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Civil War Poetry and Prose

by Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman experienced the agonies of the Civil War firsthand, working, in his forties, as a dedicated volunteer throughout the conflict in Washington's overcrowded, understaffed military hospitals. This superb selection of his poems, letters, and prose from the war years, filled with the sights and sounds of war and its ugly aftermath, express a vast and powerful range of emotions.Among the poems include here, first published in Drum-Taps (1865) and Sequel to Drum-Taps (1866), are a number of Whitman's most famous works: "O Captain! My Captain!" "The Wound-Dresser," "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd," and "Come Up from the Fields, Father." The letters and prose selections, including Whitman's musings on the publication of his works, on the wounded men he tended, and his impressions of Lincoln traveling about the city of Washington, offer keen insights into an extraordinary era in American history.

Complete Poetry and Collected Prose

by Walt Whitman

This edition is the most comprehensive volume of the work of Walt Whitman and includes all of Whitman's poetry and what he considered his complete prose.

Drum-Taps

by Walt Whitman Lawrence Kramer

Walt Whitman worked as a nurse in an army hospital during the Civil War and published Drum-Taps, his war poems, as the war was coming to an end. Later, the book came out in an expanded form, including "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd," Whitman's passionate elegy for Lincoln. The most moving and enduring poetry to emerge from America's most tragic conflict, Drum-Taps also helped to create a new, modern poetry of war, a poetry not just of patriotic exhortation but of somber witness. Drum-Taps is thus a central work not only of the Civil War but of our war-torn times.But Drum-Taps as readers know it from Leaves of Grass is different from the work of 1865. Whitman cut and reorganized the book, reducing its breadth of feeling and raw immediacy. This edition, the first to present the book in its original form since its initial publication 150 years ago, is a revelation, allowing one of Whitman's greatest achievements to appear again in all its troubling glory.

Franklin Evans, or the Inebriate: A Tale of the Times

by Walt Whitman

Not many people know that Walt Whitman--arguably the preeminent American poet of the nineteenth century--began his literary career as a novelist. Franklin Evans, or The Inebriate: A Tale of the Times was his first and only novel. Published in 1842, during a period of widespread temperance activity, it became Whitman's most popular work during his lifetime, selling some twenty thousand copies. The novel tells the rags-to-riches story of Franklin Evans, an innocent young man from the Long Island countryside who seeks his fortune in New York City. Corrupted by music halls, theaters, and above all taverns, he gradually becomes a drunkard. Until the very end of the tale, Evans's efforts to abstain fail, and each time he resumes drinking, another series of misadventures ensues. Along the way, Evans encounters a world of mores and conventions rapidly changing in response to the vicissitudes of slavery, investment capital, urban mass culture, and fervent reform. Although Evans finally signs a temperance pledge, his sobriety remains haunted by the often contradictory and unsettling changes in antebellum American culture. The editors' substantial introduction situates Franklin Evans in relation to Whitman's life and career, mid-nineteenth-century American print culture, and many of the developments and institutions the novel depicts, including urbanization, immigration, slavery, the temperance movement, and new understandings of class, race, gender, and sexuality. This edition includes a short temperance story Whitman published at about the same time as he did Franklin Evans, the surviving fragment of what appears to be another unfinished temperance novel by Whitman, and a temperance speech Abraham Lincoln gave the same year that Franklin Evans was published.

Leaves of Grass

by Walt Whitman

Leaves of Grass is a timeless collection of poems and essays penned by influential nineteenth-century writer Walt Whitman. This profound compilation explores topics such as nature, mysticism, mortality, transcendentalism, and democracy. Inspired by personal experiences and observations, Whitman spent almost four decades piecing together the complete work, sharing societal ideals and epiphanies about life that still resonate with readers today. Lexile code: NP

Leaves of Grass

by Walt Whitman

As outspoken in his day as Richard Dawkins or Christopher Hitchens are today, American freethinker and author ROBERT GREEN INGERSOLL (1833-1899) was a notorious radical whose uncompromising views on religion and slavery (they were bad, in his opinion), women's suffrage (a good idea, he believed), and other contentious matters of his era made him a wildly popular orator and critic of 19th-century American culture and public life. As a speaker dedicated to expanding intellectual horizons and celebrating the value of skepticism, Ingersoll spoke frequently on such topics as atheism, freedom from the pressures of conformity, and the lives of philosophers who espoused such concepts. This collection of his most famous speeches includes the lectures: [ "The Gods" (1872) [ "Humboldt" (1869) [ "Thomas Paine" (1870) [ "Individuality" (1873) [ "Heretics and Heresies" (1874)

