Browse Results What Download Format Should I Choose?

Showing 1 through 10 of 10 results

Africa Development Indicators 2011

by the editors at The World Bank

Reliable quantitative data are essential for understanding economic, social and governance development because it provides evidence, and evidence are crucial to set policies, monitor progress and evaluate results. Africa Development Indicators 2010 (ADI) provides the most detailed collection of data on Africa available. It puts together data from different sources, and is an essential tool for policy makers, researchers, and other people interested in Africa.

Agricultural Innovation Systems

by the editors at The World Bank

Research, education, and extension investments, while usually necessary, are often insufficient alone to bring knowledge, technologies, and services that enable farmers and entrepreneurs to innovate. Efforts to strengthen research systems and increase the availability of knowledge have not increased innovation or the use of knowledge in agriculture at the pace or the scale required by the intensifying and proliferating challenges confronting agriculture. Agricultural Innovation Systems: An Investment Sourcebook contributes to the identification, design, and implementation of the investments, approaches, and complementary interventions most likely to strengthen agricultural innovation systems (AIS) and to promote innovation and equitable growth. The Sourcebook provides a menu of tools and operational guidance, as well as good practice lessons, to illustrate approaches to designing, investing in, and improving these systems. Managing the ability of agriculture to meet rising global demand and to respond to the changes and opportunities will require good policy, sustained investments, and innovation--not business as usual. Experience indicates that aside from a strong capacity in R&D, the ability to innovate is often related to collective action and coordination, exchange of knowledge among diverse actors, incentives and resources available to form partnerships and develop business, and an enabling environment. While consensus is developing about what is meant by 'innovation' and 'innovation system,' no detailed blueprint exists for making agricultural innovation happen at a given time, in a given place, for a given result. That said, the AIS approach, which looks at these multiple conditions and relationships that promote innovation in agriculture in specific contexts, has moved from a concept to a subdiscipline with principles of analysis and action. Drawing on approaches that have been tested at different scales in different settings, this Sourcebook emphasizes the lessons learned, benefits and impacts, implementation issues, and prospects for replicating or expanding successful practices. The Sourcebook reflects the experiences and evolving understanding of numerous individuals and organizations concerned with agricultural innovation, including the World Bank. It targets the key operational staff who design and implement lending projects in international and regional development agencies and national governments, as well as the practitioners who design thematic programs and technical assistance packages. The Sourcebook can also be an important resource for the research community and nongovernmental organizations.

Capital for the Future: Saving and Investment in an Interdependent World

by the editors at The World Bank

The gradual acceleration of growth in developing countries is a defining feature of the past two decades. This acceleration came with major shifts in patterns of investment, saving, and capital flows. This second volume in the Global Development Horizons series analyzes these shifts and explores how they may evolve through 2030. Average domestic saving in developing countries stood at 34 percent of their GDP in 2010, up from 24 percent in 1990, while their investment was around 33 percent of their GDP in 2012, up from 26 percent. These trends in saving and investment, along with higher growth rates in developing countries, have resulted in developing countries' share of global savings now standing at 46 percent, nearly double the level of the 1990s. The presence of developing countries on the global stage will continue to expand over the next two decades. Analysis in this report projects that by 2030, China will account for 30 percent of global investment activity, far and away the largest share of any single country, while India and Brazil (at 7 percent and 3 percent) will account for shares comparable to those of the United States and Japan (11 percent and 5 percent). The complex interaction among aging, growth, and financial deepening can be expected to result in a world where developing countries will contribute 62 of every 100 dollars of world saving in 2030, up from 45 dollars in 2010, and where they account for between $6.2 trillion and $13 trillion of global gross capital flows, rising from $1.3 trillion in 2010. Trends in investment, saving, and capital flows through 2030 will affect economic conditions from the household level to the global macroeconomic level, with implications not only for national policy makers but also for international institutions and policy coordination. Policymakers preparing for this change will benefit from a better understanding of the unfolding dynamics of global capital and wealth in the future. This book is accompanied by a website, http://www.worldbank.org/CapitalForTheFuture, that includes a host of related electronic resources: data sets underlying the two main scenarios presented in the report, background papers, technical appendixes, interactive widgets with variations to some of the assumptions used in the projections, and related audio and video resources.

