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Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winners

Description: The Jane Addams Childrens' Book Awards are given annually to those books of exceptional quality which promote the cause of peace, social justice, world community, and the equality of the sexes and all races. #award #kids


Showing 1 through 25 of 98 results
 
 
 

Midnight Without a Moon

by Linda Williams Jackson

It’s Mississippi in the summer of 1955, and Rose Lee Carter can’t wait to move north. But for now, she’s living with her sharecropper grandparents on a white man’s cotton plantation.

Then, one town over, an African American boy, Emmett Till, is killed for allegedly whistling at a white woman. When Till’s murderers are unjustly acquitted, Rose realizes that the South needs a change . . . and that she should be part of the movement.

Linda Jackson’s moving debut seamlessly blends a fictional portrait of an African American family and factual events from a famous trial that provoked change in race relations in the United States.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Honors Book

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2018

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

Piecing Me Together

by Renée Watson

2018 Newbery Honor and Coretta Scott King Author Award Winner

Acclaimed author Renee Watson offers a powerful story about a girl striving for success in a world that too often seems like it's trying to break her.

Jade believes she must get out of her poor neighborhood if she's ever going to succeed.

Her mother tells her to take advantage of every opportunity that comes her way. And she has.

She accepted a scholarship to a mostly-white private school and even Saturday morning test prep opportunities. But some opportunities feel more demeaning than helpful.

Like an invitation to join Women to Women, a mentorship program for "at-risk" girls. Except really, it's for black girls. From "bad" neighborhoods.

And just because Maxine, her college-graduate mentor, is black doesn't mean she understands Jade.

And maybe there are some things Jade could show these successful women about the real world and finding ways to make a real difference.

NPR’s Best Books of 2017
A 2017 New York Public Library Best Teen Book of the Year
Chicago Public Library’s Best Books of 2017
A School Library Journal Best Book of 2017
Kirkus Reviews’ Best Teen Books of 2017
2018 Josette Frank Award Winner
A New York Times Bestseller

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Honors Book

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2018

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

We Will Not Be Silent

by Russell Freedman

Backed up by thorough research, Russell Freedman tells the story of Austrian-born Hans Scholl and his sister Sophie. They belonged to Hitler Youth as young children, but began to doubt the Nazi regime. As older students, the Scholls and a few friends formed the White Rose, a campaign of active resistance to Hitler and the Nazis. Risking imprisonment or even execution, the White Rose members distributed leaflets urging Germans to defy the Nazi government. Their belief that freedom was worth dying for will inspire young readers to stand up for what they believe in.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Winner of the Sibert Honor

Date Added: 06/12/2017


Year: 2017

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

Wolf Hollow

by Lauren Wolk

A young girl's kindness, compassion, and honesty overcome bullying.

Growing up in the shadows cast by two world wars, Annabelle has lived a mostly quiet, steady life in her small Pennsylvania town. Until the day new student Betty Glengarry walks into her class. Betty quickly reveals herself to be cruel and manipulative, and while her bullying seems isolated at first, things quickly escalate, and reclusive World War I veteran Toby becomes a target of her attacks. While others have always seen Toby’s strangeness, Annabelle knows only kindness. She will soon need to find the courage to stand as a lone voice of justice as tensions mount.

Brilliantly crafted, Wolf Hollow is a haunting tale of America at a crossroads and a time when one girl’s resilience, strength, and compassion help to illuminate the darkest corners of our history.

Winner of Newbery Honor

A New York Times Bestseller

Date Added: 06/12/2017


Year: 2017

Category: Older Children

Award: Honors Book

Malala's Magic Pencil

by Kerascoet and Malala Yousafzai

Nobel Peace Prize winner and New York Times bestselling author Malala Yousafzai's first picture book, inspired by her own childhood.

Malala's first picture book will inspire young readers everywhere to find the magic all around them.

As a child in Pakistan, Malala made a wish for a magic pencil. She would use it to make everyone happy, to erase the smell of garbage from her city, to sleep an extra hour in the morning.

But as she grew older, Malala saw that there were more important things to wish for. She saw a world that needed fixing. And even if she never found a magic pencil, Malala realized that she could still work hard every day to make her wishes come true.

This beautifully illustrated volume tells Malala's story for a younger audience and shows them the worldview that allowed Malala to hold on to hope even in the most difficult of times.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2018

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Enemy

by Sara Holbrook

Set in 1954, this compelling historical novel tells the story of a young girl’s struggles and triumphs in the aftermath of World War II. The war is over, but the threat of communism and the Cold War loom over the United States.

In Detroit, Michigan, twelve-year-old Marjorie Campbell struggles with the ups and downs of family life, dealing with her veteran father’s unpredictable outbursts, keeping her mother’s stash of banned library books a secret, and getting along with her new older “brother,” the teenager her family took in after his veteran father’s death.

