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The Age of Innocence

by Edith Wharton

Wharton scholars spearheaded by Waid (English, U. of California, Santa Barbara) provide a chronology, background, sources, and reviews of her Pulitzer Prize-winning 1920 novel depicting New York society in transition. Illustrations relate to the book's dramatization and sites of interest. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Age of Innocence

by Edith Wharton

As the scion of one of New York's leading families, Newland Archer was born into a life of sumptuous privilege and strict duty. Though sensitive and intelligent, Archer respects the rigid social code of his class and plans to marry "one of his own kind," the striking May Welland. But the arrival of the free-spirited Countess Olenska, who breathes clouds of European sophistication, makes him question his formerly complacent life. As he falls ever more deeply in love with her, he discovers just how hard it is to escape the bounds of his society. Edith Wharton's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel is at once a poignant story of frustrated love and an extraordinarily vivid and satirical portrait of a vanished world. The world's greatest works of literature are now available in these beautiful keepsake volumes. Bound in real cloth, and featuring gilt edges and ribbon markers, these beautifully produced books are a wonderful way to build a handsome library of classic literature. These are the essential novels that belong in every home. They'll transport readers to imaginary worlds and provide excitement, entertainment, and enlightenment for years to come. All of these novels feature attractive illustrations and have an unequalled period feel that will grace the library, the bedside table or bureau.

The Age of Innocence

by Edith Wharton

Wharton scholars spearheaded by Waid (English, U. of California, Santa Barbara) provide a chronology, background, sources, and reviews of her Pulitzer Prize-winning 1920 novel depicting New York society in transition. Illustrations relate to the book's dramatization and sites of interest. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Age of Innocence

by Edith Wharton

One of Edith Wharton's most famous novels--the first by a woman to win the Pulitzer Prize--exquisitely details a tragic struggle between love and responsibility in Gilded Age New York. Newland Archer, an aristocratic young lawyer, is engaged to the cloistered, beautiful May Welland. But when May's cousin Ellen arrives from Europe, fleeing her failed marriage to a Polish count, her worldly and independent nature intrigues and unsettles Archer. Trapped by his passionless relationship with May and the social conventions that forbid a relationship with the disgraced Ellen, Archer is torn between possibility and duty. Wharton's profound understanding of her characters' lives makes the triangle of Archer, May, and Ellen both urgent and poignant. An incisive look at the ways desire and emotion must negotiate the complex rules of society, The Age of Innocence is one of Wharton's most moving works. Phelps and E. M. ForsterFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

A Backward Glance

by Edith Wharton

An autobiography of sorts.

A Backward Glance

by Edith Wharton Louis Auchincloss

A Backward Glance is Edith Wharton's vivid account of both her public and her private life. With richness and delicacy, it describes the sophisticated New York society in which Wharton spent her youth, and chronicles her travels throughout Europe and her literary success as an adult. Beautifully depicted are her friendships with many of the most celebrated artists and writers of her day, including her close friend Henry James. In his introduction to this edition, Louis Auchincloss calls the writing in A Backward Glance "as firm and crisp and lucid as in the best of her novels." It is a memoir that will charm and fascinate all readers of Wharton's fiction.

The Children

by Edith Wharton

In "The Children", an instant bestseller when it was first published in 1928, Edith Wharton created a comic, bittersweet novel about the misadventures of a bachelor and a band of precocious children. The seven Wheater children, stepbrothers and sisters grown weary of being shuttled from parent to parent 'like bundles,' are eager for their parents' latest reconciliation to last. A chance meeting between the children and the solitary forty-six-year old Martin Boyne leads to a series of unforgettable encounters.

The Custom of the Country

by Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton's lacerating satire on marriage and materialism in turn-of-the-century New York features her most selfish, ruthless, and irresistibly outrageous female character. Undine Spragg is an exquisitely beautiful but ferociously acquisitive young woman from the Midwest who comes to New York to seek her fortune. She achieves her social ambitions--but only at the highest cost to her family, her admirers, and her several husbands. Wharton lavished on Undine an imaginative energy that suggests she was as fascinated as she was appalled by the alluring monster she had created. It is the complexity of her attitude that makes The Custom of the Country--with its rich social and emotional detail and its headlong narrative power--one of the most fully realized and resonant of her works.

