Special Collections

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winners

Description: The Jane Addams Childrens' Book Awards are given annually to those books of exceptional quality which promote the cause of peace, social justice, world community, and the equality of the sexes and all races.


Showing 1 through 25 of 98 results
 
 
 

Midnight Without a Moon

by Linda Williams Jackson

It’s Mississippi in the summer of 1955, and Rose Lee Carter can’t wait to move north. But for now, she’s living with her sharecropper grandparents on a white man’s cotton plantation.

Then, one town over, an African American boy, Emmett Till, is killed for allegedly whistling at a white woman. When Till’s murderers are unjustly acquitted, Rose realizes that the South needs a change . . . and that she should be part of the movement.

Linda Jackson’s moving debut seamlessly blends a fictional portrait of an African American family and factual events from a famous trial that provoked change in race relations in the United States.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Honors Book

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2018

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

Piecing Me Together

by Renée Watson

2018 Newbery Honor and Coretta Scott King Author Award Winner

Acclaimed author Renee Watson offers a powerful story about a girl striving for success in a world that too often seems like it's trying to break her.

Jade believes she must get out of her poor neighborhood if she's ever going to succeed.

Her mother tells her to take advantage of every opportunity that comes her way. And she has.

She accepted a scholarship to a mostly-white private school and even Saturday morning test prep opportunities. But some opportunities feel more demeaning than helpful.

Like an invitation to join Women to Women, a mentorship program for "at-risk" girls. Except really, it's for black girls. From "bad" neighborhoods.

And just because Maxine, her college-graduate mentor, is black doesn't mean she understands Jade.

And maybe there are some things Jade could show these successful women about the real world and finding ways to make a real difference.

NPR’s Best Books of 2017
A 2017 New York Public Library Best Teen Book of the Year
Chicago Public Library’s Best Books of 2017
A School Library Journal Best Book of 2017
Kirkus Reviews’ Best Teen Books of 2017
2018 Josette Frank Award Winner
A New York Times Bestseller

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Honors Book

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2018

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

We Will Not Be Silent

by Russell Freedman

Backed up by thorough research, Russell Freedman tells the story of Austrian-born Hans Scholl and his sister Sophie. They belonged to Hitler Youth as young children, but began to doubt the Nazi regime. As older students, the Scholls and a few friends formed the White Rose, a campaign of active resistance to Hitler and the Nazis. Risking imprisonment or even execution, the White Rose members distributed leaflets urging Germans to defy the Nazi government. Their belief that freedom was worth dying for will inspire young readers to stand up for what they believe in.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Winner of the Sibert Honor

Date Added: 06/12/2017


Year: 2017

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

Wolf Hollow

by Lauren Wolk

A young girl's kindness, compassion, and honesty overcome bullying.

Growing up in the shadows cast by two world wars, Annabelle has lived a mostly quiet, steady life in her small Pennsylvania town. Until the day new student Betty Glengarry walks into her class. Betty quickly reveals herself to be cruel and manipulative, and while her bullying seems isolated at first, things quickly escalate, and reclusive World War I veteran Toby becomes a target of her attacks. While others have always seen Toby’s strangeness, Annabelle knows only kindness. She will soon need to find the courage to stand as a lone voice of justice as tensions mount.

Brilliantly crafted, Wolf Hollow is a haunting tale of America at a crossroads and a time when one girl’s resilience, strength, and compassion help to illuminate the darkest corners of our history.

Winner of Newbery Honor

A New York Times Bestseller

Date Added: 06/12/2017


Year: 2017

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

Malala's Magic Pencil

by Kerascoet and Malala Yousafzai

Nobel Peace Prize winner and New York Times bestselling author Malala Yousafzai's first picture book, inspired by her own childhood.

Malala's first picture book will inspire young readers everywhere to find the magic all around them.

As a child in Pakistan, Malala made a wish for a magic pencil. She would use it to make everyone happy, to erase the smell of garbage from her city, to sleep an extra hour in the morning.

But as she grew older, Malala saw that there were more important things to wish for. She saw a world that needed fixing. And even if she never found a magic pencil, Malala realized that she could still work hard every day to make her wishes come true.

This beautifully illustrated volume tells Malala's story for a younger audience and shows them the worldview that allowed Malala to hold on to hope even in the most difficult of times.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2018

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Enemy: Detroit, 1954

by Sara Holbrook

Set in 1954, this compelling historical novel tells the story of a young girl’s struggles and triumphs in the aftermath of World War II. The war is over, but the threat of communism and the Cold War loom over the United States.

In Detroit, Michigan, twelve-year-old Marjorie Campbell struggles with the ups and downs of family life, dealing with her veteran father’s unpredictable outbursts, keeping her mother’s stash of banned library books a secret, and getting along with her new older “brother,” the teenager her family took in after his veteran father’s death.

When a new girl from Germany transfers to Marjorie’s class, Marjorie finds herself torn between befriending Inga and pleasing her best friend, Bernadette, by writing in a slam book that spreads rumors about Inga. Marjorie seems to be confronting enemies everywhere—at school, at the library, in her neighborhood, and even in the news.

