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Showing 1 through 19 of 19 results

Allison

by Allen Say

When Allison tries on her new red kimono and looks in the mirror, she suddenly realizes that she looks more like her favorite doll, Mei Mei, than her parents. Where did Mei Mei come from? Where do I come from?" Allison asks. "Far, far away -- from another country; Father says."Mother and I went there and brought you and Mei Mei home with us." But Allison is confused. At daycare the next day, she refuses to climb the monkey bars or play tag with the other children, and alone in her room that night she asks Mei Mei, "Allison isn't my real name. Do you know what it is?" But the only answer is the cry of a stray cat looking in her window. Through evocative watercolors and understated prose, Caldecott Medalist Allen Say creates a moving statement on families, adoption, and the search for belonging.

The Bicycle Man

by Allen Say

The amazing tricks two American soldiers do on a borrowed bicycle are a fitting finale for the school sports day festivities in a small village in occupied Japan. Includes picture descriptions.

The Boy in the Garden

by Allen Say

There was a story that Mama read to Jiro: Once, in old Japan, a young woodcutter livedalone in a little cottage. One winter day he found a crane struggling in a snare and set it free. When Jiro looks out the window into Mr. Ozu's garden, he sees a crane and remembers that story. Much like the crane, the legend comes to life-and, suddenly, Jiro finds himself in a world woven between dream and reality. Which is which? Allen Say creates a tale about many things at once: the power of story, the allure of the imagined, and the gossamer line between truth and fantasy. For who among us hasn't imagined ourselves in our own favorite fairy tale?

El Chino

by Allen Say

A biography of Bill Wong, a Chinese American who became a famous bullfighter in Spain.

Emma's Rug

by Allen Say

From the book: When Emma is born, she is given a small rug. Mother lays it by the crib, for the day the baby can stand on her feet. By the time Emma climbs out of the crib, no one can remember who gave her the rug. As soon as she can hold a pencil, Emma begins to draw. Her parents are impressed by her mysterious talent. She wins top prizes in the first grade art contest and a citywide competition. Then one day at school Emma refuses to draw. "Do you feel all right?" the teacher asks. Emma only nods and pushes the box of crayons away. Without her beloved rug, Emma believes that she cannot draw. As the story takes an unusual turn, Emma finds her way back to the easel where she has had so much fun. Other books by allen Say are available from Bookshare.

Erika-San

by Allen Say

Caldecott Medalist Allen Say creates a beautiful story about an American girl who seeks adventure in Japan and discovers more than she could have imagined.In her grandmother's house there is one Japanese print of a small house with lighted windows. Even as a small girl, Erika loved that picture.It will pull her through childhood, across vast oceans and modern cities, then into towns-older, quieter places-she has only ever dreamed about.But Erika cannot truly know what she will find there, among the rocky seacoasts, the rice paddies, the circle of mountains, and the class of children.For Erika-san, can Japan be all that she has imagined?

The Feast of Lanterns

by Allen Say

Two young brothers -- Bozu and Kozo -- living in a fishing village on a small Japanese island visit the mainland for the first time. They "borrow" their uncle's boat and once on the mainland, avoid a speeding train, follow a dancing troupe, befriend a mischieveous monkey, and get caught up in a panic after fireworks sets a village on fire.

Grandfather's Journey

by Allen Say

From the book: Through compelling reminiscences of his grandfather's life in America and Japan, Allen Say delivers a poignant account of his family's unique crosscultural experience. He warmly conveys his own love for his two countries and describes the strong and constant desire to be in both places at once: When in one country, he invariably misses the other. His grandfather, he tells us, would understand.

Home of the Brave

by Allen Say

In dreamlike sequences, a man symbolically confronts the trauma of his family's incarceration in the Japanese internment camps during World War II. This infamous event is made emotionally clear through his meeting a group of children all with strange name tags pinned to their coats. The man feels the helplessness of the children. Finally, desperately he releases the name tags like birds into the air to find their way home with the hope for a time when Americans will be seen as one people-not judged, mistrusted, or segregated because of their individual heritage. Sixty years after thousands of Japanese Americans were unjustly imprisoned, the cogent prose and haunting paintings of renowned author and illustrator Allen Say remind readers of a dark chapter in America's history.

The Ink-Keeper's Apprentice

by Allen Say

A fourteen-year-old boy lives on his own in Tokyo and becomes apprenticed to a famous Japanese cartoonist.