When a new girl from Germany transfers to Marjorie’s class, Marjorie finds herself torn between befriending Inga and pleasing her best friend, Bernadette, by writing in a slam book that spreads rumors about Inga. Marjorie seems to be confronting enemies everywhere—at school, at the library, in her neighborhood, and even in the news.

In all this turmoil, Marjorie tries to find her own voice and figure out what is right and who the real enemies actually are. Includes an author’s note and bibliography.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2018

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

New Shoes

by Susan Lynn Meyer and Eric Velasquez

When her brother's hand-me-down shoes don't fit, it is time for Ella Mae to get new ones. She is ecstatic, but when she and her mother arrive at Mr. Johnson's shoe store, her happiness quickly turns to dejection.

Ella Mae is forced to wait when a customer arrives after her and is served first. Ella Mae is unable even to try on the shoes because of her skin color. Determined to fight back, Ella Mae and her friend Charlotte work tirelessly to collect and restore old shoes, wiping, washing, and polishing them to perfection.

The girls then have their very own shoe sale, giving the other African American members of their community a place to buy shoes where they can betreated fairly and "try on all the shoes they want. "

Set in the South during the time of segregation, this stunning picture book brings the civil rights era to life for contemporary readers.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2016

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Stick-in-the-mud

by Jean Ketchum

Tomba was a small boy who lived in a village where all the houses were made of mud. When the rains came every year, all the people sat around in the wet. Tomba had an idea that if the huts were put on sticks, they wouldn't have to be uncomfortable. But the villagers had always lived that way and didn't want to listen to a small boy. But many times a new approach to a problem will solve, and Tomba did.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1954

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Rain Of Fire

by Marion Dane Bauer

When Steve's older brother Matthew, returning home after service in World War II, refuses to talk about his wartime experiences, Steve's friends begin to doubt the stories he has told of Matthew's heroism.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1984

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

This Land Is My Land

by George Littlechild

Artist George Littlechild shows and tells us what it means to be a young Native artist living on the cusp of the 21st century. Giving thanks to the ancestors who have guided him, he documents the struggles of Native peoples and offers us stories of delight, humor and healing.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1994

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

Martin's Big Words

by Doreen Rappaport

This picture book biography of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. brings his life and the profound nature of his message to young children through his own words. Martin Luther King, Jr. , was one of the most influential and gifted speakers of all time. Doreen Rappaport uses quotes from some of his most beloved speeches to tell the story of his life and his work in a simple, direct way. A timeline and a list of additional books and web sites help make this a standout biography of Dr. King.

Winner of the Caldecott Honor

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2002

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

Delivering Justice

by Jim Haskins

A respected biographer teams up with an acclaimed artist to tell the story of the mail carrier who orchestrated the Great Savannah Boycott -- and was instrumental in bringing equality to his community. "Grow up and be somebody," Westley Wallace Law's grandmother encouraged him as a young boy living in poverty in segregated Savannah, Georgia. Determined to make a difference in his community, W.W. Law assisted blacks in registering to vote, joined the NAACP and trained protesters in the use of nonviolent civil disobedience, and, in 1961, led the Great Savannah Boycott. In that famous protest, blacks refused to shop in downtown Savannah. When city leaders finally agreed to declare all of its citizens equal, Savannah became the first city in the south to end racial discrimination. A lifelong mail carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, W.W. Law saw fostering communication between blacks and whites as a fundamental part of his job. As this affecting biography makes clear, this "unsung hero" delivered far more than the mail to the citizens of the city he loved.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2006

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Nasreen's Secret School

by Jeanette Winter

Based on a true story. After her parents are taken away by the Taliban, young Nasreen stops speaking. But as she spends time in a secret school, she slowly breaks out of her shell.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2010

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Parvana's Journey

by Deborah Ellis

In this sequel to "The Breadwinner, " the Taliban still control Afghanistan, but Kabul is in ruins. Twelve-year-old Parvana's father has just died, and her mother, sister, and brother could be anywhere in the country. Parvana sets out alone to find them, masquerading as a boy, and she meets other children who are victims of war.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2003

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Out of Bounds

by Beverley Naidoo

We are the young people,

We will not be broken!

We demand freedom

And say

"Away with slavery

In our land of Africa!"

For almost fifty years apartheid forced the young people of South Africa to live apart as Blacks, Whites, Indians, and "Coloreds." This unique and dramatic collection of stories -- by native South African and Carnegie Medalist Beverley Naidoo -- is about young people's choices in a beautiful country made ugly by injustice.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner Each story is set in a different decade during the last half of the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, and features fictional characters caught up in very real events. Included is a Timeline Across Apartheid, which recounts some of the restrictive laws passed during this era, the events leading up to South Africa's first free democratic elections, and the establishment of a new "rainbow government" that leads the country today. A Junior Library Guild Selection

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2004

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Meeting with a Stranger

by Duane Bradley

Cantuffa is a thick thorn bush which once covered much of the land of Ethiopia, preventing any progress until it had been cut away. For this reason an emperor about to make a voyage across the country proclaimed, "Cut down the cantuffa in the four quarters of the world, for I know not where I am going."

