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Afterward: A Ghost Story for Christmas

by Edith Wharton Seth

A newly rich American couple buy an ancient manor house in England, where they hope to live out their days in solitude. One day, when the couple are gazing out at their grounds, they spy a mysterious stranger. When her husband disappears shortly after this eerie encounter, the wife learns the truth about the legend that haunts the ancient estate.

The Age of Innocence

by Edith Wharton

The Age of Innocence won the 1921 Pulitzer Prize. The story is set in upper class New York City in the 1870s. The Age of Innocence centers on an upper class couple's impending marriage, and the introduction of a woman plagued by scandal whose presence threatens their happiness. Though the novel questions the assumptions and morals of 1870's New York society, it never devolves into an outright condemnation. In fact, Wharton considered this novel an apology for her earlier, more brutal and critical novel, The House of Mirth.

The Age of Innocence

by Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) wrote carefully structured fiction that probed the psychological and social elements guiding the behavior of her characters. Her portrayals of upper-class New Yorkers were unrivaled. <P><P> At the heart of the story are three people whose entangled lives are deeply affected by the tyrannical and rigid requirements of high society. Newland Archer, a restrained young attorney, is engaged to the lovely May Welland but falls in love with May's beautiful and unconventional cousin, Countess Ellen Olenska. Despite his fear of a dull marriage to May, Archer goes through with the ceremony -- persuaded by his own sense of honor, family, and societal pressures. He continues to see Ellen after the marriage, but his dreams of living a passionate life ultimately cease.The novel's lucid and penetrating prose style, vivid characterization, and its rendering of the social history of an era have long made it a favorite with readers and critics alike.<P> Pulitzer Prize Winner

The Age of Innocence

by Edith Wharton

Newland Archer saw little to envy in the marriages of his friends, yet he prided himself that in May Welland he had found the companion of his needs--tender and impressionable, with equal purity of mind and manners. Enter Countess Olenska, a woman of quick wit sharpened by experience, not afraid to flout convention and determined to find freedom in divorce. Against his judgment, Newland is drawn to the socially ostracized Ellen Olenska. He knows that in sweet-tempered May, he can expect stability and the steadying comfort of duty. But what new worlds could he discover with Ellen?<P><P> Pulitzer Prize Winner

The Age of Innocence (Enriched Classic)

by Edith Wharton

Wharton scholars spearheaded by Waid (English, U. of California, Santa Barbara) provide a chronology, background, sources, and reviews of her Pulitzer Prize-winning 1920 novel depicting New York society in transition. Illustrations relate to the book's dramatization and sites of interest. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Age of Innocence: The Wild and Wanton Edition Volume 1

by Edith Wharton Coco Rousseau

In Edith Wharton's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Age of Innocence, adapted by Coco Rousseau, the handsome, wealthy Newland Archer, a member of New York's upper class, is caught in a web of a love triangle - not one he falls into, but one he creates. Is it the fair and innocent but superficial May Newland, his betrothed, who can bring Newland the happiness, love, and passion he craves?Or will a desperate Newland Archer disregard the rigid, sterile views of high society and abandon May for another - May's cousin, the beautiful and mysterious Countess Olenska, a married woman who brings scandal wherever she treads?Let intrigue, passion, and lust be your guides as you experience the once hidden, but now openly sensual story of The Age of Innocence.Sensuality Level: Sensual

The Age of Innocence: The Wild and Wanton Edition Volume 2

by Edith Wharton Coco Rousseau

In Edith Wharton's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Age of Innocence, adapted by Coco Rousseau, the handsome, wealthy Newland Archer, a member of New York's upper class, is caught in a web of a love triangle - not one he falls into, but one he creates. Is it the fair and innocent but superficial May Newland, his betrothed, who can bring Newland the happiness, love, and passion he craves?Or will a desperate Newland Archer disregard the rigid, sterile views of high society and abandon May for another - May's cousin, the beautiful and mysterious Countess Olenska, a married woman who brings scandal wherever she treads?Let intrigue, passion, and lust be your guides as you experience the once hidden, but now openly sensual story of The Age of Innocence.Sensuality Level: Sensual

A Backward Glance

by Edith Wharton

An autobiography of sorts.

A Backward Glance

by Edith Wharton Louis Auchincloss

A Backward Glance is Edith Wharton's vivid account of both her public and her private life. With richness and delicacy, it describes the sophisticated New York society in which Wharton spent her youth, and chronicles her travels throughout Europe and her literary success as an adult. Beautifully depicted are her friendships with many of the most celebrated artists and writers of her day, including her close friend Henry James. In his introduction to this edition, Louis Auchincloss calls the writing in A Backward Glance "as firm and crisp and lucid as in the best of her novels." It is a memoir that will charm and fascinate all readers of Wharton's fiction.

