Special Collections

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winners

Description: The Jane Addams Childrens' Book Awards are given annually to those books of exceptional quality which promote the cause of peace, social justice, world community, and the equality of the sexes and all races.


Showing 1 through 25 of 93 results
 
 
 

We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement That Defied Adolf Hitler

by Russell Freedman

The dramatic, disturbing story of the small group of university students who dared to distribute leaflets condemning Hitler and his policies. Several paid with their lives.

Date Added: 06/12/2017


Year: 2017

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

Wolf Hollow

by Lauren Wolk

A young girl's kindness, compassion, and honesty overcome bullying.

Date Added: 06/12/2017


Year: 2017

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom: My Story of the Selma Voting Rights March

by Elspeth Leacock and Susan Buckley and Lynda Blackmon Lowery and Pj Loughran

A memoir of the Civil Rights Movement from one of its youngest heroes As the youngest marcher in the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Albama, Lynda Blackmon Lowery proved that young adults can be heroes.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2016

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Separate Is Never Equal : Sylvia Mendez and Her Family's Fight for Desegregation

by Duncan Tonatiuh

Sylvia Mendez was denied enrollment to a "Whites only" school. Her parents took action by organizing the Hispanic community and filing a lawsuit in federal district court. Their success eventually brought an end to the era of segregated education in California.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2015

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Girl From the Tar Paper School : Barbara Rose Johns and the advent of the Civil Rights Movement

by Teri Kanefield

The story of Barbara Rose Johns, a teenager who used non-violent civil disobedience and led a walkout against the unfair conditions in her racially segregated high school, jump-starting the American civil rights movement.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2015

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Brave Girl: Clara and the Shirtwaist Makers' Strike of 1909

by Michelle Markel

From acclaimed author Michelle Markel and Caldecott Honor artist Melissa Sweet comes this true story of Clara Lemlich, a young Ukrainian immigrant who led the largest strike of women workers in U. S. history.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2014

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Sugar

by Jewell Parker Rhodes

Ten-year-old Sugar lives on the River Road sugar plantation along the banks of the Mississippi. Slavery is over, but laboring in the fields all day doesn't make her feel very free.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2014

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Each Kindness

by Jacqueline Woodson and E. B. Lewis

When Ms. Albeit teaches a lesson on kindness, Chloe realizes that she and her friends have been wrong in making fun of new student Maya's shabby clothes and refusing to play with her.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2013

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

We've Got A Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children's March

by Cynthia Y. Levinson

Discusses the events of the 4,000 African American students who marched to jail to secure their freedom in May 1963.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2013

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Mangrove Tree: Planting Trees to Feed Families

by Susan L. Roth and Cindy Trumbore

For a long time, the people of Hargigo, a village in the tiny African country of Eritrea, were living without enough food for themselves and their animals. Then along came a scientist, Dr. Gordon Sato, who helped to change their lives for the better.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2012

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Sylvia and Aki

by Winifred Conkling

At the start of World War II, Japanese American third-grader Aki and her family are sent to an internment camp in Poston, Arizona, while Mexican American third-grader Sylvia's family leases their Orange County, California, farm and begins a fight to stop school segregation.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2012

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Emma's Poem: The Voice of the Statue of Liberty

by Linda Glaser

Give me your tired, your poor Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free... Who wrote these words? And why?

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2011

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

A Long Walk to Water: Based on a True Story

by Linda Sue Park

A Long Walk to Water begins as two stories, told in alternating sections, about a girl in Sudan in 2008 and a boy in Sudan in 1985.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2011

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Nasreen's Secret School: A True Story from Afghanistan

by Jeanette Winter

Based on a true story. After her parents are taken away by the Taliban, young Nasreen stops speaking. But as she spends time in a secret school, she slowly breaks out of her shell.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2010

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Marching For Freedom

by Elizabeth Partridge

An inspiring look at the fight for the vote, by an award-winning author Only 44 years ago in the U.S., Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was leading a fight to win blacks the right to vote. Ground zero for the movement became Selma, Alabama.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2010

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Planting the Trees of Kenya: The Story of Wangari Maathai

by Claire A. Nivola

Wangari Maathai, winner of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize and founder of the Green Belt Movement, grew up in the highlands of Kenya, where fig trees cloaked the hills, fish filled the streams, and the people tended their bountiful gardens.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2009

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba's Struggle for Freedom

by Margarita Engle

It is 1896. Cuba has fought three wars for independence and still is not free. People have been rounded up in reconcentration camps with too little food and too much illness. Rosa is a nurse, but she dares not go to the camps. So she turns hidden caves into hospitals for those who know how to find her.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2009

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Escape of Oney Judge: Martha Washington's Slave Finds Freedom

by Emily Arnold Mccully

Oney, Martha Washington's slave, does not know where she will end up. She only knows that she wants to be free, with no mistress but herself.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2008

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

We Are One: the Story of Bayard Rustin

by Larry Dane Brimner

Bayard Rustin was a man with purpose- and a man with heart. As a nonviolent activist, Bayard made his mark working alongside many African American leaders, notably A. Philip Randolph and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2008

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

A Place Where Sunflowers Grow

by Amy Lee-Tai

While she and her family are interned at Topaz Relocation Center during World War II, Mari gradually adjusts as she enrolls in an art class, makes a friend, plants sunflowers and waits for them to grow.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2007

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Weedflower

by Cynthia Kadohata

Twelve-year-old Sumiko feels her life has been made up of two parts: before Pearl Harbor and after it. The good part and the bad part. Raised on a flower farm in California, Sumiko is used to being the only Japanese girl in her class.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2007

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Delivering Justice: W. W. Law and the Fight for Civil Rights

by Jim Haskins

A respected biographer teams up with an acclaimed artist to tell the story of the mail carrier who orchestrated the Great Savannah Boycott -- and was instrumental in bringing equality to his community.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2006

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Let Me Play: The Story of Title IX, the Law That Changed the Future of Girls in America

by Karen Blumenthal

In 1972, Congress passed a modest little law called Title IX, that said any school receiving money from the government couldn't treat boys and girls differently because of their sex.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2006

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Selavi, That Is Life: A Haitian Story Of Hope

by Youme Landowne

"Not so long ago and not so far away, people with guns could take a family, burn a house and disappear, leaving a small child alone in the world. " So begins the true story of Selavi, a small boy who finds himself on the streets of Haiti.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2005

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

With Courage and Cloth: Winning the Fight for a Woman's Right to Vote

by Ann Bausum

For grades 5 and up. The story of how women fought for and won the right to vote in the United States. Over the course of seven compelling, fact-filled chapters-"Parade," "Rights," "Momentum," "Protest," "Prison," "Action," and "Victory"-the story of a brave struggle unfolds, showing how women used the democratic system that excluded them in order to become full voting citizens of their nation.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2005

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner


Showing 1 through 25 of 93 results