This story helps to shack away at some of the thorns which still obscure this nation. It describes the young boy Teffera, left in charge of his family's farm and sheep while his father was undergoing an operation. When a ferangi, an American, came to his small village to help teach new methods of caring for the sheep, Teffera had to decide whether he should accept this advice. His people had had substantial reason to mistrust the Westerners, and he was instilled with pride in own traditions, but on the other hand his flocks were dying.

This book has the dual value of illuminating the character of the Ethiopian peasant and of providing an insight into the problems they must face in adapting to progress while maintaining their national spirit.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1965

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Habibi

by Naomi Shihab Nye

Fourteen-year-old Liyana Abboud would rather not have to change her life...especially now that she has been kissed, for the very first time and quite by surprise, by a boy named Jackson. But when her parents announce that Liyana's family is moving from St. Louis, Missouri, to Jerusalem -- to the land where her father was born -- Liyana's whole world shifts. What does Jerusalem hold for Liyana? A grandmother, a Sitti, she has never met, for one. A history much bigger than she is. Visits to the West Bank village where her aunts and uncles live. Mischief. Old stone streets that wind through time and trouble. Opening doors, dark jail cells, a new feeling for peace, and Omer...the intriguing stranger whose kisses replace the one she lost when she moved across the ocean.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1998

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Taste of Salt

by Frances Temple

In the hospital after being beaten by Macoutes, seventeen-year-old Djo tells the story of his impoverished life to a young woman who, like him, has been working with the social reformer Father Aristide to fight the repression in Haiti.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1993

Category: Book for Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Princess And The Admiral

by Charlotte Pomerantz and Tony Chen

A small patch of dry Asian land called the Tiny Kingdom serves as the home for a community of poor farmers and fisherfolk. The land, as poor as its people, holds no gold, silver, or other riches. For this reason, no country has ever waged war against the Tiny Kingdom, and the people have lived in peace for 100 years. But when Princess Mat Mat, ruler of the Tiny Kingdom, meets with her advisers to plan a great peace celebration, they bring bad news. A large fleet of warships is sailing toward them and will attack their people in just two days. With no army, no forts, and no arsenal, how can the princess defend her country? Her wisdom testifies that the most heroic action does not win wars, but prevents them. Princess Mat Mat devises a plan that includes, as an unexpected ally, the moon.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1975

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Emma's Poem

by Linda Glaser

Give me your tired, your poor

Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free...

Who wrote these words? And why?

In 1883, Emma Lazarus, deeply moved by an influx of immigrants from Eastern Europe, wrote a sonnet that was to give voice to the Statue of Liberty. Originally a gift from France to celebrate our shared national struggles for liberty, the Statue, thanks to Emma's poem, slowly came to shape our hearts, defining us as a nation that welcomes and gives refuge to those who come to our shores.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2011

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom

by Susan Buckley and Lynda Blackmon Lowery and Elspeth Leacock and Pj Loughran

A memoir of the Civil Rights Movement from one of its youngest heroes

As the youngest marcher in the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Albama, Lynda Blackmon Lowery proved that young adults can be heroes. Jailed eleven times before her fifteenth birthday, Lowery fought alongside Martin Luther King, Jr. for the rights of African-Americans. In this memoir, she shows today's young readers what it means to fight nonviolently (even when the police are using violence, as in the Bloody Sunday protest) and how it felt to be part of changing American history.

Straightforward and inspiring, this beautifully illustrated memoir brings readers into the middle of the Civil Rights Movement, complementing Common Core classroom learning and bringing history alive for young readers.

Winner of the Sibert Honor

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2016

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Other Side of Truth

by Beverley Naidoo

Will the truth harm them -- or save them?

When Nigeria's corrupt military government kills their mother, twelve-year-old Sade and her brother Femi think their lives are over. Out of fear for their safety, their father, an outspoken journalist, decides to smuggle the children out of Nigeria and into London, where their uncle lives.

But when they get to the cold and massive city, they find themselves lost and alone, with no one to trust and no idea when -- or if -- they will ever see their father again. The Other Side of Truth is a gripping adventure story about courage, family, and the power of truth.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2002

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Queenie Peavy

by Robert Burch

Queenie Peavy is the worst troublemaker at school and the best shot in Georgia — with her father in jail, why shouldn't she be angry? But Queenie wonders what would happen if she tried to behave herself, just for one day...

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1967

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Little Fishes

by Erik Christian Haugaard

The story of a twelve-year-old Italian boy who, while suffering under German occupation, struggles to protect his spirit and humanity which was his late mother’s only wish.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1968

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Looking Out

by Victoria Boutis

Though pleased to be part of the "in" crowd at her new school, Ellen's growing awareness of her parents' social concerns, expressed in their support of the condemned Rosenbergs, forces her to make a choice about what really matters in life.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1989

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner


Showing 1 through 25 of 98 results