Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 1 through 8 of 8 results

The Art of Knock

by Philip Graham

In the three-part title story of The Art of the Knock, a travelling salesman knocks with inventive delight on the stubborn, closed doors of his prospective customers-people who find themselves on the wrong side of their own invisible doors. In the face of their mutual solitudes, they devise odd, personal rituals that connect and isolate them at the same time. Two lonely parents, their children grown and far away, begin to adopt and then fight over the light bulbs in their house; a husband returns home to discover that every lie he ever told his wife has been spray-painted on the walls; an elderly man's ghost cannot bear to leave his mourning wife's side. Out of these unspoken patterns, they create a kind of art that reveals both the beauty and danger of the imagination. The Art of the Knock, by turns funny, frightening and sad, combines the fantastic with the ordinary to probe the hidden patterns of our inner worlds.

Braided Worlds

by Philip Graham Alma Gottlieb

In a compelling mix of literary narrative and ethnography, anthropologist Alma Gottlieb and writer Philip Graham continue the long journey of cultural engagement with the Beng people of Côte d'Ivoire that they first recounted in their award-winning memoir Parallel Worlds. Their commitment over the span of several decades has lent them a rare insight. Braiding their own stories with those of the villagers of Asagbé and Kosangbé, Gottlieb and Graham take turns recounting a host of unexpected dramas with these West African villages, prompting serious questions about the fraught nature of cultural contact. Through events such as a religious leader's declaration that the authors' six-year-old son, Nathaniel, is the reincarnation of a revered ancestor, or Graham's late father being accepted into the Beng afterlife, or the increasing, sometimes dangerous madness of a villager, the authors are forced to reconcile their anthropological and literary gaze with the deepest parts of their personal lives. Along with these intimate dramas, they follow the Beng from times of peace through the times of tragedy that led to Côte d'Ivoire's recent civil conflicts. From these and many other interweaving narratives--and with the combined strengths of an anthropologist and a literary writer--Braided Worlds examines the impact of postcolonialism, race, and global inequity at the same time that it chronicles a living, breathing village community where two very different worlds meet.

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Children and Families

by Philip Graham Shirley Reynolds

Entirely revised, rewritten and augmented with 11 completely new chapters, this new edition builds strongly on the aims of the previous edition to provide the latest scientific validation of cognitive behaviour therapy with practical treatment guidance for clinical child psychologists and psychiatrists working with disturbed children. Coverage ranges broadly from school refusal and adjustment to parental divorce through eating and sleeping disorders to substance abuse. It will be invaluable to clinicians wanting to provide ever more effective psychological treatment for children and families. From a review of the first edition: ' . . . clearly written by a number of international authorities in the field. . . . This book will be useful to child psychiatrists and other child mental health professionals, as well as social workers, educationalists and school nurses. It is highly recommended for bench and departmental libraries. ' European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

How to Read an Unwritten Language

by Philip Graham

When Michael Kirby's mother begins to create strangely unsettling personalities before the private audience of her three children, she bestows upon Michael a double-edged gift: the ability to see past the ordinary surface of the world. After her performances lead to catastrophe, Michael embarks on a redemptive journey to uncover the hidden languages of his family, his lovers, even strangers. Through Michael's eyes the reader discovers the unsuspected terrors of a bowling alley, the insinuating force of the daily horoscope, the secret poetry of insurance, and the startling revelations that are possible on a carousel ride. Even simple objects at yard sales and auctions contain stories waiting to be revealed, whether it's a tape recorder holding the contagiously powerful suicide songs of a doomed lover, or the bent plastic arm of a doll that a timid child once waved to ward off imagined dangers. At once exuberantly comic and darkly disturbing, How to Read an Unwritten Language is filled with unforgettable stories, narrated by a man who hopes to save others, and himself, through the telling.

Interior Design

by Philip Graham

Interior Design presents a gallery of people who, for all their strangeness, seem deeply, touchingly familiar as they explore the designs of their private inner thoughts. Huddled under his covers with a flashlight, a young boy lies awake listening to his parents' bitter arguments, and he draws maps of imaginary planets on tennis balls, creating little worlds where his troubled family is somehow happy. A young man becomes obsessed with the idea of his guardian angel, and lives each day believing that it jealously hovers at his side, hungry for his every thought.

