Special Collections

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winners

Description: The Jane Addams Childrens' Book Awards are given annually to those books of exceptional quality which promote the cause of peace, social justice, world community, and the equality of the sexes and all races. #award #kids


Showing 1 through 25 of 107 results
 
 
 

All The Colors Of The Race

by Arnold Adoff and John L. Steptoe

A collection of poems written from the point of view of a child with a black mother and a white father.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1983

Category: n/a

Award: Special Commendation

The Short Life Of Sophie Scholl

by Hermann Vinke and Ilse Aichinger

The biography of the twenty-one year-old German student who was put to death for her anti-Nazi activities with the underground group called the White Rose.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1985

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Big Book for Peace

by Lloyd Alexander and Marilyn Sachs and Lois Lowry and Yoshiko Uchida and Katherine Paterson and Jean Fritz and Natalie Babbitt and Nancy Willard and Myra Cohn Livingston and Charlotte Zolotow and John Bierhorst and Thacher Hurd and Steven Kellogg and Milton Meltzer and Mildred Pitts Walter and Jean Craighead George

The wisdom of peace and the absurdity of fighting are demonstrated in seventeen stories and poems by outstanding authors of today such as Jean Fritz, Milton Meltzer, and Nancy Willard.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1991

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Marianthe's Story, Painted Words

by Aliki

Two separate stories in one book, the first telling of Mari's starting school in a new land, and the second describing village life in her country before she and her family left in search of a better life.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1999

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

Seven Brave Women

by Betsy Hearne and Bethanne Andersen

Take a journey through time as a young girl recounts the exploits of her female ancestors, seven brave women who left their imprints on the past and on her. Beginning with the great-great-great-grandmother who came to America on a wooden sailboat, these women were devout and determined and tireless and beloved.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1998

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

What Then Raman

by Shirley L. Arora

A boy in India is the first in his village to learn to read and longs to buy a special book. He comes from a poor country family which has barely enough money to buy food. To earn more money, Raman works gathering plants for an American woman, and learns that with education comes responsibility as well as privilege.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1961

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Growing Up in Coal Country

by Susan Campbell Bartoletti

Through interviews, newspaper accounts, and other original sources, Bartoletti pieced together a picture of life in the Pennsylvania coal mines at the turn of the century.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1997

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Rain Of Fire

by Marion Dane Bauer

When Steve's older brother Matthew, returning home after service in World War II, refuses to talk about his wartime experiences, Steve's friends begin to doubt the stories he has told of Matthew's heroism.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1984

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

With Courage and Cloth

by Ann Bausum

For grades 5 and up. With Courage and Cloth tells the story of how women fought for and won the right to vote in the United States. Over the course of seven compelling, fact-filled chapters-"Parade," "Rights," "Momentum," "Protest," "Prison," "Action," and "Victory"-the story of a brave struggle unfolds, showing how women used the democratic system that excluded them in order to become full voting citizens of their nation. The book starts with basic history on the struggle for women's rights, other groups' battles for the vote, and background on the 19th-century women's suffrage movement before focusing on the ultimately successful 20th century efforts to enfranchise women. It details and illustrates the political lobbying and public protests organized by women's groups led by suffragists like Alice Paul and the backlash against these efforts, including intimidation, imprisonment, hunger strikes, and forced feeding of prisoners. The book explains how support for women's suffrage grew, leading to the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1919, and the battle to get it ratified by three-fourths of the nation's 48 states. An afterword includes a discussion of the evolution of voting rights and women's rights since 1920, including the efforts to pass an equal rights amendment. This political struggle for equal rights under the law makes for an exciting story that demonstrates democracy in action and how people have worked to improve the system.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2005

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Blue Mystery

by Margot Benary-Isbert

The principal event is the disappearance of a blue gloxinia, [Blue Mystery] a special flower of Dr. Benninger's, and the clearance of Fridolin from suspicion.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1957

