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Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winners

Description: The Jane Addams Childrens' Book Awards are given annually to those books of exceptional quality which promote the cause of peace, social justice, world community, and the equality of the sexes and all races. #award #kids


Showing 51 through 75 of 98 results
 
 
 

Jane Addams Pioneer of Social Justice

by Cornelia Meigs

Jane Addams, the first women to receive the Nobel Peace prize, was a vivid example of the influence that can be achieved through courage, perseverance, personal integrity and respect for others regardless of social status. Not only is this book an interesting historical narrative, but it carefully reminds the reader of unsuitable urban living and working conditions of the past as it traces the development of social attitudes now taken for granted.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1971

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Well

by Mildred D. Taylor

Another powerful story in the Logan Family Saga and companion to Mildred D. Taylor's Newbery Award-winning Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry.

For David Logan, a time of distress means taking the higher road. During a drought, the Logan family shares their well water with their neighbors, black and white alike. But David's brother Hammer finds it hard to share with Charlie Simms, who torments them because they are black. Hammer's pride and Charlie's meanness are a dangerous combination, and tensions between the boys build and build--until they explode.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1996

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Never to Forget

by Milton Meltzer

Six million Jews were killed in Europe between the years 1933 and 1945. What can that number mean to us today? We can that number mean to us today? We are told never to forget the Holocaust, but how can we remember something so incomprehensible?

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1977

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Through My Eyes

by Margo Lundell and Ruby Bridges

On November 14, 1960, a tiny six-year-old black child, surrounded by federal marshals, walked through a mob of screaming segregationists and into her school. From where she sat in the office, Ruby Bridges could see parents marching through the halls and taking their children out of classrooms. The next day, Ruby walked through the angry mob once again and into a school where she saw no other students. The white children did not go to school that day, and they wouldn't go to school for many days to come. Surrounded by racial turmoil, Ruby, the only student in a classroom with one wonderful teacher, learned to read and add. This is the story of a pivotal event in history as Ruby Bridges saw it unfold around her. Ruby's poignant words, quotations from writers and from other adults who observed her, and dramatic photographs recreate an amazing story of innocence, courage, and forgiveness. Ruby Bridges' story is an inspiration to us all.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2000

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Child of the Owl

by Laurence Yep

A young girl is sent to live with her grandmother in Chinatown and finds her Chinese heritage for the first time.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1978

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

A Spirit to Ride the Whirlwind

by Athena V. Lord

Twelve-year-old Binnie, whose mother runs a company boarding house in Lowell, Massachusetts, begins working in a textile mill and is caught up in the 1836 strike of women workers.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1982

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Molly Bannaky

by Alice Mcgill and Chris K. Soentpiet

On a cold gray morning in 1683, Molly Walsh sat on a stool tugging at the udder of an obstinate cow. When she spilled the milk, she was brought before the court for stealing. Because she could read, Molly escaped the typical punishment of death on the gallows. At the age of seventeen, the English dairymaid was exiled from her country and sentenced to work as an indentured servant in British Colonial America. Molly worked for a planter in Maryland for seven long years. Then she was given an ox hitched to a cart, some supplies-and her freedom. That a lone woman should stake land was unheard of. That she would marry an African slave was even more so. Yet Molly prospered, and with her husband Bannaky, she turned a one-room cabin in the wilderness into a thriving one hundred-acre farm. And one day she had the pleasure of writing her new grandson's name in her cherished Bible: Benjamin Banneker.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2000

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

Marching For Freedom

by Elizabeth Partridge

An inspiring look at the fight for the vote, by an award-winning author Only 44 years ago in the U.S., Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was leading a fight to win blacks the right to vote. Ground zero for the movement became Selma, Alabama. Award-winning author Elizabeth Partridge leads you straight into the chaotic, passionate, and deadly three months of protests that culminated in the landmark march from Selma to Montgomery in 1965. Focusing on the courageous children who faced terrifying violence in order to march alongside King, this is an inspiring look at their fight for the vote. Stunningly emotional black-and-white photos accompany the text.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2010

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

With Courage and Cloth

by Ann Bausum

For grades 5 and up. With Courage and Cloth tells the story of how women fought for and won the right to vote in the United States. Over the course of seven compelling, fact-filled chapters-"Parade," "Rights," "Momentum," "Protest," "Prison," "Action," and "Victory"-the story of a brave struggle unfolds, showing how women used the democratic system that excluded them in order to become full voting citizens of their nation. The book starts with basic history on the struggle for women's rights, other groups' battles for the vote, and background on the 19th-century women's suffrage movement before focusing on the ultimately successful 20th century efforts to enfranchise women. It details and illustrates the political lobbying and public protests organized by women's groups led by suffragists like Alice Paul and the backlash against these efforts, including intimidation, imprisonment, hunger strikes, and forced feeding of prisoners. The book explains how support for women's suffrage grew, leading to the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1919, and the battle to get it ratified by three-fourths of the nation's 48 states. An afterword includes a discussion of the evolution of voting rights and women's rights since 1920, including the efforts to pass an equal rights amendment. This political struggle for equal rights under the law makes for an exciting story that demonstrates democracy in action and how people have worked to improve the system.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2005

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

A Long Hard Journey

by Patricia C. Mckissack and Fredrick L. Mckissack

"An exciting labor history . . . an excellent introduction to the subject". --School Library Journal.

