Special Collections

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winners

Description: The Jane Addams Childrens' Book Awards are given annually to those books of exceptional quality which promote the cause of peace, social justice, world community, and the equality of the sexes and all races. #award #kids


Showing 26 through 50 of 107 results
 
 
 

The Breadwinner

by Deborah Ellis

Young Parvana lives with her family in one room of a bombed-out apartment building in Kabul, Afghanistan. Because Parvana's father has a foreign education, he is arrested by the Taliban. The family becomes increasingly desperate until Parvana conceives a plan.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2004

Category: n/a

Award: Special Commendation

Parvana's Journey

by Deborah Ellis

In this sequel to "The Breadwinner, " the Taliban still control Afghanistan, but Kabul is in ruins. Twelve-year-old Parvana's father has just died, and her mother, sister, and brother could be anywhere in the country. Parvana sets out alone to find them, masquerading as a boy, and she meets other children who are victims of war.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2003

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Surrender Tree

by Margarita Engle

It is 1896. Cuba has fought three wars for independence and still is not free. People have been rounded up in reconcentration camps with too little food and too much illness. Rosa is a nurse, but she dares not go to the camps. So she turns hidden caves into hospitals for those who know how to find her.

Black, white, Cuban, Spanish—Rosa does her best for everyone. Yet who can heal a country so torn apart by war? Acclaimed poet Margarita Engle has created another breathtaking portrait of Cuba.

The Surrender Tree is a 2009 Newbery Honor Book, the winner of the 2009 Pura Belpre Medal for Narrative and the 2009 Bank Street - Claudia Lewis Award, and a 2009 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2009

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

People Are Important

by Eva Knox Evans

Explains the origins of communication and languages and how customs and symbols mean different things to different peoples.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1953

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Kids at Work

by Russell Freedman

Lewis Hine's photographs expose the chilling reality of the inhumane working conditions American children endured during the early twentieth century. Hines's photographs of children at work were so devastating that they convinced the American people that Congress must pass child labor laws.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1995

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

We Will Not Be Silent

by Russell Freedman

Backed up by thorough research, Russell Freedman tells the story of Austrian-born Hans Scholl and his sister Sophie. They belonged to Hitler Youth as young children, but began to doubt the Nazi regime. As older students, the Scholls and a few friends formed the White Rose, a campaign of active resistance to Hitler and the Nazis. Risking imprisonment or even execution, the White Rose members distributed leaflets urging Germans to defy the Nazi government. Their belief that freedom was worth dying for will inspire young readers to stand up for what they believe in.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Winner of the Sibert Honor

Date Added: 06/12/2017


Year: 2017

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

Emma's Poem

by Linda Glaser

Give me your tired, your poor

Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free...

Who wrote these words? And why?

In 1883, Emma Lazarus, deeply moved by an influx of immigrants from Eastern Europe, wrote a sonnet that was to give voice to the Statue of Liberty. Originally a gift from France to celebrate our shared national struggles for liberty, the Statue, thanks to Emma's poem, slowly came to shape our hearts, defining us as a nation that welcomes and gives refuge to those who come to our shores.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2011

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Natural History

by M. B. Goffstein

Text and illustrations descibe the riches of the earth and how people can promote peace and goodwill by sharing equitably with each other and their fellow creatures.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1980

Category: n/a

Award: Special Commendation

Waiting For The Rain

by Sheila Gordon

This novel shows the bonds of friendship under the strain of apartheid as two lifelong friends, Tengo and Frikkie, come of age amidst the tragedy of South Africa.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1988

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Paul Robeson (Crowell Biographies)

by Eloise Greenfield

A biography of the black man who became a famous singer, actor, and spokesman for equal rights for his people.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1976

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Anthony Burns

by Virginia Hamilton

The true story of a young man struggling for freedom at the dawn of the Civil War Anthony Burns is a runaway slave who has just started to build a life for himself in Boston. Then his former owner comes to town to collect him. Anthony won't go willingly, though, and people across the city step forward to make sure he's not taken.

Based on the true story of a man who stood up against the Fugitive Slave Law, Hamilton's gripping account follows the battle in the streets and in the courts to keep Burns a citizen of Boston--a battle that is the prelude to the nation's bloody Civil War.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1989

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Delivering Justice

by Jim Haskins

A respected biographer teams up with an acclaimed artist to tell the story of the mail carrier who orchestrated the Great Savannah Boycott -- and was instrumental in bringing equality to his community. "Grow up and be somebody," Westley Wallace Law's grandmother encouraged him as a young boy living in poverty in segregated Savannah, Georgia. Determined to make a difference in his community, W.W. Law assisted blacks in registering to vote, joined the NAACP and trained protesters in the use of nonviolent civil disobedience, and, in 1961, led the Great Savannah Boycott. In that famous protest, blacks refused to shop in downtown Savannah. When city leaders finally agreed to declare all of its citizens equal, Savannah became the first city in the south to end racial discrimination. A lifelong mail carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, W.W. Law saw fostering communication between blacks and whites as a fundamental part of his job. As this affecting biography makes clear, this "unsung hero" delivered far more than the mail to the citizens of the city he loved.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2006

