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J2EE Design Patterns

by William Crawford Jonathan Kaplan

Architects of buildings and architects of software have more in common than most people think. Both professions require attention to detail, and both practitioners will see their work collapse around them if they make too many mistakes. It's impossible to imagine a world in which buildings get built without blueprints, but it's still common for software applications to be designed and built without blueprints, or in this case, design patterns. A software design pattern can be identified as "a recurring solution to a recurring problem." Using design patterns for software development makes sense in the same way that architectural design patterns make sense--if it works well in one place, why not use it in another? But developers have had enough of books that simply catalog design patterns without extending into new areas, and books that are so theoretical that you can't actually do anything better after reading them than you could before you started. Crawford and Kaplan's J2EE Design Patterns approaches the subject in a unique, highly practical and pragmatic way. Rather than simply present another catalog of design patterns, the authors broaden the scope by discussing ways to choose design patterns when building an enterprise application from scratch, looking closely at the real world tradeoffs that Java developers must weigh when architecting their applications. Then they go on to show how to apply the patterns when writing realworld software. They also extend design patterns into areas not covered in other books, presenting original patterns for data modeling, transaction / process modeling, and interoperability. J2EE Design Patterns offers extensive coverage of the five problem areas enterprise developers face:Maintenance (Extensibility) Performance (System Scalability) Data Modeling (Business Object Modeling) Transactions (process Modeling) Messaging (Interoperability) And with its careful balance between theory and practice, J2EE Design Patterns will give developers new to the Java enterprise development arena a solid understanding of how to approach a wide variety of architectural and procedural problems, and will give experienced J2EE pros an opportunity to extend and improve on their existing experience.

Java Enterprise in a Nutshell

by Jim Farley David Flanagan William Crawford Kris Magnusson

Java Enterprise in a Nutshell is an indispensable quick reference for Java programmers who are writing distributed enterprise applications. The book provides fast-paced tutorials on the following Java Enterprise APIs: JDBC, a vendor-independent API for accessing relational database systems RMI, a Java-only approach to distributed computing that relies on remote method invocation Java IDL, a CORBA-based, language-independent approach to distributed computing Java servlets, a mechanism for extending a web server that allows Java code to perform tasks traditionally handled by CGI scripts JNDI, a generic Java API for working with networked naming and directory services Enterprise JavaBeans, a component model that separates high-level business logic from low-level housekeeping chores like security and transaction management These APIs are the building blocks of the Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE), Sun's recently announced new platform for enterprise computing. J2EE is the standard Java 2 platform with a number of extensions for enterprise development. Java Enterprise in a Nutshell also contains O'Reilly's classic-style, quick-reference material for all of the classes in the various packages that comprise the Enterprise APIs. This material includes the core Enterprise APIs that are part of Java 1.2, as well as numerous standard extensions. This book is a companion to both Java in a Nutshell, 3rd Edition, which covers the key non-graphical, non-enterprise APIs in Java 1.2, and Java Foundation Classes in a Nutshell, which describes the graphics- and GUI-related classes of Java 1.2.

Java Enterprise in a Nutshell, 2nd Edition

by Jim Farley David Flanagan William Crawford

Nothing is as constant as change, and this is as true in enterprise computing as anywhere else. Since Java Enterprise in a Nutshell was first published in September of 1999, a dozen or more new APIs have been added to the platform, reflecting the new and different ways developers implement their enterprise objectives. And now developers are being called on to add even greater, more complex levels of interconnectivity to their applications, as the concepts behind Web Services solidify and implementation decisions need coding. Java developers today need a clear understanding of the new APIs, tools, capabilities and pitfalls in J2EE 2.0 so they can plan a technology and implementation strategy for new enterprise projects. Fortunately, this is exactly what they get with the new Java Enterprise in a Nutshell, 2nd edition ! Completely revised and updated for the new 2.0 version of Sun Microsystems Java Enterprise Edition software, Java Enterprise in a Nutshell 2nd edition covers all of the J2EE APIs, including RMI, Java IDL, JDBC, JNDI, Java Servlet, and Enterprise JavaBeans, with a fast-paced tutorial and compact reference on each technology. Then Java Enterprise in a Nutshell goes even further, providing a classic O'Reilly-style quick reference for all of the classes in the various packages that comprise the Enterprise APIs - covering the core enterprise APIs as well as numerous standard extensions.

Java Enterprise in a Nutshell, 3rd Edition

by Jim Farley William Crawford

Nothing is as constant as change, and this is as true in enterprise computing as anywhere else. With the recent release of Java 2 Enterprise Edition 1.4, developers are being called on to add even greater, more complex levels of interconnectivity to their applications. To do this, Java developers today need a clear understanding of how to apply the new APIs, use the latest open source Java tools, and learn the capabilities and pitfalls in Java 2 Enterprise Edition 1.4 -- so they can plan a technology and implementation strategy for new enterprise projects. Fortunately, this is exactly what they get with the new Java Enterprise in a Nutshell , 3rd Edition. Because most integrated development environments (IDE) today include API lookup, we took out the main API sections from our previous edition to make room for new chapters, among others, on Ant, Cactus, Hibernate, Jakarta Struts, JUnit, security, XDoclet, and XML/JAXP. Revised and updated for the new 1.4 version of Sun Microsystems Java Enterprise Edition software, Java Enterprise in a Nutshell , 3rd Edition is a practical guide for enterprise Java developers.

Java Servlet Programming

by William Crawford Jason Hunter

Servlets are an exciting and important technology that ties Java to the Web, allowing programmers to write Java programs that create dynamic web content. Java Servlet Programming covers everything Java developers need to know to write effective servlets. It explains the servlet lifecycle, showing how to use servlets to maintain state information effortlessly. It also describes how to serve dynamic web content, including both HTML pages and multimedia data, and explores more advanced topics like integrated session tracking, efficient database connectivity using JDBC, applet-servlet communicaton, interservlet communication, and internationalization. Readers can use the book's numerous real-world examples as the basis for their own servlets. The second edition has been completely updated to cover the new features of Version 2.2 of the Java Servlet API. It introduces chapters on servlet security and advanced communication, and also introduces several popular tools for easier integration of servlet technology with dynamic web pages. These tools include JavaServer Pages (JSP), Tea, XMLC, and the Element Construction Set. In addition to complete coverage of 2.2 specification, Java Servlet programming, 2nd Edition, also contains coverage of the new 2.3 final draft specification.

JavaTM Enterprise in a Nutshell, 2nd Edition

by Jim Farley David Flanagan William Crawford

Completely revised and updated for the new 2.0 version of Sun Microsystems Java Enterprise Edition software, Java Enterprise in a Nutshell covers all of the J2EE APIs, including RMI, Java IDL, JDBC, JNDI, Java Servlet, and Enterprise JavaBeans, with a fast-paced tutorial and compact reference on each technology. Then Java Enterprise in a Nutshell goes even further, providing a classic O'Reilly-style quick reference for all of the classes in the various packages that comprise the Enterprise APIs - covering t

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