Coretta Scott King Award winner.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1990

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Monkey and the Wild, Wild Wind

by Ryerson Johnson and Lois Lignell

This is the story of a monkey whose antics resulted in cooperation and friendship among the animals stranded in a cave.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1963

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Riddle of Racism

by S. Carl Hirsch

For thousands of years men have known that the inhabitants of different parts of the world are often visibly different. But in America, for the first time anywhere on earth, three great racial groups met in large numbers on the same continent. White colonizers took the land from the native population they called Indians, whose physical traits linked them to Asian origins. Black people were brought here from Africa to serve the white settlers as slaves. "Under this set of conditions," observes S. Carl Hirsch, "the meeting of the three great races on America's soil was not likely to he a happy one." In this bold, challenging book, the author examines the historical record for the roots of the race hatred that has troubled our nation since its inception. Within a chronological framework, the book traces the search for scientific knowledge of race as a biological phenomenon against the background of political events that reveal its sociological aspects. The scientific struggle was focussed on the question of "superior" and "inferior races, from a time when white supremacy was the prevailing view of America's political, social, and religious leaders, including those opposed to slavery, to today's understanding of a concept of race its biological and cultural significance. Along the way the reader meets many individuals whose personal stories illuminate the perpetual questions underlying that irrational force which still continues to pervade our land: racism.

A Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winner.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1973

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Separate Is Never Equal

by Duncan Tonatiuh

Almost 10 years before Brown vs. Board of Education, Sylvia Mendez and her parents helped end school segregation in California.

An American citizen of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage who spoke and wrote perfect English, Mendez was denied enrollment to a "Whites only" school.

Her parents took action by organizing the Hispanic community and filing a lawsuit in federal district court.

Their success eventually brought an end to the era of segregated education in California.

2015 Jane Addams Younger Reader Award,

2015 Pura Belpré Illustrator Honor Book

2015 Robert F. Sibert Honor Book

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2015

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

A Place Where Sunflowers Grow

by Amy Lee-Tai

While she and her family are interned at Topaz Relocation Center during World War II, Mari gradually adjusts as she enrolls in an art class, makes a friend, plants sunflowers and waits for them to grow.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2007

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Seven Brave Women

by Betsy Hearne and Bethanne Andersen

Take a journey through time as a young girl recounts the exploits of her female ancestors, seven brave women who left their imprints on the past and on her. Beginning with the great-great-great-grandmother who came to America on a wooden sailboat, these women were devout and determined and tireless and beloved.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1998

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

Esperanza Rising

by Pam Muñoz Ryan

Esperanza thought she'd always live with her family on their ranch in Mexico--she'd always have fancy dresses, a beautiful home, and servants. But a sudden tragedy forces Esperanza and Mama to flee to California during the Great Depression, and to settle in a camp for Mexican farm workers. Esperanza isn't ready for the hard labor, financial struggles, or lack of acceptance she now faces. When their new life is threatened, Esperanza must find a way to rise above her difficult circumstances--Mama's life, and her own, depend on it.

Winner of the Pura Belpre Medal

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2001

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Rainbow Round the World

by Elizabeth Yates

The author describes her travels with a young boy as they visit 10 countries where UNICEF funds were being used.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1955

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Looking Out

by Victoria Boutis

Though pleased to be part of the "in" crowd at her new school, Ellen's growing awareness of her parents' social concerns, expressed in their support of the condemned Rosenbergs, forces her to make a choice about what really matters in life.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1989

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

This Land Is My Land

by George Littlechild

Artist George Littlechild shows and tells us what it means to be a young Native artist living on the cusp of the 21st century. Giving thanks to the ancestors who have guided him, he documents the struggles of Native peoples and offers us stories of delight, humor and healing.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1994

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

The Little Fishes

by Erik Christian Haugaard

The story of a twelve-year-old Italian boy who, while suffering under German occupation, struggles to protect his spirit and humanity which was his late mother’s only wish.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1968

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Taste of Salt

by Frances Temple

In the hospital after being beaten by Macoutes, seventeen-year-old Djo tells the story of his impoverished life to a young woman who, like him, has been working with the social reformer Father Aristide to fight the repression in Haiti.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1993

Category: Book for Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Meeting with a Stranger

by Duane Bradley

Cantuffa is a thick thorn bush which once covered much of the land of Ethiopia, preventing any progress until it had been cut away. For this reason an emperor about to make a voyage across the country proclaimed, "Cut down the cantuffa in the four quarters of the world, for I know not where I am going."

This story helps to shack away at some of the thorns which still obscure this nation. It describes the young boy Teffera, left in charge of his family's farm and sheep while his father was undergoing an operation. When a ferangi, an American, came to his small village to help teach new methods of caring for the sheep, Teffera had to decide whether he should accept this advice. His people had had substantial reason to mistrust the Westerners, and he was instilled with pride in own traditions, but on the other hand his flocks were dying.

This book has the dual value of illuminating the character of the Ethiopian peasant and of providing an insight into the problems they must face in adapting to progress while maintaining their national spirit.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1965

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Nasreen's Secret School

by Jeanette Winter

Based on a true story. After her parents are taken away by the Taliban, young Nasreen stops speaking. But as she spends time in a secret school, she slowly breaks out of her shell.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2010

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Many Smokes, Many Moons

by Jamake Highwater

With emphasis on the tribes in North America, this book uses the art and artifacts of various Indian cultures to illustrate events affecting their history from earliest times through 1973.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1979

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Road to Agra

by Armiee Sommerfelt

The Road to Agra is a children's novel, written by Aimée Sommerfelt and published in Norwegian in 1959 as Veien til Agra. It is her most famous work and has been translated into 17 other languages. It is a tender story of the love between thirteen-year-old Lalu and his younger sister, Maya, who is seven. Lalu protects his sister and takes care of her needs. His concern for Maya's failing eyesight, the result of a contagious disease called trachoma, prompts Lalu to take his sister on a perilous, three-hundred-mile journey on foot to seek medical help. Lalu's desire to better his situation in life and his unwavering commitment to his goal will inspire young readers.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1962

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner


Showing 51 through 75 of 98 results