It's about the small domestic moments and the defining events that make up a life.

The Bridge of Years

by May Sarton

May Sarton's celebrated novel of family, philosophy, and survival, set between the two great wars that cleaved Europe in two In the wake of the First World War, life for the Duchesnes goes on almost as it always has. Situated near a vegetable garden, an orchard, and rolling green pastures, their Belgian estate is one of the few that escaped dereliction in the difficult preceding years. The garden is Mélanie Duchesne's lifeblood--a boost to her seemingly unending well of vitality. The introspective Paul finds his refuge in writing, his most deeply held ambition. But as the years pass, Paul's books find little audience, and husband and wife focus instead on their furniture business and their growing family. The Bridge of Years follows the Duchesnes in the years leading up to World War II--their daily exploits and travails, the small moments and mundane beauties that fill their lives. When their German friend Schmidt arrives for a visit, he brings news of an impending nightmare in the East that is threatening to overturn life as they know it. With the specter of fascism looming, the rising tensions bring out the best in Paul, whose writing enjoys renewed vigor and intensity, as well as in Mélanie, whose steadfast determination might be the very thing that saves her family as war knocks at their door once again.

Cloud, Stone, Sun, Vine

by May Sarton

A beautifully organized collection of a poet's works in homage to nature One of the primary themes of May Sarton's work, especially in the first few decades of her career as a poet, memoirist, and novelist, is a veneration for and desire to understand nature. This yearning is collected in Cloud, Stone, Sun, Vine, which comprises more than two decades of Sarton's impressive output. The anthology marks a turning point in Sarton's career as her meditations on being alone become more and more frequent, foreshadowing her famous memoir Journal of a Solitude. Featuring the classic sonnet collection "A Divorce of Lovers," Cloud, Stone, Sun, Vine is not to be missed by any Sarton fan.

Collected Poems

by May Sarton

A comprehensive volume collecting May Sarton's poetry from over sixty years of workThis collection spanning six decades exposes the charm and clarity of Sarton's poetry to the fullest. Arranged in chronological order, it follows the transformation of her writing through a wide range of poetic forms and styles. Her poetry meditates on topics including the American landscape, aging, nature, the act of creating art, and self-study. This compendium from one of America's most beloved poets will enthrall readers.

The Collected Poems of Sarton, 1930-1993

by May Sarton

A collection of poetry by May Sarton drawing out her passion for creative vision.

Coming Into 80: Poems

by May Sarton

In this collection, May Sarton takes on the subject of herself in old age. Here are her observations and reflections both on daily events and on the larger questions of life and death, the difficulties and rewards of living alone. Her many fans will find Sarton as celebratory and fresh as ever.

Coming into Eighty

by May Sarton

In May Sarton's seventeenth and final collection of poetry, the writer reflects on life, aging, and mortalityComing into Eighty presents a poet's look at age. Herein, Sarton gives readers a glimpse into her quotidian tasks, her memories, her losses, and her triumphs. The volume explores topics ranging from the war in Iraq to the struggle of taking a cat to the vet. Dark and immediate, this work catalogues both the tedium and the splendor of life with equal wit and beauty. Winner of the Levinson Prize.

Crucial Conversations

by May Sarton

"May Sarton's provocative novel is about a wife who has outgrown her husband, and after twenty-seven years of marriage decides that she has had enough. . . . [Poppy] is altogether believable." --The Atlantic To their close friend Philip, Poppy and Reed Whitelaw's marriage appears stable and happy. Their ritual Sunday tennis matches and dinners are a highlight of his week, and the Whitelaws' repartee is an object of wonder and admiration. But beneath the surface, the marriage has slowly been unraveling for years. An artist, Poppy feels the weight of time, calculating that she has twenty good years left for her work and little remaining tolerance for her diminishing marriage. And so, as newscasts about Vietnam and Watergate issue nightly warnings about the dangers of deceit and delusion, Poppy has decided to leave. The separation guts Philip, who finds that his investment in the affairs of his friends outweighs his investment in his own. The relationship between the three friends had often been riven by jealousy, and the cataclysm of the Whitelaws' separation does little to lessen anxieties roiling beneath the surface. As those in the Whitelaws' orbit struggle to adjust to their new reality, a world of buried feelings rise inevitably to the fore.

A Durable Fire

by May Sarton

Poetic meditations on solitude by acclaimed author May SartonThis collection borrows its title from Sir Walter Raleigh, who wrote, "Love is a durable fire / In the mind ever burning." It is a fitting sentiment for a collection on solitude, wherein the author finds herself full of emotion even in seclusion. The first poem, "Gestalt at Sixty," finds the author reflecting on the joy and loneliness of being solitary. A Durable Fire is a transformative work by a masterful poet.