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Let Me Play

by Karen Blumenthal

In 1972, Congress passed a modest little law called Title IX, that said any school receiving money from the government couldn't treat boys and girls differently because of their sex. For the first time, girls across the United States got a real chance to play on the athletic field — and that little law took on a role far greater than anyone ever imagined it could.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2006

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Story Of The Negro

by Arna Bontemps and Raymond Lufkin

A history of the Negro race, from the early tribes of Africa and empire of Ethiopia, through the practice of slavery in many areas, especially the United States, to early twentieth century achievements of American Negroes.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1956

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Looking Out

by Victoria Boutis

Though pleased to be part of the "in" crowd at her new school, Ellen's growing awareness of her parents' social concerns, expressed in their support of the condemned Rosenbergs, forces her to make a choice about what really matters in life.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1989

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Meeting with a Stranger

by Duane Bradley

Cantuffa is a thick thorn bush which once covered much of the land of Ethiopia, preventing any progress until it had been cut away. For this reason an emperor about to make a voyage across the country proclaimed, "Cut down the cantuffa in the four quarters of the world, for I know not where I am going."

This story helps to shack away at some of the thorns which still obscure this nation. It describes the young boy Teffera, left in charge of his family's farm and sheep while his father was undergoing an operation. When a ferangi, an American, came to his small village to help teach new methods of caring for the sheep, Teffera had to decide whether he should accept this advice. His people had had substantial reason to mistrust the Westerners, and he was instilled with pride in own traditions, but on the other hand his flocks were dying.

This book has the dual value of illuminating the character of the Ethiopian peasant and of providing an insight into the problems they must face in adapting to progress while maintaining their national spirit.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1965

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Through My Eyes

by Margo Lundell and Ruby Bridges

On November 14, 1960, a tiny six-year-old black child, surrounded by federal marshals, walked through a mob of screaming segregationists and into her school. From where she sat in the office, Ruby Bridges could see parents marching through the halls and taking their children out of classrooms. The next day, Ruby walked through the angry mob once again and into a school where she saw no other students. The white children did not go to school that day, and they wouldn't go to school for many days to come. Surrounded by racial turmoil, Ruby, the only student in a classroom with one wonderful teacher, learned to read and add. This is the story of a pivotal event in history as Ruby Bridges saw it unfold around her. Ruby's poignant words, quotations from writers and from other adults who observed her, and dramatic photographs recreate an amazing story of innocence, courage, and forgiveness. Ruby Bridges' story is an inspiration to us all.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2000

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

We Are One

by Larry Dane Brimner

Bayard Rustin's life was dedicated to helping others-fighting injustices and discriminations-so that people could live as one. Protesting segregation long before there was a civil rights movement, he was often arrested for his beliefs and actions. As an organizer, Bayard was largely responsible for bringing people together to walk for freedom and jobs in Washington, D. C., on that memorable summer day, August 28, 1963.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2008

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom

by Elspeth Leacock and Susan Buckley and Lynda Blackmon Lowery and Pj Loughran

A memoir of the Civil Rights Movement from one of its youngest heroes

As the youngest marcher in the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Albama, Lynda Blackmon Lowery proved that young adults can be heroes. Jailed eleven times before her fifteenth birthday, Lowery fought alongside Martin Luther King, Jr. for the rights of African-Americans. In this memoir, she shows today's young readers what it means to fight nonviolently (even when the police are using violence, as in the Bloody Sunday protest) and how it felt to be part of changing American history.

Straightforward and inspiring, this beautifully illustrated memoir brings readers into the middle of the Civil Rights Movement, complementing Common Core classroom learning and bringing history alive for young readers.

Winner of the Sibert Honor

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2016

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Queenie Peavy

by Robert Burch

Queenie Peavy is the worst troublemaker at school and the best shot in Georgia — with her father in jail, why shouldn't she be angry? But Queenie wonders what would happen if she tried to behave herself, just for one day...