Global Development Finance: External Debt of Developing Countries

by the editors at The World Bank

Global Development Finance 2011: External Debt of Developing Countries is a continuation of the World Bank's publications Global Development Finance, Volume II (1997 through 2009) and the earlier World Debt Tables (1973 through 1996). As in previous years, GDF 2011 provides statistical tables showing the external debt of 128 developing countries that report public and publicly guaranteed external debt to the World Bank's Debtor Reporting System (DRS). It also includes tables of key debt ratios for individual reporting countries and the composition of external debt stocks and flows for individual reporting countries and regional and income groups along with some graphical presentations. GDF 2011 draws on a database maintained by the World Bank External Debt (WBXD) system. Longer time series and more detailed data are available from the Global Development Finance 2011 on CD-ROM and the World Bank open databases, which contain more than 200 time series indicators, covering the years 1970 to 2009 for most reporting countries, and pipeline data for scheduled debt service payments on existing commitments to 2017. The database covers external debt stocks and flows, major economic aggregates, and key debt ratios, as well as average terms of new commitments, currency composition of longterm debt, and debt restructurings in greater detail than can be included in the GDF book. The CD-ROM also contains the full contents of the print version of GDF 2011. Text providing country notes, definitions, and source information is linked to each table. Global Development Finance 2011: External Debt of Developing Countries is unique in its coverage of the important trends and issues fundamental to the financing of the developing world. This report is an indispensible resource for governments, economists, investors, financial consultants, academics, bankers, and the entire development community.

Global Monitoring Report 2013: Rural-Urban Dynamics and the Millennium Development Goals

by the editors at The World Bank

The Global Monitoring Report 2013: Rural-Urban Dynamics and the Millennium Development Goals examines rural-urban disparities in the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and how urbanization, if managed well, can contribute to the attainment of these goals. The report provides information about the differences in progress toward the MDGs across geographical areas and recognizes that urban populations are better off than their rural brethren. However, unfettered urbanization can cause migrants and the urban poor to end up in slums where attainment of the MDGs lags. GMR 2013 calls for an integrated strategy to better manage the planning-connecting-financing formula of urbanization. Notwithstanding the importance of urbanization in poverty reduction and MDG attainment, rural areas remain a huge challenge--one that underscores the importance of policies that can improve rural livelihoods. The rural-urban spectrum ranges from small towns to large cities. The general experience is that poverty is lowest in the largest cities and considerably higher in smaller towns. The MDGs reflect the basic needs of all citizens, and governments should aim to meet them fully in both urban and rural areas. However, resources are scarce, so priorities must be set and trade-offs made. The report argues that the sequencing of actions be tailored to local conditions when it comes to the degree of urbanization and rural-urban differences in MDG outcomes. The world has met four global MDG targets. New estimates confirm the 2012 reports that MDG 1.a--reducing the $1.25-a-day poverty rate (2005 purchasing power parity)--was reached in 2010, falling below half of its 1990 value. The world also met part of MDG 7.c--to halve the proportion of people without safe access to drinking water--in 2010. MDG 7.d--to improve significantly the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers by 2020--was also achieved. Finally, the first part of MDG 3.a--to eliminate gender disparity in primary education-- was accomplished in 2010. Global progress on the full MDG 3.a (to eliminate gender disparity in primary and secondary education) is close to being on track. Global Monitoring Report 2013 was prepared jointly by the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, with consultations and collaborations with regional development banks and other multilateral partners. Show more

Le système éducatif congolais

by the editors at The World Bank

Cette analyse sectorielle est le produit de la collaboration entre une équipe nationale interministérielle (ministères en charge de l'éducation et ministères partenaires) et une équipe d'appui de la Banque mondiale et du Pôle de Dakar en analyse sectorielle (UNESCO-BREDA). Le rapport présente les principales caractéristiques du système éducatif congolais et vise à évaluer les progrès réalisés dans la période récente, à identifier les contraintes qui pèsent sur son développement ainsi que les marges de manuvres qui pourraient aider le pays à durablement améliorer son système éducatif. Ce rapport offre donc aux décideurs nationaux et à leurs partenaires au développement une base analytique solide pour instruire le dialogue politique et le processus de prise de décision. Le Gouvernement Congolais s'est appuyés sur les résultats de ce rapport pour la préparation d'un plan sectoriel d'éducation visant à être endossé par les partenaires techniques et donc à recevoir l'appui financier des partenaires de l'IMOA-EPT.