The Education of Harriet Hatfield

by May Sarton

After her lover of thirty years dies, a Boston woman opens a bookstore for her neighborhood, an endeavor that forces her to confront her past while she rebuilds her future<P> Over the course of their thirty-year relationship, Vicky and Harriet fell into a predictable cadence: Vicky took the lead while Harriet was content to follow. When Vicky dies, Harriet is lost and in search of an identity that was subsumed by that of her partner for three decades. Lying awake in bed one evening, Harriet has an idea--a women's bookstore for the residents of her blue-collar Boston neighborhood, where people can gather, talk, and buy great books. Using her inheritance from Vicky, Harriet begins her next great adventure, opening not only the store but also herself to whatever may come. But while some in the community thrill at the idea of her bookstore, others attack--using graffiti and hate mail to express their prejudice against what they perceive to be an invasion of their neighborhood by "filthy gay men and lesbians." Against this newfound scrutiny and intolerance, Harriet must come to terms not only with the world her privilege had insulated her from, but with what it means to go without fear of labels or discrimination in pursuit of a fuller life.<P> This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.

Encore

by May Sarton

May Sarton discovers the liberation of old age in this life-affirming journal On the second day of her 80th year, May Sarton began a new journal. She wrote it because she wanted "to go on a little while longer;" to discover "what is really happening to me." This triumphant sequel to Endgame--Sarton's journal of her 79th year--is filled with the comforting minutiae of daily life, from gardening to planning dinners and floral arrangements to answering fan mail. The wonderful thing about getting older, Sarton writes, is "the freedom to be absurd, the freedom to forget things . . . the freedom to be eccentric." Her other octogenarian pleasures include preparing for holidays and weddings, lunches with old friends and new admirers, the heady delight of critical recognition, and the rebirth of her lyric voice as she creates new poems. Yet Sarton knows that age can also bring pain and ill health, as well as a deepening awareness of the "perilousness of life on all sides, knowing that at any moment something frightful may happen."

Encounter in April

by May Sarton

The debut work of a literary legend May Sarton's career spanned sixty years and included novels, poetry, memoirs, and even children's books, but it was poetry that provided the world's first look at her wondrous talent. Encounter in April is a fitting starting point for readers wishing to familiarize themselves with one of the twentieth century's most lyrical and eloquent authors. In this anthology, Sarton describes womanhood devastatingly and unforgettably, deftly matching serene imagery with powerful emotion. Her sonnets are to be savored. Encounter in April is a thesis statement for a lengthy and profound career, and Sarton's talent is readily evident from the beginning.

Endgame

by May Sarton

As she battles debilitating illnesses, May Sarton looks back on her life, cherishes new and old friendships, and finds hope in the brave new world of old age "I always imagined a journal that would take me through my seventy-ninth year," May Sarton writes, "the doors opening out from old age to unknown efforts and surprises." Instead of musing calmly on the philosophical implications of aging, the writer found herself spending most of her energy battling for her health. Coping with constant pain and increasing frailty, Sarton fears that the end is not far off. The story of what she calls the "last laps of a long-distance runner," this yearlong journal addresses such familiar Sarton topics as her beloved garden, the harshness of Maine winters, and the friendships and intimate relationships that have nurtured and sustained her. She settles some old literary scores and paints a generous portrait of Virginia Woolf, who often shared tea with Sarton during the late 1930s. When illness saps Sarton's ability to type, she dictates into recorders and has the tapes transcribed by devoted assistants. In spite of the loss of independence and the fear that she will never fully recover, she does her best to soldier on, taking pleasure in small things like a good meal; her cat, Pierrot, who loves the rain; and being able to sleep through the night. An enduring inspiration to millions of women, Sarton even finds the courage to achieve again.

Faithful Are the Wounds

by May Sarton

A professor's suicide is the catalyst for this novel about politics and ideals set at Harvard during the 1950s When Harvard professor Edward Cavan commits suicide by throwing himself under a subway train, his death sets off shock waves both across campus and in the hearts of his loved ones. To Edward's estranged sister, Isabel, her brother represented the dangers she sought to escape through the security of marriage. His student George Hastings saw in Edward the father he wished he had. Damon Phillips shared Edward's idealistic beliefs --until his fear of being branded a Communist caused him to betray his friend. And Ivan Goldberg knew Edward as a man who would rather die than compromise his beliefs. Through the eyes of those he touched, Edward comes alive again, and we begin to understand who he is and what he stands for. With a title that is a metaphor for the embattled lives of 1950s liberals, Faithful Are the Wounds is about what it means to be American and human in a world that can affect us on the most profound spiritual and ideological levels. It is about how much we are willing to sacrifice for our freedom, and what happens when our values are destroyed.

The Fur Person

by May Sarton

This is a delightful story about a cat who follows the ten commandments of being a Gentleman Cat. He adds the eleventh commandment about being a Fur Person. All cat lovers will relate to the cat in this story.

The Fur Person [Illustrated Edition]

by May Sarton

Includes 10 illustrations by Barbara KnoxA delightful, whimsical tale--one of the most popular books for cat lovers ever written.May Sarton's fictionalized account of her cat Tom Jones's life and adventures prior to making the author's acquaintance begins with a fiercely independent, nameless street cat who follows the ten commandments of the Gentleman Cat--including "A Gentleman Cat allows no constraint of his person, not even loving constraint." But after several years of roaming, Tom has grown tired of his vagabond lifestyle, and he concludes that there might be some appeal after all in giving up the freedom of street life for a loving home. It will take just the right human companion, however, to make his transformation from Cat About Town to genuine Fur Person possible. Sarton's book is one of the most beloved stories ever written about the joys and tribulations inherent in sharing one's life with a cat.

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