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Little Fishes

by Erik Christian Haugaard

The story of a twelve-year-old Italian boy who, while suffering under German occupation, struggles to protect his spirit and humanity which was his late mother’s only wish.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1968

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Endless Steppe

by Esther Hautzig

A young Polish girl, her father, her mother, and her grandmother are taken prisoner by the Russians during World War II, evicted from their home, and shipped in a filthy cattle car to a forced-labor camp in a remote, impoverished Siberian village. For four terrible years, the family struggles for beds, food, clothing, fuel--all the everyday things that one takes for granted. Despite bitter hardships, the family makes a new life with new friends. And they never lose their deep affection and trust in one another. Esther Rudomin Hautzig's account of her childhood in Siberia is a magnificent story of the triumph of the human spirit.

A Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winner.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1969

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Many Smokes, Many Moons

by Jamake Highwater

With emphasis on the tribes in North America, this book uses the art and artifacts of various Indian cultures to illustrate events affecting their history from earliest times through 1973.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1979

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Night Diary

by Veera Hiranandani

A 2019 NEWBERY HONOR BOOK"A gripping, nuanced story of the human cost of conflict appropriate for both children and adults."                                                                                                                 -Kirkus, starred reviewIn the vein of Inside Out and Back Again and The War That Saved My Life comes a poignant, personal, and hopeful tale of India's partition, and of one girl's journey to find a new home in a divided countryIt's 1947, and India, newly independent of British rule, has been separated into two countries: Pakistan and India. The divide has created much tension between Hindus and Muslims, and hundreds of thousands are killed crossing borders.Half-Muslim, half-Hindu twelve-year-old Nisha doesn't know where she belongs, or what her country is anymore. When Papa decides it's too dangerous to stay in what is now Pakistan, Nisha and her family become refugees and embark first by train but later on foot to reach her new home. The journey is long, difficult, and dangerous, and after losing her mother as a baby, Nisha can't imagine losing her homeland, too. But even if her country has been ripped apart, Nisha still believes in the possibility of putting herself back together.Told through Nisha's letters to her mother, The Night Diary is a heartfelt story of one girl's search for home, for her own identity...and for a hopeful future.

Date Added: 03/24/2021


Year: 2019

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

The Riddle of Racism

by S. Carl Hirsch

For thousands of years men have known that the inhabitants of different parts of the world are often visibly different. But in America, for the first time anywhere on earth, three great racial groups met in large numbers on the same continent. White colonizers took the land from the native population they called Indians, whose physical traits linked them to Asian origins. Black people were brought here from Africa to serve the white settlers as slaves. "Under this set of conditions," observes S. Carl Hirsch, "the meeting of the three great races on America's soil was not likely to he a happy one." In this bold, challenging book, the author examines the historical record for the roots of the race hatred that has troubled our nation since its inception. Within a chronological framework, the book traces the search for scientific knowledge of race as a biological phenomenon against the background of political events that reveal its sociological aspects. The scientific struggle was focussed on the question of "superior" and "inferior races, from a time when white supremacy was the prevailing view of America's political, social, and religious leaders, including those opposed to slavery, to today's understanding of a concept of race its biological and cultural significance. Along the way the reader meets many individuals whose personal stories illuminate the perpetual questions underlying that irrational force which still continues to pervade our land: racism.

A Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winner.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1973

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Enemy

by Sara Holbrook

Set in 1954, this compelling historical novel tells the story of a young girl’s struggles and triumphs in the aftermath of World War II. The war is over, but the threat of communism and the Cold War loom over the United States.

In Detroit, Michigan, twelve-year-old Marjorie Campbell struggles with the ups and downs of family life, dealing with her veteran father’s unpredictable outbursts, keeping her mother’s stash of banned library books a secret, and getting along with her new older “brother,” the teenager her family took in after his veteran father’s death.

When a new girl from Germany transfers to Marjorie’s class, Marjorie finds herself torn between befriending Inga and pleasing her best friend, Bernadette, by writing in a slam book that spreads rumors about Inga. Marjorie seems to be confronting enemies everywhere—at school, at the library, in her neighborhood, and even in the news.