The Little Data Book on External Debt 2011

by the editors at The World Bank

'The Little Data Book on External Debt' provides a quick reference for users interested in external debt stocks and flows, major economic aggregates, key debt ratios, and the currency composition of long-term debt for all countries reporting through the Debtor Reporting system. A pocket edition of 'Global Development Finance 2011, Summary and Country Tables', it contains statistical tables for 135 countries as well as summary tables for regional and income groups.

The Little Data Book On Gender 2011

by the editors at The World Bank

This handy pocket guide is a quick reference for users interested in the gender statistics. The book presents gender-disaggregated data for more than 200 countries in an easy country-by-country reference on demography, education, health, labor force, political participation and the Millennium Development Goals. The book s summary pages cover regional and income group aggregates.

Measuring the Real Size of the World Economy: The Framework, Methodology, and Results of the International Comparison Program (ICP)

by the editors at The World Bank

Measuring the Real Size of the World Economy: The Framework, Methodology, and Results of the International Comparison Program--ICP is the most comprehensive accounting ever presented by the International Comparison Program (ICP) of the theory and methods underlying the estimation of purchasing power parities (PPPs). PPPs reveal the relative sizes of economies by converting their gross domestic products and related measurements into a common currency, thereby enabling comparisons based on economic and statistical theory. By disclosing the theory, concepts, and methods underlying the estimates, this book increases the transparency of the ICP process. Greater transparency allows researchers, users of PPPs, and those involved in implementation of the program to better understand the strengths, limitations, and assumptions underlying its results. is book also provides a forward-looking view of methodological developments with an eye toward improving the quality of future comparisons. The ICP is now the largest and most complex statistical program in the world. In 2005 it included 100 countries and economies, working in parallel with the 46 countries in the Eurostat-Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) PPP program. Measuring the Real Size of the World Economy was prepared by the ICP Global Office in the World Bank, with contributions from the leading international experts in the fields of economics and statistics on international comparisons.

World Development Report 2012

by the editors at The World Bank

The WDR 2012: Gender Equality and Development will focus on the evolution of gender equality across the world in the context of the development process. The report will consider gender equality as a core development goal in itself, and will argue that gender equality matters for the pace of development. Improvements in gender equality can generate gains in economic efficiency and improvements in other development outcomes. And gender equality has consequences for the quality and representativeness of the institutions a society develops. For key dimensions of gender equality, the report will show that although many women around the world still continue to struggle with gender-based disadvantages, much has changed for the better and at a more rapid pace than ever before. But the report will also show that progress needs to be expanded, protected and deepened. In order to understand why progress has varied across dimensions of gender equality and between countries, the report will look at how markets interact with formal and informal institutions to influence household decision-making by providing incentives, shaping preferences, or imposing constraints. Markets and institutions can combine to provide strong incentives for greater gender equality, but can also fail to do so if they treat males and females differentially. Policymakers and practitioners still face gaps in knowledge both in how gender equality matters for development and how best to incorporate these links in policy design. This WDR aims to bridge these gaps by building upon the growing body of multidisciplinary theory, evidence, and data on these links while highlighting the knowledge gaps that remain.

Showing 1 through 10 of 10 results

Help

Select your download format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. For more details, visit the Formats page under the Getting Started tab.

See and hear words read aloud
  • DAISY Text - See words on the screen and hear words being read aloud with the text-to-speech voice installed on your reading tool. Navigate by page, chapter, section, and more. Can also be used in audio-only mode. Compatible with many reading tools, including Bookshare’s free reading tools.
  • DAISY Text with Images - Similar to DAISY Text with the addition of images within the Text. Your reading tool must support images.
  • Read Now with Bookshare Web Reader - Read and see images directly from your Internet browser without downloading! Text-to-speech voicing and word highlighting are available on Google Chrome (extension installation required). Other browsers can be used with limited features. Learn more
Listen to books with audio only
  • DAISY Audio - Listen to books in audio-only mode with the high-quality Kendra voice by Ivona pre-installed. Navigate by page, chapter, section, and more. Must be used with a DAISY Audio compatible reading tool.
  • MP3 - Listen to books in audio-only mode with the high-quality Kendra voice by Ivona pre-installed. Navigate using tracks. Can be used with any MP3 player.
Read in Braille
  • BRF (Braille Ready Format) - Read with any BRF compatible refreshable braille display; navigate using the search or find feature.
  • DAISY Text - Read with any DAISY 3.0 compatible refreshable braille display, navigate by page, chapter, section, and more.
  • Embossed Braille - Use Bookshare’s DAISY Text or BRF formats to generate embossed braille.