Special Collections

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winners

Description: The Jane Addams Childrens' Book Awards are given annually to those books of exceptional quality which promote the cause of peace, social justice, world community, and the equality of the sexes and all races. #award #kids


Showing 51 through 75 of 107 results
 
 
 

Profiles in Courage Young Readers Memorial Edition

by John F. Kennedy

Courage is the virtue that President Kennedy most admired. He sought out those people who had demonstrated in some way, whether it was on a battlefield or a baseball diamond, in a speech or fighting for a cause, that they had courage, that they would stand up, that they could be counted on.

That is why this book so fitted his personality, his beliefs. It is a study of men who, at risk to themselves, their futures, even the well-being of their children, stood fast for principle. It was toward that ideal that he modeled his life. And this in time gave heart to others.

As Andrew Jackson said, "One man with courage makes a majority." That is the effect President Kennedy had on others.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1964

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Malala's Magic Pencil

by Malala Yousafzai and Kerascoet

Nobel Peace Prize winner and New York Times bestselling author Malala Yousafzai's first picture book, inspired by her own childhood.

Malala's first picture book will inspire young readers everywhere to find the magic all around them.

As a child in Pakistan, Malala made a wish for a magic pencil. She would use it to make everyone happy, to erase the smell of garbage from her city, to sleep an extra hour in the morning.

But as she grew older, Malala saw that there were more important things to wish for. She saw a world that needed fixing. And even if she never found a magic pencil, Malala realized that she could still work hard every day to make her wishes come true.

This beautifully illustrated volume tells Malala's story for a younger audience and shows them the worldview that allowed Malala to hold on to hope even in the most difficult of times.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2018

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Stick-in-the-mud

by Jean Ketchum

Tomba was a small boy who lived in a village where all the houses were made of mud. When the rains came every year, all the people sat around in the wet. Tomba had an idea that if the huts were put on sticks, they wouldn't have to be uncomfortable. But the villagers had always lived that way and didn't want to listen to a small boy. But many times a new approach to a problem will solve, and Tomba did.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1954

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Road from Home

by David Kherdian

An extraordinary biography, this is also a record and reminder of yet another infamous holocaust in our century. Veron Dumehjian was born to a prosperous Armenian family, who lived in the Armenian quarter of the city of Aziziya, Turkey. Her early childhood was idyllic, until 1915, when the Turkish government, after years of persecuting its Christian minorities, decided to rid Turkey of its Armenian population. Veron was deported with her family and survived incredible hardship and suffering until, at the age of 16, she left for America as a "mail-order" bride. Poet-anthologist David Kherdian's story of his mother is a unique and gripping story of courage, survival and hope.

Newbery Medal Honor book

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1980

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Harvesting Hope

by Kathleen Krull

Cesar Chavez is known as one of America's greatest civil rights leaders. When he led a 340-mile peaceful protest march through California, he ignited a cause and improved the lives of thousands of migrant farmworkers. But Cesar wasn't always a leader. As a boy, he was shy and teased at school. His family slaved in the fields for barely enough money to survive. Cesar knew things had to change, and he thought that--maybe--he could help change them. So he took charge. He spoke up. And an entire country listened. An author's note provides historical context for the story of Cesar Chavez's life.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2004

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

Wilma Unlimited

by Kathleen Krull

Before Wilma was five years old, polio had paralyzed her left leg. Everyone said she would never walk again. But Wilma refused to believe it. Not only would she walk again, she vowed, she'd run. And she did run--all the way to the Olympics, where she became the first American woman to earn three gold medals in a single olympiad.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1997

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

Selavi, That Is Life

by Youme Landowne

"Not so long ago and not so far away, people with guns could take a family, burn a house and disappear, leaving a small child alone in the world. " So begins the true story of Selavi, a small boy who finds himself on the streets of Haiti.

