Special Collections

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winners

Description: The Jane Addams Childrens' Book Awards are given annually to those books of exceptional quality which promote the cause of peace, social justice, world community, and the equality of the sexes and all races. #award #kids


Showing 1 through 25 of 98 results
 
 
 

Ain't Gonna Study War No More

by Milton Meltzer

A history of those who have protested war with emphasis on the United States.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1986

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

All The Colors Of The Race

by Arnold Adoff and John L. Steptoe

A collection of poems written from the point of view of a child with a black mother and a white father.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1983

Category: n/a

Award: Special Commendation

Amifika

by Lucille Clifton and Thomas Digrazia

When Amifika hears that his mother is going to get rid of things his father won't remember, Amifika thinks he might be one of those things since he can't remember his father. So, he looks for a place to hide...

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1978

Category: n/a

Award: Special Commendation

Anthony Burns

by Virginia Hamilton

The true story of a young man struggling for freedom at the dawn of the Civil War Anthony Burns is a runaway slave who has just started to build a life for himself in Boston. Then his former owner comes to town to collect him. Anthony won't go willingly, though, and people across the city step forward to make sure he's not taken.

Based on the true story of a man who stood up against the Fugitive Slave Law, Hamilton's gripping account follows the battle in the streets and in the courts to keep Burns a citizen of Boston--a battle that is the prelude to the nation's bloody Civil War.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1989

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Aunt Harriet's Underground Railroad In The Sky

by Faith Ringgold

Cassie, who flew above New York in Tar Beach, soars into the sky once more. This time, she and her brother Be Be meet a train full of people, and Be Be joins them. But the train departs before Cassie can climb aboard. With Harriet Tubman as her guide, Cassie retraces the steps escaping slaves took on the real Underground Railroad and is finally reunited with her brother at the story's end.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1993

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

Bat 6

by Virginia Euwer Wolff

The sixth-grade girls of Barlow and Bear Creek Ridge have been waiting to play in the annual softball game -- the Bat 6 -- for as long as they can remember.

But something is different this year. There's a new girl on both teams, each with a secret in her past that puts them on a collision course set to explode on game day. No one knows how to stop it. All they can do is watch...

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1999

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

Berries Goodman

by Emily Cheney Neville

The Goodman family move to the suburbs and nine-year-old Berries finds his nearest playmate is a girl, Sandra. She is a year older than Berries, feels superior in many ways, and undertakes to teach him prejudice against Jews.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1966

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Big Book for Peace

by Lloyd Alexander and Marilyn Sachs and Lois Lowry and Yoshiko Uchida and Katherine Paterson and Jean Fritz and Natalie Babbitt and Nancy Willard and Myra Cohn Livingston and Charlotte Zolotow and John Bierhorst and Thacher Hurd and Steven Kellogg and Milton Meltzer and Mildred Pitts Walter and Jean Craighead George

The wisdom of peace and the absurdity of fighting are demonstrated in seventeen stories and poems by outstanding authors of today such as Jean Fritz, Milton Meltzer, and Nancy Willard.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1991

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Blue Mystery

by Margot Benary-Isbert

The principal event is the disappearance of a blue gloxinia, [Blue Mystery] a special flower of Dr. Benninger's, and the clearance of Fridolin from suspicion.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1957

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Brave Girl

by Michelle Markel

From acclaimed author Michelle Markel and Caldecott Honor artist Melissa Sweet comes this true story of Clara Lemlich, a young Ukrainian immigrant who led the largest strike of women workers in U. S. history.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2014

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Breadwinner

by Deborah Ellis

Young Parvana lives with her family in one room of a bombed-out apartment building in Kabul, Afghanistan. Because Parvana's father has a foreign education, he is arrested by the Taliban. The family becomes increasingly desperate until Parvana conceives a plan.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2004

Category: n/a

Award: Special Commendation

The Cay

by Theodore Taylor

Phillip is excited when the Germans invade the small island of Curaçao. War has always been a game to him, and he’s eager to glimpse it firsthand–until the freighter he and his mother are traveling to the United States on is torpedoed.

When Phillip comes to, he is on a small raft in the middle of the sea. Besides Stew Cat, his only companion is an old West Indian, Timothy. Phillip remembers his mother’s warning about black people: “They are different, and they live differently.”