Leaves of Grass

by Walt Whitman

From one of America's best loved and most important poets comes a masterpiece. Leaves of Grass is considered by many to be the greatest collection of poetry ever produced by an American. And this, the 1855 First Edition Text, is considered the strongest and most important of the many editions produced throughout Whitman's life. Here Whitman is at the height of his writing prowess, and no other edition would match it for strength and impact. "The most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

Leaves of Grass

by Walt Whitman

From one of America's best loved and most important poets comes a masterpiece. Leaves of Grass is considered by many to be the greatest collection of poetry ever produced by an American. And this, the 1855 First Edition Text, is considered the strongest and most important of the many editions produced throughout Whitman's life. Here Whitman is at the height of his writing prowess, and no other edition would match it for strength and impact. "The most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

Leaves of Grass

by Walt Whitman Harold Bloom

I celebrate myself, and sing myself, And what I assume you shall assume, For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you. When Walt Whitman self-published his Leaves of Grass in July 1855, he altered the course of literary history. One of the greatest masterpieces of American literature, it redefined the rules of poetry while describing the soul of the American character. Throughout his great career, Whitman continuously revised, expanded, and republished Leaves of Grass, but as Harold Bloom reminds us, the book that matters most is the 1855 original. In celebration of the poem's 150th anniversary, Penguin Classics proudly presents the 1855 text in its original and complete form, with a specially commissioned introductory essay by Harold Bloom.

Leaves of Grass

by Walt Whitman Billy Collins Peter Davison

Ralph Waldo Emerson issued a call for a great poet to capture and immortalize the unique American experience. In 1855, an answer came with Leaves of Grass. Today, this masterful collection remains not only a seminal event in American literature but also the incomparable achievement of one of America's greatest poets--an exuberant, passionate man who loved his country and wrote of it as no other has ever done. Walt Whitman was a singer, thinker, visionary, and citizen extraordinaire. Thoreau called Whitman "probably the greatest democrat that ever lived," and Emerson judged Leaves of Grass as "the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom America has yet contributed." The text presented here is that of the "Deathbed" or ninth edition of Leaves of Grass, published in 1892. The content and grouping of poems is the version authorized by Whitman himself for the final and complete edition of his masterpiece. With a foreword by Billy Collins, an afterword by Peter Davison, and a new introduction by Elisabeth Panttaja Brink

Leaves of Grass (Enriched Classics)

by Walt Whitman Cynthia Brantley Johnson Charles Brower

ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP <P> A collection of quintessentially American poems, the seminal work of one of the most influential writers of the nineteenth century. <P> THIS ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES:<P> * A concise introduction that gives readers important background information<P> * A chronology of the author's life and work<P> * A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context<P> * An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations<P> * Detailed explanatory notes<P> * Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work<P> * Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction<P> * A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience<P> Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world s finest books to their full potential.

Leaves of Grass: The First (1855) Edition

by Walt Whitman

This is the original and complete 1855 edition of one of the greatest masterpieces of American literature, including Whitman's own introduction to the work. .

Leaves of Grass: The Original 1855 Edition

by Walt Whitman

In 1855, Walt Whitman published -- at his own expense -- the first edition of Leaves of Grass, a visionary volume of twelve poems. Showing the influence of a uniquely American form of mysticism known as Transcendentalism, which eschewed the general society and culture of the time, the writing is distinguished by an explosively innovative free verse style and previously unmentionable subject matter. Exalting nature, celebrating the human body, and praising the senses and sexual love, the monumental work was condemned as "immoral." Whitman continued evolving Leaves of Grass despite the controversy, growing his influential work decades after its first appearance by adding new poems with each new printing.This edition presents the original twelve poems from Whitman's premier 1855 publication of Leaves of Grass. Included are some of the greatest poems of modern times: "Song of Myself," "I Sing the Body Electric," and "There Was a Child Went Forth," works that continue to upset conventional notions of beauty and originality even today.

Memoranda During the War: Civil War Journals, 1863-1865

by Walt Whitman Bob Blaisdell

These reflections by one of America's greatest poets on the nation's most momentous struggle began when Walt Whitman discovered his brother's name in a newspaper list of Union Army casualties. The poet hurried from his Brooklyn home to a Virginia battlefront, where he found his brother, wounded but recovering. Profoundly moved by his experiences in the army hospital, Whitman settled in Washington, D.C., for the rest of the war. There he served as a military hospital volunteer, offering medical and spiritual comfort to sick and dying soldiers. His journal entries express in simple, heartfelt terms his Civil War experiences. First published in book form in 1875, Whitman's Memoranda recounts soldiers' anecdotes of recent battles and army life as well as their last words and final messages to faraway friends and family. Whitman recorded his impressions of Abraham Lincoln, whom he frequently encountered on the city streets, and his thoughts on the conflict's day-to-day and historical significance. His evocative, poetic reflections offer a unique portrait of Civil War life.