Selavi finds other street children who share their food and a place to sleep with him. Together they proclaim a message of hope through murals and radio programs. Youme is an artist and activist who has worked with communities in Kenya, Japan, Haiti and Cuba to make art which honors personal and cultural wisdom.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2005

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

A Place Where Sunflowers Grow

by Amy Lee-Tai

While she and her family are interned at Topaz Relocation Center during World War II, Mari gradually adjusts as she enrolls in an art class, makes a friend, plants sunflowers and waits for them to grow.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2007

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Freedom's Children

by Ellen S. Levine

In this inspiring collection of true stories, thirty African-Americans who were children or teenagers in the 1950s and 1960s talk about what it was like for them to fight segregation in the South-to sit in an all-white restaurant and demand to be served, to refuse to give up a seat at the front of the bus, to be among the first to integrate the public schools, and to face violence, arrest, and even death for the cause of freedom."Thrilling...Nothing short of wonderful."-The New York TimesAwards:( A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year( A Booklist Editors' Choice

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1994

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

We've Got A Job

by Cynthia Y. Levinson

We've Got a Job tells the little-known story of the 4,000 black elementary-, middle-, and high school students who voluntarily went to jail in Birmingham, Alabama, between May 2 and May 11, 1963. Fulfilling Mahatma Gandhi s and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. s precept to fill the jails, they succeeded where adults had failed in desegregating one of the most racially violent cities in America. Focusing on four of the original participants who have participated in extensive interviews, We've Got a Job recounts the astonishing events before, during, and after the Children's March.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2013

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Each Kindness

by Jacqueline Woodson and E. B. Lewis

Each kindness makes the world a little better. Chloe and her friends won't play with the new girl, Maya.

Maya is different--she wears hand-me-downs and plays with old-fashioned toys.

Every time Maya tries to join Chloe and her gang, they reject her.

Eventually, Maya plays alone, and then stops coming to school altogether.

When Chloe's teacher gives a lesson about how even small acts of kindness can change the world, Chloe is stung by the lost opportunity for friendship, and thinks about how much better it could have been if she'd shown a little kindness toward Maya.

This unforgettable book is written and illustrated by the award-winning team that created The Other Side and the Caldecott Honor winner Coming On Home Soon.

With its powerful message and striking art, it will resonate with readers long after they've put it down.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2013

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

We Are Water Protectors

by Carole Lindstrom

Inspired by the many Indigenous-led movements across North America, We Are Water Protectors issues an urgent rallying cry to safeguard the Earth’s water from harm and corruption―a bold and lyrical picture book written by Carole Lindstrom and vibrantly illustrated by Michaela Goade. Water is the first medicine. It affects and connects us all . . . When a black snake threatens to destroy the Earth And poison her people’s water, one young water protector Takes a stand to defend Earth’s most sacred resource.

Date Added: 05/11/2021


Year: 2021

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

This Land Is My Land

by George Littlechild

Artist George Littlechild shows and tells us what it means to be a young Native artist living on the cusp of the 21st century. Giving thanks to the ancestors who have guided him, he documents the struggles of Native peoples and offers us stories of delight, humor and healing.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1994

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

The Day You Begin

by Jacqueline Woodson and Rafael López

National Book Award winner Jacqueline Woodson and two-time Pura Belpré Illustrator Award winner Rafael López have teamed up to create a poignant, yet heartening book about finding courage to connect, even when you feel scared and alone. There will be times when you walk into a room and no one there is quite like you. There are many reasons to feel different. Maybe it's how you look or talk, or where you're from; maybe it's what you eat, or something just as random. It's not easy to take those first steps into a place where nobody really knows you yet, but somehow you do it. Jacqueline Woodson's lyrical text and Rafael López's dazzling art reminds us that we all feel like outsiders sometimes-and how brave it is that we go forth anyway. And that sometimes, when we reach out and begin to share our stories, others will be happy to meet us halfway.

Date Added: 05/20/2021


Year: 2019

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

A Spirit to Ride the Whirlwind

by Athena V. Lord

Twelve-year-old Binnie, whose mother runs a company boarding house in Lowell, Massachusetts, begins working in a textile mill and is caught up in the 1836 strike of women workers.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1982

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Julián Is a Mermaid

by Jessica Love

In an exuberant picture book, a glimpse of costumed mermaids leaves one boy flooded with wonder and ready to dazzle the world.

While riding the subway home from the pool with his abuela one day, Julián notices three women spectacularly dressed up. Their hair billows in brilliant hues, their dresses end in fishtails, and their joy fills the train car. When Julián gets home, daydreaming of the magic he’s seen, all he can think about is dressing up just like the ladies in his own fabulous mermaid costume: a periwinkle curtain for his tail, the fronds of a potted fern for his headdress. But what will Abuela think about the mess he makes — and even more importantly, what will she think about how Julián sees himself? Mesmerizing and full of heart, Jessica Love’s author-illustrator debut is a jubilant picture of self-love and a radiant celebration of individuality.