But by the time the castaways arrive on a small island, Phillip’s head injury has made him blind and dependent on Timothy.

· A New York Times Best Book of the Year

· A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year

· A Horn Book Honor Book

· An American Library Association Notable Book

· A Publishers Weekly Children’s Book to Remember

· A Child Study Association’s Pick of Children’s Books of the Year

· Lewis Carroll Shelf Award

· Commonwealth Club of California: Literature Award

· Southern California Council on Literature for Children and Young People Award

· Woodward School Annual Book Award

· Friends of the Library Award, University of California at Irvine

· Jane Addams Book Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1970

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Child of the Owl

by Laurence Yep

A young girl is sent to live with her grandmother in Chinatown and finds her Chinese heritage for the first time.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1978

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Children as Teachers of Peace

by Gerald G. Jampolsky

This book by our children is the result of a joyous journey. From the day we were inspired by the realization of the truth in the words "Children as Teachers of Peace"... to the invitation we issued that same week to children throughout the country to express their thoughts and advice about peace... to the day only five weeks later when this book was delivered to the publisher, we have been profoundly moved by the truth our children speak for all of us.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1983

Category: n/a

Award: Special Commendation

The Composition

by Antonio Skármeta

In a village in Chile, Pedro and Daniel are two typical nine-year-old boys. Up until Daniel's father gets arrested, their biggest worry had been how to improve their soccer skills. Now, they are thrust into a situation where they must grapple with the incomprehensible: dictatorship and its inherent abuses. "The Composition" is a winner of the Americas Award for Children's Literature and the Jane Addams Children's Book Award.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2001

Category: Picture Book

Award: Medal Winner

Delivering Justice

by Jim Haskins

A respected biographer teams up with an acclaimed artist to tell the story of the mail carrier who orchestrated the Great Savannah Boycott -- and was instrumental in bringing equality to his community. "Grow up and be somebody," Westley Wallace Law's grandmother encouraged him as a young boy living in poverty in segregated Savannah, Georgia. Determined to make a difference in his community, W.W. Law assisted blacks in registering to vote, joined the NAACP and trained protesters in the use of nonviolent civil disobedience, and, in 1961, led the Great Savannah Boycott. In that famous protest, blacks refused to shop in downtown Savannah. When city leaders finally agreed to declare all of its citizens equal, Savannah became the first city in the south to end racial discrimination. A lifelong mail carrier for the U.S. Postal Service, W.W. Law saw fostering communication between blacks and whites as a fundamental part of his job. As this affecting biography makes clear, this "unsung hero" delivered far more than the mail to the citizens of the city he loved.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2006

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Each Kindness

by Jacqueline Woodson and E. B. Lewis

Each kindness makes the world a little better. Chloe and her friends won't play with the new girl, Maya.

Maya is different--she wears hand-me-downs and plays with old-fashioned toys.

Every time Maya tries to join Chloe and her gang, they reject her.

Eventually, Maya plays alone, and then stops coming to school altogether.

When Chloe's teacher gives a lesson about how even small acts of kindness can change the world, Chloe is stung by the lost opportunity for friendship, and thinks about how much better it could have been if she'd shown a little kindness toward Maya.

This unforgettable book is written and illustrated by the award-winning team that created The Other Side and the Caldecott Honor winner Coming On Home Soon.

With its powerful message and striking art, it will resonate with readers long after they've put it down.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2013

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Emma's Poem

by Linda Glaser

Give me your tired, your poor

Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free...

Who wrote these words? And why?

In 1883, Emma Lazarus, deeply moved by an influx of immigrants from Eastern Europe, wrote a sonnet that was to give voice to the Statue of Liberty. Originally a gift from France to celebrate our shared national struggles for liberty, the Statue, thanks to Emma's poem, slowly came to shape our hearts, defining us as a nation that welcomes and gives refuge to those who come to our shores.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2011

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Endless Steppe

by Esther Hautzig

A young Polish girl, her father, her mother, and her grandmother are taken prisoner by the Russians during World War II, evicted from their home, and shipped in a filthy cattle car to a forced-labor camp in a remote, impoverished Siberian village. For four terrible years, the family struggles for beds, food, clothing, fuel--all the everyday things that one takes for granted. Despite bitter hardships, the family makes a new life with new friends. And they never lose their deep affection and trust in one another. Esther Rudomin Hautzig's account of her childhood in Siberia is a magnificent story of the triumph of the human spirit.