Kamishibai Man

by Allen Say

Using two very different and remarkable styles of art, Caldecott medalist Allen Say tells a tale within a tale, transporting readers seamlessly to the Japan of his childhood, when he used to come running with the children of his own neighborhood at the sound of the kamishibai man's clappers.

The Lost Lake

by Allen Say

Luke and his father, who is disgusted by the tourists surrounding the once secluded lake of his childhood, hike deeper into the wilderness to find a "lost lake" of their own.

Music for Alice

by Allen Say

As a girl, Alice loved to dance, but the rhythms of her life offered little opportunity for a foxtrot, let alone a waltz. World War II erupted soon after she was married. Alice and her husband, along with many other Japanese Americans, were forced to leave their homes and report to assembly centers around the country. Undaunted, Alice and her husband learned to make the most of every circumstance, from their stall in the old stockyard in Portland to the decrepit farm in the Oregon desert, with its field of stones. Like a pair of skilled dancers, they sidestepped adversity to land gracefully amid golden opportunity. Together they turned a barren wasteland into a field of endless flowers. Such achievements did not come without effort and sacrifice, though, and Alice often thought her dancing days were long behind her. But as her story testifies, life is full of changes . . . In this striking book, Allen Say introduces readers to the remarkable story of the life of a woman whose perseverance and resilience serve as an inspirational reminder that dreams can be fulfilled, even when least expected.

A River Dream

by Allen Say

A little boy takes a fantasy trip up the river by his house to fly-fish with his uncle.

The Sign Painter

by Allen Say

In his Caldecott acceptance speech for GRANDFATHER'S JOURNEY, Allen Say told of his difficulty in separating his dreams from reality. For him this separation was not as important as finding a meaning behind the contradictions and choices we all must make in life and their consequences. Early one morning a boy comes into town, hungry, and looking for work. He meets a sign painter who takes him on as a helper. The boy yearns to be a painter. The man offers him security. The two are commissioned to paint a series of billboards in the desert. Each billboard has one word, Arrowstar. They do not know its meaning. As they are about to paint the last sign, the boy looks up and sees in the distance a magnificent structure. Is it real? They go to find out. Through a simple text and extraordinary paintings, the reader learns of the temptation of safe choices and the uncertainties of following a personal dream. Here Allen Say tells a haunting and provocative story of dreams and choices for readers of all ages. [This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 2-3 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

Stranger in the Mirror

by Allen Say

One morning eight-year-old Martin looks in the mirror and sees a stranger. Overnight, he has changed. His parents take him to one doctor after another, only to be told that there is nothing wrong with their son. At school his teacher asks, "What have we here, trick or treat?" His classmates will not play with him. At home his family tries to treat him as if he were the same child. But things now are different. Martin has grown very old in the space of one day. His world will never be the same again.

Tea with Milk

by Allen Say

At home in San Francisco, May speaks Japanese and the family eats rice and miso soup and drinks green tea. When she visits her friends' homes, she eats fried chicken and spaghetti. May plans someday to go to college and live in an apartment of her own. But when her family moves back to Japan, she soon feels lost and homesick for America. In Japan everyone calls her by her Japanese name, Masako. She has to wear kimonos and sit on the floor. Poor May is sure that she will never feel at home in this country. Eventually May is expected to marry and a matchmaker is hired. Outraged at the thought, May sets out to find her own way in the big city of Osaka. Allen Say has created a moving tribute to his parents and their path to discovering where home really is.

Tree of Cranes

by Allen Say

As a young Japanese boy recovers from a bad chill, his mother busily folds origami paper into delicate silver cranes in preparation for the boy's very first Christmas.

Under the Cherry Blossom Tree

by Allen Say

There were eggs in every bird's nest, the air buzzed with honeybees, and cherry trees blossomed all at once. The poor villagers forgot their cares and gathered in the meadow to sing and dance their time away. But their miserly landlord refused to be happy. Mumbling and grumbling, he sat all alone eating a bowl of cherries and glaring at the merry villagers. Then, quite by accident, he swallowed a cherry pit. The pit began to sprout, and soon the landlord was the wonder of the village-a cherry tree was growing out of the top of his head! What happened to the cherry tree and to the wicked landlord is a favorite joke in Japan. Allen Say tells the story with wit and vitality, and his beautiful drawings complement this classic Japanese tale.

Showing 1 through 19 of 19 results

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