In all this turmoil, Marjorie tries to find her own voice and figure out what is right and who the real enemies actually are. Includes an author’s note and bibliography.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2018

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

New Shoes

by Susan Lynn Meyer and Eric Velasquez

When her brother's hand-me-down shoes don't fit, it is time for Ella Mae to get new ones. She is ecstatic, but when she and her mother arrive at Mr. Johnson's shoe store, her happiness quickly turns to dejection.

Ella Mae is forced to wait when a customer arrives after her and is served first. Ella Mae is unable even to try on the shoes because of her skin color. Determined to fight back, Ella Mae and her friend Charlotte work tirelessly to collect and restore old shoes, wiping, washing, and polishing them to perfection.

The girls then have their very own shoe sale, giving the other African American members of their community a place to buy shoes where they can betreated fairly and "try on all the shoes they want. "

Set in the South during the time of segregation, this stunning picture book brings the civil rights era to life for contemporary readers.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2016

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Road from Home: The Story of an Armenian Girl

by David Kherdian

An extraordinary biography, this is also a record and reminder of yet another infamous holocaust in our century. Veron Dumehjian was born to a prosperous Armenian family, who lived in the Armenian quarter of the city of Aziziya, Turkey. Her early childhood was idyllic, until 1915, when the Turkish government, after years of persecuting its Christian minorities, decided to rid Turkey of its Armenian population. Veron was deported with her family and survived incredible hardship and suffering until, at the age of 16, she left for America as a "mail-order" bride. Poet-anthologist David Kherdian's story of his mother is a unique and gripping story of courage, survival and hope.

Newbery Medal Honor book

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1980

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Child of the Owl

by Laurence Yep

A young girl is sent to live with her grandmother in Chinatown and finds her Chinese heritage for the first time.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1978

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Delivering Justice: W. W. Law and the Fight for Civil Rights

by Jim Haskins

A respected biographer teams up with an acclaimed artist to tell the story of the mail carrier who orchestrated the Great Savannah Boycott -- and was instrumental in bringing equality to his community. "Grow up and be somebody," Westley Wallace Law's grandmother encouraged him as a young boy living in poverty in segregated Savannah, Georgia. Determined to make a difference in his community, W.W. Law assisted blacks in registering to vote, joined the NAACP and trained protesters in the use of nonviolent civil disobedience, and, in 1961, led the Great Savannah Boycott. In that famous protest, blacks refused to shop in downtown Savannah. When city leaders finally agreed to declare all of its citizens equal, Savannah became the first city in the south to end racial discrimination. A lifelong mail carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, W.W. Law saw fostering communication between blacks and whites as a fundamental part of his job. As this affecting biography makes clear, this "unsung hero" delivered far more than the mail to the citizens of the city he loved.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2006

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Queenie Peavy

by Robert Burch

Queenie Peavy is the worst troublemaker at school and the best shot in Georgia — with her father in jail, why shouldn't she be angry? But Queenie wonders what would happen if she tried to behave herself, just for one day...

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1967

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

With Courage and Cloth: Winning the Fight for a Woman's Right to Vote

by Ann Bausum

For grades 5 and up. With Courage and Cloth tells the story of how women fought for and won the right to vote in the United States. Over the course of seven compelling, fact-filled chapters-"Parade," "Rights," "Momentum," "Protest," "Prison," "Action," and "Victory"-the story of a brave struggle unfolds, showing how women used the democratic system that excluded them in order to become full voting citizens of their nation. The book starts with basic history on the struggle for women's rights, other groups' battles for the vote, and background on the 19th-century women's suffrage movement before focusing on the ultimately successful 20th century efforts to enfranchise women. It details and illustrates the political lobbying and public protests organized by women's groups led by suffragists like Alice Paul and the backlash against these efforts, including intimidation, imprisonment, hunger strikes, and forced feeding of prisoners. The book explains how support for women's suffrage grew, leading to the passage of the 19th Amendment in 1919, and the battle to get it ratified by three-fourths of the nation's 48 states. An afterword includes a discussion of the evolution of voting rights and women's rights since 1920, including the efforts to pass an equal rights amendment. This political struggle for equal rights under the law makes for an exciting story that demonstrates democracy in action and how people have worked to improve the system.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2005

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Composition

by Antonio Skármeta

In a village in Chile, Pedro and Daniel are two typical nine-year-old boys. Up until Daniel's father gets arrested, their biggest worry had been how to improve their soccer skills. Now, they are thrust into a situation where they must grapple with the incomprehensible: dictatorship and its inherent abuses. "The Composition" is a winner of the Americas Award for Children's Literature and the Jane Addams Children's Book Award.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2001