The Moon, Come to Earth: Dispatches from Lisbon

by Philip Graham

The author offers an expanded edition of a popular series of dispatches originally published on McSweeneys, an exuberant yet introspective account of a year's sojourn in Lisbon with his wife and daughter.

Parallel Worlds: An Anthropologist and a Writer Encounter Africa

by Philip Graham Alma Gottlieb

This suspenseful and moving memoir of Africa recounts the experiences of Alma Gottlieb, an anthropologist, and Philip Graham, a fiction writer, as they lived in two remote villages in the rain forest of Cote d'Ivoire. With an unusual coupling of first-person narratives, their alternate voices tell a story imbued with sweeping narrative power, humility, and gentle humor. Parallel Worlds is a unique look at Africa, anthropological fieldwork, and the artistic process. "A remarkable look at a remote society [and] an engaging memoir that testifies to a loving partnership . . . compelling. "--James Idema, Chicago Tribune

Showboats: The History of an American Institution

by Philip Graham

This book is a delightful and authoritative record of America''s showboats from the first one, launched in 1831, to the last, ultimately tied up at a St. Louis dock. It is also a record of the men and women who built and loved these floating theaters, of those who performed on their stages, and of the thousands who sat in their auditoriums. And, lastly, it is a record of a genuine folk institution, as American as catfish, which for more than a century did much to relieve the social and cultural starvation of our vast river frontier. For these showboats brought their rich cargoes of entertainment--genuine laughter, a glimpse of other worlds, a respite from the grinding hardship of the present, emotional relaxation--to valley farmers, isolated factory workers and miners, and backwoodsmen who otherwise would have lacked all such opportunities. To the more privileged, the showboats brought pleasant reminder of a half-forgotten culture. They penetrated regions where churches and school had not gone, and where land theaters were for generations to be impossible. Like circuit preachers, they carried their message to the outer fringes of American civilization. In spite of many faults, it was a good message. The frontier had created this institution to fill a genuine need, and it lasted only until other and better means of civilizing these regions could reach them--good roads, automobiles, motion pictures, schools, churches, newspapers, and theaters. But although the showboats have passed into history, they have left a rich legacy. As long as the Mississippi flows into the Gulf, their story will fire the imagination of Americans. Showboating has become so legendary that few Americans know what this unique institution was really like. In Showboats, at long last, the true story emerges. It differs in many important respects from the motion picture and fictional versions to which Americans are accustomed, but it is not a whit the less glamorous. Philip Graham has told his story with imagination, genuine insight, and complete devotion to facts. No one who is interested in America''s past should fail to read it. This book is a delightful and authoritative record of America''s showboats from the first one, launched in 1831, to the last, ultimately tied up at a St. Louis dock. It is also a record of the men and women who built and loved these floating theaters, of those who performed on their stages, and of the thousands who sat in their auditoriums. And, lastly, it is a record of a genuine folk institution, as American as catfish, which for more than a century did much to relieve the social and cultural starvation of our vast river frontier. For these showboats brought their rich cargoes of entertainment - genuine laughter, a glimpse of other worlds, a respite from the grinding hardship of the present, emotional relaxation - to valley farmers, isolated factory workers and miners, and backwoodsmen who otherwise would have lacked all such opportunities. To the more privileged, the showboats brought pleasant reminder of a half-forgotten culture. They penetrated regions where churches and school had not gone, and where land theaters were for generations to be impossible. Like circuit preachers, they carried their message to the outer fringes of American civilization. In spite of many faults, it was a good message. The frontier had created this institution to fill a genuine need, and it lasted only until other and better means of civilizing these regions could reach them - good roads, automobiles, motion pictures, schools, churches, newspapers, and theaters. But although the showboats have passed into history, they have left a rich legacy. As long as the Mississippi flows into the Gulf, their story will fire the imagination of Americans. Showboating has become so legendary that few Americans know what this unique institution was really like. In Showboats, at long last, the true story emerges. It differs in many important respects from the motion picture and fictional versions to which Americans are accustome...

Showing 1 through 8 of 8 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivonas Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.