The Buccaneers

by Edith Wharton

Set in the 1870s, the same period as Wharton's The Age of Innocence, The Buccaneers is about five wealthy American girls denied entry into New York Society because their parents' money is too new. At the suggestion of their clever governess, the girls sail to London, where they marry lords, earls, and dukes who find their beauty charming-and their wealth extremely useful. After Wharton's death in 1937, The Christian Science Monitor said, "If it could have been completed, The Buccaneers would doubtless stand among the richest and most sophisticated of Wharton's novels. " Now, with wit and imagination, Marion Mainwaring has finished the story, taking her cue from Wharton's own synopsis. It is a novel any Wharton fan will celebrate and any romantic reader will love. This is the richly engaging story of Nan St. George and guy Thwarte, an American heiress and an English aristocrat, whose love breaks the rules of both their societies. .

The Buccaneers

by Edith Wharton Marion Mainwaring

Set in the 1870s, the same period as Wharton's The Age of Innocence, The Buccaneers is about five wealthy American girls denied entry into New York Society because their parents' money is too new. At the suggestion of their clever governess, the girls sail to London, where they marry lords, earls, and dukes who find their beauty charming-and their wealth extremely useful.After Wharton's death in 1937, The Christian Science Monitor said, "If it could have been completed, The Buccaneers would doubtless stand among the richest and most sophisticated of Wharton's novels." Now, with wit and imagination, Marion Mainwaring has finished the story, taking her cue from Wharton's own synopsis. It is a novel any Wharton fan will celebrate and any romantic reader will love. This is the richly engaging story of Nan St. George and guy Thwarte, an American heiress and an English aristocrat, whose love breaks the rules of both their societies.

The Children

by Edith Wharton

In "The Children", an instant bestseller when it was first published in 1928, Edith Wharton created a comic, bittersweet novel about the misadventures of a bachelor and a band of precocious children. The seven Wheater children, stepbrothers and sisters grown weary of being shuttled from parent to parent 'like bundles,' are eager for their parents' latest reconciliation to last. A chance meeting between the children and the solitary forty-six-year old Martin Boyne leads to a series of unforgettable encounters.

The Children

by Edith Wharton

A bestseller when it was first published in 1928, Edith Wharton's The Children is a comic, bittersweet novel about the misadventures of a bachelor and a band of precocious children. The seven Wheater children, stepbrothers and stepsisters grown weary of being shuttled from parent to parent "like bundles," are eager for their parents' latest reconciliation to last. A chance meeting between the children and the solitary forty-six-year-old Martin Boyne leads to a series of unforgettable encounters. Among the colorful cast of characters are the Wheater adults, who play out their own comedy of marital errors; the flamboyant Marchioness of Wrench; and the vivacious fifteen-year-old Judith Wheater, who captures Martin's heart. With deft humor and touching drama, Wharton portrays a world of intrigues and infidelities, skewering the manners and mores of Americans abroad.

The Custom of the Country

by Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton's lacerating satire on marriage and materialism in turn-of-the-century New York features her most selfish, ruthless, and irresistibly outrageous female character. Undine Spragg is an exquisitely beautiful but ferociously acquisitive young woman from the Midwest who comes to New York to seek her fortune. She achieves her social ambitions--but only at the highest cost to her family, her admirers, and her several husbands. Wharton lavished on Undine an imaginative energy that suggests she was as fascinated as she was appalled by the alluring monster she had created. It is the complexity of her attitude that makes The Custom of the Country--with its rich social and emotional detail and its headlong narrative power--one of the most fully realized and resonant of her works.

The Custom of the Country

by Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton's classic story of one woman's quest for wealth and status after the turn of the twentieth century Beautiful, selfish, and driven, Undine Spragg arrives in New York with all of the ambition and naiveté that her midwestern, nouveau riche upbringing afforded her. As cunning as she is lovely, Undine has but one goal in life: to ascend to the upper echelons of high society. And so with a single-minded tenacity, Undine continues to maneuver through life, finding all the while that true satisfaction remains just beyond her grasp. Hailed by Elizabeth Hardwick as "Edith Wharton's finest achievement," The Custom of the Country is a riveting novel of ruthless ambition and a literary master class in the art of the antiheroine. This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

The Custom of the Country

by Edith Wharton Linda Wagner-Martin

Highly acclaimed at its publication in 1913, The Custom of the Country is a cutting commentary on America's nouveaux riches, their upward-yearning aspirations and their eventual downfalls. Through her heroine, the beautiful and ruthless Undine Spragg, a spoiled heiress who looks to her next materialistic triumph as her latest conquest throws himself at her feet, Edith Wharton presents a startling, satiric vision of social behavior in all its greedy glory. As Undine moves from America's heartland to Manhattan, and then to Paris, Wharton's critical eye leaves no social class unscathed.