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

Patrol: An American Soldier In Vietnam

by Walter Dean Myers

Vietnam. A young American soldier waits for his enemy, rifle in hand, finger on the trigger. He is afraid to move and yet afraid not to move. Gunshots crackle in the still air. The soldier fires blindly into the distant trees at an unseen enemy. He crouches and waits -- heart pounding, tense and trembling, biting back tears. When will it all be over? Walter Dean Myers joined the army on his seventeeth birthday, at the onset of American involvement in Vietnam, but it was the death of his brother in 1968 that forever changed his mind about war. In a gripping and powerful story-poem, the award-winning author takes readers into the heart and mind of a young soldier in an alien land who comes face-to-face with the enemy.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2003

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

Ain't Gonna Study War No More: The Story of America's Peace Seekers

by Milton Meltzer

A history of those who have protested war with emphasis on the United States.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1986

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Little Fishes

by Erik Christian Haugaard

The story of a twelve-year-old Italian boy who, while suffering under German occupation, struggles to protect his spirit and humanity which was his late mother’s only wish.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1968

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Let Me Play: The Story of Title IX, the Law That Changed the Future of Girls in America

by Karen Blumenthal

In 1972, Congress passed a modest little law called Title IX, that said any school receiving money from the government couldn't treat boys and girls differently because of their sex. For the first time, girls across the United States got a real chance to play on the athletic field — and that little law took on a role far greater than anyone ever imagined it could.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2006

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Paul Robeson (Crowell Biographies)

by Eloise Greenfield

A biography of the black man who became a famous singer, actor, and spokesman for equal rights for his people.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1976

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

We Are One: the Story of Bayard Rustin

by Larry Dane Brimner

Bayard Rustin's life was dedicated to helping others-fighting injustices and discriminations-so that people could live as one. Protesting segregation long before there was a civil rights movement, he was often arrested for his beliefs and actions. As an organizer, Bayard was largely responsible for bringing people together to walk for freedom and jobs in Washington, D. C., on that memorable summer day, August 28, 1963.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2008

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Escape of Oney Judge: Martha Washington's Slave Finds Freedom

by Emily Arnold Mccully

When General George Washington is elected the first President of the United States, his wife chooses young Oney Judge, a house slave who works as a seamstress at Mount Vernon, to travel with her to the nation's capital in New York City as her personal maid. When the capital is moved to Philadelphia, the Washingtons and Oney move, too, and there Oney meets free blacks for the first time. At first Oney can't imagine being free - she depends on the Washingtons for food, warmth, and clothing. But then Mrs. Washington tells Oney that after her death she will be sent to live with Mrs. Washington's granddaughter. Oney is horrified because she knows it is likely that she will then be sold to a stranger - the worst fate she can imagine. Oney realizes she must run.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2008

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba's Struggle for Freedom

by Margarita Engle

It is 1896. Cuba has fought three wars for independence and still is not free. People have been rounded up in reconcentration camps with too little food and too much illness. Rosa is a nurse, but she dares not go to the camps. So she turns hidden caves into hospitals for those who know how to find her.

Black, white, Cuban, Spanish—Rosa does her best for everyone. Yet who can heal a country so torn apart by war? Acclaimed poet Margarita Engle has created another breathtaking portrait of Cuba.

The Surrender Tree is a 2009 Newbery Honor Book, the winner of the 2009 Pura Belpre Medal for Narrative and the 2009 Bank Street - Claudia Lewis Award, and a 2009 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2009

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Planting the Trees of Kenya: The Story of Wangari Maathai

by Claire A. Nivola

Wangari Maathai, winner of the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize and founder of the Green Belt Movement, grew up in the highlands of Kenya, where fig trees cloaked the hills, fish filled the streams, and the people tended their bountiful gardens. But over many years, as more and more land was cleared, Kenya was transformed. When Wangari returned home from college in America, she found the village gardens dry, the people malnourished, and the trees gone. How could she alone bring back the trees and restore the gardens and the people? Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature, says: “Wangari Maathai’s epic story has never been told better—-everyone who reads this book will want to plant a tree!” With glowing watercolor illustrations and lyrical prose, Claire Nivola tells the remarkable story of one woman’s effort to change the fate of her land by teaching many to care for it. An author’s note provides further information about Wangari Maathai and the Green Belt Movement. In keeping with the theme of the story, the book is printed on recycled paper.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2009

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Never to Forget: The Jews of the Holocaust

by Milton Meltzer

Six million Jews were killed in Europe between the years 1933 and 1945. What can that number mean to us today? We can that number mean to us today? We are told never to forget the Holocaust, but how can we remember something so incomprehensible?

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1977

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Taste of Salt: A Story of Modern Haiti

by Frances Temple

In the hospital after being beaten by Macoutes, seventeen-year-old Djo tells the story of his impoverished life to a young woman who, like him, has been working with the social reformer Father Aristide to fight the repression in Haiti.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1993

Category: Book for Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Journey of the Sparrows

by Fran Leeper Buss

Maria and her brother and sister, Salvadoran refugees, are smuggled into the United States in crates and try to eke out a living in Chicago with the help of a sympathetic family.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1992

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner


Showing 1 through 25 of 98 results