Date Added: 03/24/2021


Year: 2019

Category: Younger Children

Award: Honors Book

Brave Girl

by Michelle Markel

From acclaimed author Michelle Markel and Caldecott Honor artist Melissa Sweet comes this true story of Clara Lemlich, a young Ukrainian immigrant who led the largest strike of women workers in U. S. history.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2014

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Hiroshima No Pika

by Toshi Maruki

August 6, 1945, 8:15 a.m.

Hiroshima. Japan

A little girl and her parents are eating breakfast, and then it happened.

HIROSHIMA NO PIKA. This book is dedicated to the fervent hope the Flash will never happen again, anywhere.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1983

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Escape of Oney Judge

by Emily Arnold Mccully

When General George Washington is elected the first President of the United States, his wife chooses young Oney Judge, a house slave who works as a seamstress at Mount Vernon, to travel with her to the nation's capital in New York City as her personal maid. When the capital is moved to Philadelphia, the Washingtons and Oney move, too, and there Oney meets free blacks for the first time. At first Oney can't imagine being free - she depends on the Washingtons for food, warmth, and clothing. But then Mrs. Washington tells Oney that after her death she will be sent to live with Mrs. Washington's granddaughter. Oney is horrified because she knows it is likely that she will then be sold to a stranger - the worst fate she can imagine. Oney realizes she must run.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2008

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Molly Bannaky

by Alice Mcgill and Chris K. Soentpiet

On a cold gray morning in 1683, Molly Walsh sat on a stool tugging at the udder of an obstinate cow. When she spilled the milk, she was brought before the court for stealing. Because she could read, Molly escaped the typical punishment of death on the gallows. At the age of seventeen, the English dairymaid was exiled from her country and sentenced to work as an indentured servant in British Colonial America. Molly worked for a planter in Maryland for seven long years. Then she was given an ox hitched to a cart, some supplies-and her freedom. That a lone woman should stake land was unheard of. That she would marry an African slave was even more so. Yet Molly prospered, and with her husband Bannaky, she turned a one-room cabin in the wilderness into a thriving one hundred-acre farm. And one day she had the pleasure of writing her new grandson's name in her cherished Bible: Benjamin Banneker.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2000

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

A Long Hard Journey

by Patricia C. Mckissack and Fredrick L. Mckissack

"An exciting labor history . . . an excellent introduction to the subject". --School Library Journal.

Coretta Scott King Award winner.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1990

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Jane Addams Pioneer of Social Justice

by Cornelia Meigs

Jane Addams, the first women to receive the Nobel Peace prize, was a vivid example of the influence that can be achieved through courage, perseverance, personal integrity and respect for others regardless of social status. Not only is this book an interesting historical narrative, but it carefully reminds the reader of unsuitable urban living and working conditions of the past as it traces the development of social attitudes now taken for granted.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1971

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Ain't Gonna Study War No More

by Milton Meltzer

A history of those who have protested war with emphasis on the United States.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1986

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Never to Forget

by Milton Meltzer

Six million Jews were killed in Europe between the years 1933 and 1945. What can that number mean to us today? We can that number mean to us today? We are told never to forget the Holocaust, but how can we remember something so incomprehensible?

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1977

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

New Shoes

by Eric Velasquez and Susan Lynn Meyer

When her brother's hand-me-down shoes don't fit, it is time for Ella Mae to get new ones. She is ecstatic, but when she and her mother arrive at Mr. Johnson's shoe store, her happiness quickly turns to dejection.

Ella Mae is forced to wait when a customer arrives after her and is served first. Ella Mae is unable even to try on the shoes because of her skin color. Determined to fight back, Ella Mae and her friend Charlotte work tirelessly to collect and restore old shoes, wiping, washing, and polishing them to perfection.

The girls then have their very own shoe sale, giving the other African American members of their community a place to buy shoes where they can betreated fairly and "try on all the shoes they want. "

Set in the South during the time of segregation, this stunning picture book brings the civil rights era to life for contemporary readers.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2016

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner


Showing 51 through 75 of 107 results