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1967

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Journey of the Sparrows

by Fran Leeper Buss

Maria and her brother and sister, Salvadoran refugees, are smuggled into the United States in crates and try to eke out a living in Chicago with the help of a sympathetic family.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1992

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Finish the Fight!

by Veronica Chambers and The Staff of The New York Times

Who was at the forefront of women's right to vote? We know a few famous names, like Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, but what about so many others from diverse backgrounds—black, Asian, Latinx, Native American, and more—who helped lead the fight for suffrage? On the hundredth anniversary of the historic win for women's rights, it's time to celebrate the names and stories of the women whose stories have yet to be told. Gorgeous portraits accompany biographies of such fierce but forgotten women as Yankton Dakota Sioux writer and advocate Zitkála-Šá, Mary Eliza Church Terrell, who cofounded the National Association of Colored Women (NACW), and Mabel Ping-Hua Lee, who, at just sixteen years old, helped lead the biggest parade in history to promote the cause of suffrage. FINISH THE FIGHT will fit alongside important collections that tell the full story of America's fiercest women. Perfect for fans of GOOD NIGHT STORIES FOR REBEL GIRLS and BAD GIRLS THROUGHOUT HISTORY.

Date Added: 03/24/2021


Year: 2020

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

The Princess And The Admiral

by Charlotte Pomerantz and Tony Chen

A small patch of dry Asian land called the Tiny Kingdom serves as the home for a community of poor farmers and fisherfolk. The land, as poor as its people, holds no gold, silver, or other riches. For this reason, no country has ever waged war against the Tiny Kingdom, and the people have lived in peace for 100 years. But when Princess Mat Mat, ruler of the Tiny Kingdom, meets with her advisers to plan a great peace celebration, they bring bad news. A large fleet of warships is sailing toward them and will attack their people in just two days. With no army, no forts, and no arsenal, how can the princess defend her country? Her wisdom testifies that the most heroic action does not win wars, but prevents them. Princess Mat Mat devises a plan that includes, as an unexpected ally, the moon.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1975

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Middle Passage

by Tom Feelings and John Henrik Clarke

The Middle Passage is the name given to one of the most tragic ordeals in history: the cruel and terrifying journey of enslaved Africans across the Atlantic Ocean.

In this seminal work, master artist Tom Feelings tells the complete story of this horrific diaspora in sixty-four extraordinary narrative paintings. Achingly real, they draw us into the lives of the millions of African men, women, and children who were savagely torn from their beautiful homelands, crowded into disease-ridden "death ships", and transported under nightmarish conditions to the so-called New World.

An introduction by noted historian Dr. John Henrik Clarke traces the roots of the Atlantic slave trade and gives a vivid summary of its four centuries of brutality. The Middle Passage reaches us on a visceral level. No one can experience it and remain unmoved. But while we absorb the horror of these images, we also can find some hope in them. They are a tribute to the survival of the human spirit, and the humanity won by the survivors of the Middle Passage belongs to us all.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1996

Category: n/a

Award: Special Commendation

Amifika

by Lucille Clifton and Thomas Digrazia

When Amifika hears that his mother is going to get rid of things his father won't remember, Amifika thinks he might be one of those things since he can't remember his father. So, he looks for a place to hide...

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1978

Category: n/a

Award: Special Commendation

Sylvia and Aki

by Winifred Conkling

At the start of World War II, Japanese American third-grader Aki and her family are sent to an internment camp in Poston, Arizona, while Mexican American third-grader Sylvia's family leases their Orange County, California, farm and begins a fight to stop school segregation.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2012

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Wheel of King Asoka

by Ashok Davar

A brief account of King Asoka and how he ruled over his dynasty making it powerful and symbolized Ashoka Chakra. Throughout centuries the wheel of King Asoka has been there to inspire us to live as did this great king of India - in peace and love.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1978

Category: n/a

Award: Special Commendation


Showing 1 through 25 of 107 results