November Boughs

by Walt Whitman

"I loved this book. It's an inexpensive collection of Walt Whitman poems, letters, and essays that is well worth your time ... this book is worth purchasing and perusing due to its historical value of ruminations on American life." -- Old Musty BooksCompiled when the great poet was 70 years old, November Boughs offers verse and prose reminiscences of a singular American life. Walt Whitman's reflections begin with the essay "A Backward Glance O'er Travel'd Roads," in which he discusses the genesis of his most famous and controversial book, Leaves of Grass. A selection of poetry titled "Sands at Seventy" is followed by a series of essays and recollections that include "Slang in America," "What Lurks Behind Shakespeare's Historical Plays," "The Old Bowery," and notes on the life of the Quaker abolitionist Elias Hicks, whose body -- it was rumored -- he and a youthful group of friends once attempted to exhume.This affordable, high-quality edition of a rare book of poetry and prose provides a greater context for the interpretation of Whitman's other works. Essential reading for Whitman scholars, this volume is also of interest to historians of the Civil War, abolitionism, and nineteenth-century America.

The Portable Walt Whitman

by Walt Whitman Michael Warner

When Walt Whitman self-published Leaves of Grass in 1855 it was a slim volume of twelve poems and he was a journalist and poet from Long Island, little-known but full of ambition and poetic fire. To give a new voice to the new nation shaken by civil war, he spent his entire life revising and adding to the work, but his initial act of bravado in answering Ralph Waldo Emerson's call for a national poet has made Whitman the quintessential American writer. This rich cross-section of his work includes poems from throughout Whitman's lifetime as published on his deathbed edition of 1891, short stories, his prefaces to the many editions of Leaves of Grass, and a variety of prose selections, including Democratic Vistas, Specimen Days, and Slang in America. .

Selected Poems

by Walt Whitman

In his unconventional verse, Walt Whitman spoke in a powerful, sensual, oratorical, and inspiring voice. His most famous work, Leaves of Grass, was a long-term project that the poet compared to the building of a cathedral or the slow growth of a tree. During his lifetime, from 1819 to 1892, it went through nine editions. Today it is regarded as a landmark of American literature.This volume contains 24 poems from Leaves of Grass, offering a generous sampling of Whitman's best and most representative verses. Featured works include "I Hear America Singing," "I Sing the Body Electric," "Song of the Open Road," "Out of Cradle Endlessly Rocking," "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd," and "O Captain! My Captain!"--all reprinted from an authoritative text.

Song of Myself

by Walt Whitman

It was with this first version of "Song of Myself," from the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass, that Whitman first made himself known to the world. Readers familiar with the later, revised editions will find this first version new, surprising, and often superior to the revisions, and exhilarating in the freshness of its vision. A selection of the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

Specimen Days & Collect

by Walt Whitman

Whitman's uniquely revealing impressions of the people, places, and events of his time.One of the most creative and individual poets America has produced, Walt Whitman was also a prolific diarist, note-taker, and essayist whose intimate observations and reflections have profoundly deepened understanding of nineteenth-century American life. Specimen Days and Collect, first published in 1882, is a choice collection of Whitman's uniquely revealing impressions of the people, places, and events of his time, principally the era of the Civil War and its aftermath.On page after page, a vast panorama of American life unfolds, and with it rare glimpse of Whitman as poet, empathetic observer, and romantic wanderer. From his years as a wartime nurse in Washington, D.C., come touching glimpses of the dead and dying in military hospitals, memories of Abraham Lincoln, and vivid impressions of the nation's capital in a time of great crisis.Whitman's travel yields memorable recollections of Boston, the Hudson Valley, a walk through Central Park, Niagara Falls, the City of Denver, and more. Along with the famed essay "Democratic Vistas," there are scenes from the poet's childhood, touching tributes to songbirds, wildflowers, friendship and freedom; impressions of the music of Beethoven, reflections on a last visit to Emerson, the deaths of Lincoln and Longfellow and the painful process of aging.Deeply felt and vividly expressed, Specimen Days and Collect is a richly rewarding experience, a rare excursion into the mind and heard of one of America's greatest poets--and the America his poetry so richly commemorated.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Walt Whitman: The Complete Poems

