Special Collections

National Education Association's Asian American Booklist

Description: Bookshare is pleased to offer the following titles from The National Education Association's Asian American Booklist. #kids #teens #teachers


Showing 76 through 100 of 106 results

Tea with Milk

by Allen Say

At home in San Francisco, May speaks Japanese and the family eats rice and miso soup and drinks green tea. When she visits her friends' homes, she eats fried chicken and spaghetti. May plans someday to go to college and live in an apartment of her own. But when her family moves back to Japan, she soon feels lost and homesick for America. In Japan everyone calls her by her Japanese name, Masako. She has to wear kimonos and sit on the floor. Poor May is sure that she will never feel at home in this country. Eventually May is expected to marry and a matchmaker is hired. Outraged at the thought, May sets out to find her own way in the big city of Osaka. Allen Say has created a moving tribute to his parents and their path to discovering where home really is.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Goodbye Vietnam

by Gloria Whelan

Thirteen-year-old Mai and her family embark on a dangerous sea voyage from Vietnam to Hong Kong to escape the unpredictable and often brutal Vietnamese government.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Motherland

by Vineeta Vijayraghavan

Maya is an American teenager who spent her first four years with her grandmother in India. In her 15th year she returns to India and she is again initiated into the Indian culture and customs.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


The Bicycle Man

by Allen Say

The amazing tricks two American soldiers do on a borrowed bicycle are a fitting finale for the school sports day festivities in a small village in occupied Japan. Includes picture descriptions.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Allison

by Allen Say

When Allison tries on her new red kimono and looks in the mirror, she suddenly realizes that she looks more like her favorite doll, Mei Mei, than her parents. Where did Mei Mei come from? Where do I come from?" Allison asks. "Far, far away -- from another country; Father says."Mother and I went there and brought you and Mei Mei home with us." But Allison is confused. At daycare the next day, she refuses to climb the monkey bars or play tag with the other children, and alone in her room that night she asks Mei Mei, "Allison isn't my real name. Do you know what it is?" But the only answer is the cry of a stray cat looking in her window. Through evocative watercolors and understated prose, Caldecott Medalist Allen Say creates a moving statement on families, adoption, and the search for belonging.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Stranger in the Mirror

by Allen Say

One morning eight-year-old Martin looks in the mirror and sees a stranger. Overnight, he has changed. His parents take him to one doctor after another, only to be told that there is nothing wrong with their son. At school his teacher asks, "What have we here, trick or treat?" His classmates will not play with him. At home his family tries to treat him as if he were the same child. But things now are different. Martin has grown very old in the space of one day. His world will never be the same again.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Night Garden

by Janet S. Wong

A collection of poems describing a variety of dreams, some familiar, some strange, some beautiful, and some on the darker side.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Olvina Flies

by Grace Lin

When Olvina gets invited to the Tenth Annual Bird Convention in Hawaii, she decides it's high time to overcome her fear of flying. But on the day of her big plane trip, Olvina's tummy is filled with butterflies and she has second thoughts. After all, chickens aren't supposed to fly. Or are they? This tender and funny story is for children who love to fly as well as those who have not yet had the experience. From takeoff to landing, Olvina's journey is one kids won't want to miss!

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year of Impossible Goodbyes

by Sook Nyul Choi

A young Korean girl survives the oppressive Japanese and Russian occupation of North Korea during the 1940s, to later escape to freedom in South Korea.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


The Key Collection

by Andrea Cheng

A ten-year-old boy in the Midwest misses his Chinese grandmother, who always lived next door until her health caused her to move.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Peace Crane

by Sheila Hamanaka

After learning about the Peace Crane, created by Sadako, a survivor of the bombing of Hiroshima, a young African American girl wishes it would carry her away from the violence of her own world.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


The Golem and the Dragon Girl

by Sonia Levitin

Laurel Wang is not crazy. She knows that the ghost of her beloved great-grandfather lives in the oak tree outside her house. But now her grandparents are arriving from China, and the family must move to a bigger place - leaving the protective spirit behind. Twelve-year-old Jonathan and his family are moving into Laurel's house - and he's not too happy either. He's already living with a stepfather he can't stand and a dog he didn't choose; now he has to say goodbye to a familiar neighborhood and his wonderful Uncle Jake. But moving blues soon give way to angry ghosts, fortune cookies that predict the future, and a very scary accident - as two teenagers with very different backgrounds join together to investigate a mystery, and discover something remarkable about each other...