Ethan Frome

by Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton's most widely read work is a tightly constructed and almost unbearably heartbreaking story of forbidden love in a snowbound New England village. This brilliantly wrought, tragic novella explores the repressed emotions and destructive passions of working-class people far removed from the elevated social milieu usually inhabited by Wharton's characters. Ethan Frome is a poor farmer, trapped in a marriage to a demanding and controlling wife, Zeena. When Zeena's young cousin Mattie enters their household she opens a window of hope in Ethan's bleak life, but his wife's reaction prompts a desperate attempt to escape fate that goes horribly wrong. Ethan Frome is an unforgettable story with the force of myth, featuring realistic and haunting characters as vivid as any Wharton ever conjured.

Ethan Frome and Other Short Fiction

by Edith Wharton

On a bleak New England farm, a taciturn young man has resigned himself to a life of grim endurance. Bound by circumstance to a woman he cannot love, Ethan Frome is haunted by a past of lost possibilities until his wife's orphaned cousin, Mattie Silver, arrives and he is tempted to make one final, desperate effort to escape his fate. In language that is spare, passionate, and enduring, Edith Wharton tells this unforgettable story of two tragic lovers overwhelmed by the unrelenting forces of conscience and necessity. Included with Ethan Frome are the novellaThe Touchstoneand three short stories,"The Last Asset," "The Other Two,"and"Xingu. "Together, this collection offers a survey of the extraordinary range and power of one of America's finest writers.

Ethan Frome & Summer

by Edith Wharton Elizabeth Strout

This edition presents Wharton's two most controversial stories, which she considered inseperable, in one volume for the first time. Set in frigid New England, both deal with sexual awakening and appetite and their devastating consequences. This text includes newly commissioned notes.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Ethan Frome, Summer, Bunner Sisters

by Edith Wharton Hermione Lee

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed) These three brilliantly wrought, tragic novellas explore the repressed emotions and destructive passions of working-class people far removed from the social milieu usually inhabited by Edith Wharton's characters. Ethan Frome is one of Wharton's most famous works; it is a tightly constructed and almost unbearably heartbreaking story of forbidden love in a snowbound New England village. Summer, also set in rural New England, is often considered a companion to Ethan Frome-Wharton herself called it "the hot Ethan"-in its portrayal of a young woman's sexual and social awakening. Bunner Sisters takes place in the narrow, dusty streets of late nineteenth-century New York City, where the constrained but peaceful lives of two spinster shopkeepers are shattered when they meet a man who becomes the unworthy focus of all their pent-up hopes. All three of these novellas feature realistic and haunting characters as vivid as any Wharton ever conjured, and together they provide a superb introduction to the shorter fiction of one of our greatest writers.

Futility

by William Gerhardie Edith Wharton

Hailed by his famous contemporaries including Edith Wharton, H.G. Wells, Katherine Mansfield, Graham Greene, and Evelyn Waugh, who called him a "genius," William Gerhardi is one of the twentieth century's forgotten masters, and his lovely comedy Futility one of the century's neglected masterpieces. It tells the story of someone very similar to Gerhardi himself: a young Englishman raised in Russia who returns to St. Petersburg and falls in love with the daughter of a hilariously dysfunctional family--all played out with the armies of the Russian Revolution marching back and forth outside the parlor window.Part British romantic comedy, part Russian social realism, and with a large cast of memorable characters, this astoundingly funny and poignant novel is the tale of people persisting in love and hope despite the odds.From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Ghost Stories

by Edith Wharton Laszlo Kubinyi

One might not expect a woman of Edith Wharton's literary stature to be a believer of ghost stories, much less be frightened by them, but as she admits in her postscript to this spine-tingling collection, "... till I was twenty-seven or -eight, I could not sleep in the room with a book containing a ghost story." Once her fear was overcome, however, she took to writing tales of the supernatural for publication in the magazines of the day. These eleven finely wrought pieces showcase her mastery of the traditional New England ghost story and her fascination with spirits, hauntings, and other supernatural phenomena. Called "flawlessly eerie" by Ms. magazine, this collection includes "Pomegranate Seed," "The Eyes," "All Souls'," "The Looking Glass," and "The Triumph of Night."

The Glimpses Of The Moon

by Edith Wharton

Set in the 1920s, The Glimpses of the Moon details the romantic misadventures of Nick Lansing and Susy Branch, a couple with the right connections but not much in the way of funds. They devise a shrewd bargain: they'll marry and spend a year or so sponging off their wealthy friends, honeymooning in their mansions and villas. As Susy explains, "We should really, in a way, help more than hamper each other. We both know the ropes so well; what one of us didn't see the other might -- in the way of opportunities, I mean." The other part of the plan states that if either one of them meets someone who can advance them socially, they're each free to dissolve the marriage. How their plan unfolds is a comedy of eros that will charm all fans of Wharton's work.

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