by Walt Whitman

In 1855 Walt Whitman published Leaves of Grass, the work that defined him as one of America's most influential voices and that he added to throughout his life. A collection of astonishing originality and intensity, it spoke of politics, sexual emancipation, and what it meant to be an American. From the joyful "Song of Myself" and "I Sing the Body Electric" to the elegiac "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd," Whitman's art fuses oratory, journalism, and song in a vivid celebration of humanity. Containing all Whitman's known poetic work, this edition reprints the final, or "deathbed," edition of Leaves of Grass (1891-92). Earlier versions of many poems are also given, including the 1855 "Song of Myself." Features a completely new--and fuller--introduction discussing the development of Whitman's poetic career, his influence on later American poets, and his impact on the American cultural sensibility Includes chronology, updated suggestions for further reading, and extensive notes. Edited, with an introduction and notes by Francis Murphy.

Whitman Illuminated: Song of Myself

by Walt Whitman Allen Crawford

Walt Whitman's iconic collection of poems, Leaves of Grass, has earned a reputation as a sacred American text. Whitman himself made such comparisons, going so far as to use biblical verse as a model for his own. <P><P>So it's only appropriate that artist and illustrator Allen Crawford has chosen to illuminate-like medieval monks with their own holy scriptures-Whitman's masterpiece and the core of his poetic vision, "Song of Myself." Crawford has turned the original sixty-page poem from Whitman's 1855 edition into a sprawling 234-page work of art. The handwritten text and illustrations intermingle in a way that's both surprising and wholly in tune with the spirit of the poem-they're exuberant, rough, and wild. Whitman Illuminated: Song of Myself is a sensational reading experience, an artifact in its own right, and a masterful tribute to the Good Gray Poet.

Whitman Illuminated: Song of Myself

by Walt Whitman Illustrated by Allen Crawford

Containing numerous contemporary images by leading photographers, this indispensable manual concerning wedding portraits explains posing fundamentals as well as how to create a flattering, feature-specific photograph--one that focuses on the head, shoulders, arms, legs, or torso--in different levels of close-ups, from head-shots to full-lengths.

Whitman: Poems

by Walt Whitman

The Everyman's Library Pocket Poets hardcover series is popular for its compact size and reasonable price which does not compromise content. Poems: Whitman contains forty-two of the American master's poems, including "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry," "Song of Myself," "I Hear America Singing," "Halcyon Days," and an index of first lines.

The Wild, Wild West: Thrilling Tales by Famous Authors

by Rudyard Kipling Mark Twain Ralph Waldo Emerson O. Henry Max Brand Charles Dickens Bret Harte Jack London Sir Arthur Conan Doyle James Fenimore Cooper Henry David Thoreau Stephen Crane Robert Louis Stevenson Oscar Wilde Washington Irving Zane Grey Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Ambrose Bierce Walt Whitman John Muir John Richard Stephens

A town that had a man for breakfast every morning.That's how Tombstone, Arizona was described in the late-1800s, bolstering the myth that a corpse would be found cooling in the town's dusty streets each sunrise. The reality was quite different and much less violent, of course, but that hasn't kept the fanciful folklore of the Wild West from being retold in the years since, across America and around the world.This book captures the quick-trigger temper and savage spirit of America's frontier days in The Wild, Wild West, an exciting compilation of factual and fictional stories about the Wild West by famous authors.This is a collection of works on the Wild West by many of the world's most famous authors from the 1800s, including Dickens, Wilde, Emerson, Whitman, Longfellow, Muir, Irving, Thoreau, Twain, Kipling, Bierce, London, James Fenimore Cooper, O. Henry, Bret Harte, Zane Grey, Max Brand, Stephen Crane, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Robert Louis Stevenson. The selections involve gunfights, outlaws, gold mining, the Pony Express, stagecoach robberies, cowboys, card sharks, vigilantes, lynchings, ghost towns, and sheep, along with tributes to Custer and to the Native Americans who did him in.In a Max Brand tale, a town offers to reward a gunslinger for bringing in a stage robber dead or alive, leading to a battle of wits in the outlaw's canyon hideout. A story by Stephen Crane involves four men who play a card game for fun which ends in death, while Jack London tells of a deadly struggle between a hard-working prospector and an opportunistic murderer over a load of gold. Then there's the very first story that introduced the Cisco Kid to the world, along with the jumping frog story that made Mark Twain famous.The vivid personalities and the stories they give rise to in The Wild, Wild West reveal the truth behind the embroidered legends of the Old West, even as they add to them.(300 pages, 62 illustrations)

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