Date Added: 05/25/2017


The Best Bad Thing

by Yoshiko Uchida

Date Added: 05/25/2017


My Chinatown

by Kam Mak

Chinatown -- a place of dragons and dreams; fireflies and memories Chinatown -- full of wonder and magic; fireworks on New Year's Day and a delicious smell on every corner Chinatown -- where every day brings something familiar and something wondrously new to a small boy Chinatown -- home? Kam Mak grew up in a place of two cultures, one existing within the other. Using moving poems, he shares a year of growing up in this small city within a city, which is called Chinatown.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Dia's Story Cloth

by Dia Cha

The story cloth made for the author by her aunt and uncle chronicles the life of the Hmong people in their native Laos and their eventual emigration to the United States.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


The Rainbow People

by Laurence Yep

A collection of twenty Chinese folktales that were passed on by word of mouth for generations, as told by some old-timers newly settled in the United States.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


A Thousand Peaks

by Siyu Liu and Orel Protopopescu

China's poets have created shi, poems that follow strict rules of structure and rhythm, for several thousand years. Here are thirty-five shi from the Han dynasty to the modern era, in English and Chinese.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Rebels of the Heavenly Kingdom

by Katherine Paterson

Newbery Medal author Paterson presents the story of Wang Lee, the young son of starving peasants in 1850's China. Seized by bandits and carried away from home during the Taiping Rebellion, Wang Lee meets Mai Lin when members of her undercover society save him from his captors.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Shizuko's Daughter

by Kyoko Mori

Shizuko commits suicide to avoid being a hindrance to her husbandÂ’s affair. Yuki, her daughter, grows up without the love of a mother but lives with the memories of her mother. The story brings out the struggles and achievements of Yuki.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Boxing in Black and White

by Peter Bacho

Text and photographs present some of the notable heavyweight boxing matches of the twentieth century, featuring such fighters as Jack Dempsey, Joe Louis, and Muhammad Ali.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


The Star Fisher

by Laurence Yep

In 1927, Joan Lee and her family are the first Chinese-Americans that Clarksburg has ever seen. Joan knows she's American. But no one else seems to think so.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


In the Snow

by Huy Voun Lee

A simple introduction to Chinese character writing. It's a wonderful day for a walk in the snow. Using snow as her canvas, Xiao Ming's mother teaches her son ten new Chinese characters. Huy Voun Lee's focus on the similarity between writing Chinese characters and drawing pictures makes learning Chinese seem accessible. Simple mnemonic explanations help children learn and remember the character for each word. "In the Snow" is a great introduction to one of the world's oldest picture languages.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Tae's Sonata

by Haemi Balgassi

Tae, a Korean American eighth grader, tries to sort out her feelings when she is assigned a popular cute boy as a partner for a school report and later has a falling out with her best friend.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


A Single Shard

by Linda Sue Park

In this Newbery Medal-winning book set in 12th century Korea, Tree-ear, a 13-year-old orphan, lives under a bridge in Ch'ulp'o, a potters' village famed for delicate celadon ware. He has become fascinated with the potter's craft; he wants nothing more than to watch master potter Min at work, and he dreams of making a pot of his own someday.

When Min takes Tree-ear on as his helper, Tree-ear is elated -- until he finds obstacles in his path: the backbreaking labor of digging and hauling clay, Min's irascible temper, and his own ignorance. But Tree-ear is determined to prove himself -- even if it means taking a long, solitary journey on foot to present Min's work in the hope of a royal commission... even if it means arriving at the royal court with nothing to show but a single celadon shard.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Angelfish

by Laurence Yep

Robin, a young ballet dancer who is half Chinese and half white, works in a fish store for Mr. Tsow, a brusque Chinese who accuses her of being a half person and who harbors a bitter secret.

Date Added: 05/25/2017



Showing 76 through 100 of 106 results