The Custom of the Country

by Edith Wharton Linda Wagner-Martin

Considered by many to be her masterpiece, Edith Wharton's second full-length work is a scathing yet personal examination of the exploits and follies of the modern upper class. As she unfolds the story of Undine Spragg, from New York to Europe, Wharton affords us a detailed glimpse of what might be called the interior décor of this America and its nouveau riche fringes. Through a heroine who is as vain, spoiled, and selfish as she is irresistibly fascinating, and through a most intricate and satisfying plot that follows Undine's marriages and affairs, she conveys a vision of social behavior that is both supremely informed and supremely disenchanted. This new edition features a new introduction and explanatory notes and reset text

The Decoration of Houses

by Edith Wharton Ogden Codman Jr.

Thousands of books on interior design have come and gone since the 1897 publication of this pioneering manual, but The Decoration of Houses remains, thanks to the insightful and inspiring advice of its co-authors. Before she became the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Age of Innocence, Edith Wharton was a society matron, remodeling a summer home in Newport, Rhode Island. With the able assistance of architect Ogden Codman, Jr., Wharton assembled this corrective to the rampant vulgarity of her nouveau riche neighbors. Wharton and Codman defied the excesses of the Gilded Age, counseling readers to reject the popular penchant for clutter in favor of simplicity and balance.More than an engaging item of period charm, this historic guide offers examples of design rooted in architectural principles. Black-and-white photographs illustrate the authors' ideals of classic beauty, depicting grand ballrooms and spacious boudoirs as well as the elements common to homes of every size and era: doors and windows, walls and ceilings, floors, halls, and stairs. One of the genre's most important and influential titles, this volume sparked a Renaissance in American interior design, and its sound advice and practical approach remain forever in style.

The Descent of Man and Other Stories

by Edith Wharton

The descent of man, and other stories [and] Madame De Treymes (Short story collections) Edith Wharton ( born Edith Newbold Jones; January 24, 1862 - August 11, 1937) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer. She was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1927, 1928 and 1930.Wharton combined her insider's view of America's privileged classes with a brilliant, natural wit to write humorous, incisive novels and short stories of social and psychological insight. She was well acquainted with many of her era's other literary and public figures, including Theodore Roosevelt.Edith Wharton was born Edith Newbold Jones to George Frederic Jones and Lucretia Stevens Rhinelander at their brownstone at 14 West Twenty-third Street in New York City.

Edith Wharton: Collected Stories Vol. 1 1891-1910

by Edith Wharton Maureen Howard

Born into an upper-class New York family, Edith Wharton broke with convention and became a professional writer, earning an enduring place as the grande dame of American letters. <P><P>This Library of America collection (along with its companion volume, Collected Stories: 1911-1937) presents the finest of Wharton's achievement in short fiction, drawn from the more than eighty stories she published over the course of her career. Opening with her first published story--the charming "Mrs. Manstey's View," about a disruption in the life of an elderly apartment-dweller--this first of two volumes presents a writer, already at the height of her powers, beginning to explore the concerns of a lifetime. In "Souls Belated," two lovers attempt to escape the consequences of their adultery--a subject to which Wharton returns throughout her career. In "The Mission of Jane" (about a remarkable adopted child) and "The Pelican" (about an itinerant lecturer), she discovers her gift for social and cultural satire. Perhaps the finest of her ghost stories, "The Eyes," with its Jamesian sense of evil, is also included, along with two novella-length works, "The Touchstone" and "Sanctuary," revealing the dazzling range of Wharton's fictive imagination. Also included in this edition are a chronology of Wharton's life, explanatory notes, and an essay on the texts.From the Hardcover edition.

Edith Wharton The Dover Reader

by Edith Wharton

Born into wealth and aristocracy, Edith Wharton (1862-1937) was a member as well as an observer of fashionable New York society. Aspirations to authorship consigned her to outsider status among the idle rich; nevertheless, she drew upon her privileged social position to create witty and psychologically insightful novels and short stories about people from all walks of life.This well-rounded introduction to Wharton's works features the complete text of her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Age of Innocence, as well as her haunting novella, Ethan Frome. Several excerpts from her highly influential guide to interior design, The Decoration of Houses, offer samples of Wharton's nonfiction style. The collection also includes four short stories as well as several poems.

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