A Jane Addams Children's Book Award Winner.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1969

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

The Enemy

by Sara Holbrook

Set in 1954, this compelling historical novel tells the story of a young girl’s struggles and triumphs in the aftermath of World War II. The war is over, but the threat of communism and the Cold War loom over the United States.

In Detroit, Michigan, twelve-year-old Marjorie Campbell struggles with the ups and downs of family life, dealing with her veteran father’s unpredictable outbursts, keeping her mother’s stash of banned library books a secret, and getting along with her new older “brother,” the teenager her family took in after his veteran father’s death.

When a new girl from Germany transfers to Marjorie’s class, Marjorie finds herself torn between befriending Inga and pleasing her best friend, Bernadette, by writing in a slam book that spreads rumors about Inga. Marjorie seems to be confronting enemies everywhere—at school, at the library, in her neighborhood, and even in the news.

In all this turmoil, Marjorie tries to find her own voice and figure out what is right and who the real enemies actually are. Includes an author’s note and bibliography.

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Medal Winner

Date Added: 05/15/2018


Year: 2018

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Escape of Oney Judge

by Emily Arnold Mccully

When General George Washington is elected the first President of the United States, his wife chooses young Oney Judge, a house slave who works as a seamstress at Mount Vernon, to travel with her to the nation's capital in New York City as her personal maid. When the capital is moved to Philadelphia, the Washingtons and Oney move, too, and there Oney meets free blacks for the first time. At first Oney can't imagine being free - she depends on the Washingtons for food, warmth, and clothing. But then Mrs. Washington tells Oney that after her death she will be sent to live with Mrs. Washington's granddaughter. Oney is horrified because she knows it is likely that she will then be sold to a stranger - the worst fate she can imagine. Oney realizes she must run.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2008

Category: Younger Children

Award: Medal Winner

Esperanza Rising

by Pam Muñoz Ryan

Esperanza thought she'd always live with her family on their ranch in Mexico--she'd always have fancy dresses, a beautiful home, and servants. But a sudden tragedy forces Esperanza and Mama to flee to California during the Great Depression, and to settle in a camp for Mexican farm workers. Esperanza isn't ready for the hard labor, financial struggles, or lack of acceptance she now faces. When their new life is threatened, Esperanza must find a way to rise above her difficult circumstances--Mama's life, and her own, depend on it.

Winner of the Pura Belpre Medal

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2001

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

First Woman In Congress

by Florence Meiman White

A biography of the first woman elected to Congress, who spent the 92 years of her life as a leader for woman suffrage, a lobbyist, and a social reformer.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1981

Category: n/a

Award: Medal Winner

Freedom's Children

by Ellen S. Levine

In this inspiring collection of true stories, thirty African-Americans who were children or teenagers in the 1950s and 1960s talk about what it was like for them to fight segregation in the South-to sit in an all-white restaurant and demand to be served, to refuse to give up a seat at the front of the bus, to be among the first to integrate the public schools, and to face violence, arrest, and even death for the cause of freedom."Thrilling...Nothing short of wonderful."-The New York TimesAwards:( A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year( A Booklist Editors' Choice

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1994

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner

The Girl From the Tar Paper School

by Teri Kanefield

Before the Little Rock Nine, before Rosa Parks, before Martin Luther King Jr. and his March on Washington, there was Barbara Rose Johns, a teenager who used nonviolent civil disobedience to draw attention to her cause. In 1951, witnessing the unfair conditions in her racially segregated high school, Barbara Johns led a walkout--the first public protest of its kind demanding racial equality in the U.S.--jumpstarting the American civil rights movement. Ridiculed by the white superintendent and school board, local newspapers, and others, and even after a cross was burned on the school grounds, Barbara and her classmates held firm and did not give up. Her school's case went all the way to the Supreme Court and helped end segregation as part of Brown v. Board of Education.

Jane Addams Children’s Book Award Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2015

Category: Older Children

Award: Medal Winner


Showing 1 through 25 of 98 results