In all this turmoil, Marjorie tries to find her own voice and figure out what is right and who the real enemies actually are. Includes an author’s note and bibliography.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2018

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Tamarack Tree

by Betty Underwood and Bea Holmes

In 1833 Bernadette come to Canterbury dreaming of a better education. She found herself in the middle of an uproar over girls of color being admitted to a female seminary in a time when education for white women was hard to come by.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1972

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

We Rise, We Resist, We Raise Our Voices

by Wade Hudson and Cheryl Willis Hudson

Fifty of the foremost diverse children's authors and illustrators--including Jason Reynolds, Jacqueline Woodson, and Kwame Alexander--share answers to the question, "In this divisive world, what shall we tell our children?" in this beautiful, full-color keepsake collection, published in partnership with Just Us Books.What do we tell our children when the world seems bleak, and prejudice and racism run rampant? With 96 lavishly designed pages of original art and prose, fifty diverse creators lend voice to young activists.Featuring poems, letters, personal essays, art, and other works from such industry leaders as Jacqueline Woodson (Brown Girl Dreaming), Jason Reynolds (All American Boys), Kwame Alexander (The Crossover), Andrea Pippins (I Love My Hair), Sharon Draper (Out of My Mind), Rita Williams-Garcia (One Crazy Summer), Ellen Oh (cofounder of We Need Diverse Books), and artists Ekua Holmes, Rafael Lopez, James Ransome, Javaka Steptoe, and more, this anthology empowers the nation's youth to listen, learn, and build a better tomorrow.

Date Added: 03/24/2021


Year: 2019

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

Midnight Without a Moon

by Linda Williams Jackson

It’s Mississippi in the summer of 1955, and Rose Lee Carter can’t wait to move north. But for now, she’s living with her sharecropper grandparents on a white man’s cotton plantation.

Then, one town over, an African American boy, Emmett Till, is killed for allegedly whistling at a white woman. When Till’s murderers are unjustly acquitted, Rose realizes that the South needs a change . . . and that she should be part of the movement.

Linda Jackson’s moving debut seamlessly blends a fictional portrait of an African American family and factual events from a famous trial that provoked change in race relations in the United States.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Honors Book

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2018

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

Children as Teachers of Peace

by Gerald G. Jampolsky

This book by our children is the result of a joyous journey. From the day we were inspired by the realization of the truth in the words "Children as Teachers of Peace"... to the invitation we issued that same week to children throughout the country to express their thoughts and advice about peace... to the day only five weeks later when this book was delivered to the publisher, we have been profoundly moved by the truth our children speak for all of us.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1983

Category: n/a

Award: Special Commendation

The Monkey and the Wild, Wild Wind

by Ryerson Johnson and Lois Lignell

This is the story of a monkey whose antics resulted in cooperation and friendship among the animals stranded in a cave.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1963

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Weedflower

by Cynthia Kadohata

Twelve-year-old Sumiko feels her life has been made up of two parts: before Pearl Harbor and after it. The good part and the bad part. Raised on a flower farm in California, Sumiko is used to being the only Japanese girl in her class. Even when the other kids tease her, she always has had her flowers and family to go home to.

That all changes after the horrific events of Pearl Harbor. Other Americans start to suspect that all Japanese people are spies for the emperor, even if, like Sumiko, they were born in the United States! As suspicions grow, Sumiko and her family find themselves being shipped to an internment camp in one of the hottest deserts in the United States. The vivid color of her previous life is gone forever, and now dust storms regularly choke the sky and seep into every crack of the military barrack that is her new "home."

Sumiko soon discovers that the camp is on an Indian reservation and that the Japanese are as unwanted there as they'd been at home. But then she meets a young Mohave boy who might just become her first real friend...if he can ever stop being angry about the fact that the internment camp is on his tribe's land.

With searing insight and clarity, Newbery Medal-winning author Cynthia Kadohata explores an important and painful topic through the eyes of a young girl who yearns to belong. Weedflower is the story of the rewards and challenges of a friendship across the racial divide, as well as the based-on-real-life story of how the meeting of Japanese Americans and Native Americans changed the future of both.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2007

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Girl From the Tar Paper School

by Teri Kanefield

Before the Little Rock Nine, before Rosa Parks, before Martin Luther King Jr. and his March on Washington, there was Barbara Rose Johns, a teenager who used nonviolent civil disobedience to draw attention to her cause. In 1951, witnessing the unfair conditions in her racially segregated high school, Barbara Johns led a walkout--the first public protest of its kind demanding racial equality in the U.S.--jumpstarting the American civil rights movement. Ridiculed by the white superintendent and school board, local newspapers, and others, and even after a cross was burned on the school grounds, Barbara and her classmates held firm and did not give up. Her school's case went all the way to the Supreme Court and helped end segregation as part of Brown v. Board of Education.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2015

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner


Showing 26 through 50 of 107 results