Special Collections

Multicultural Books for Children and Teens

Description: Celebrate diversity of cultures with the National Education Association, the Association for Library Services to Children, the Cooperative Children's Book Center, et al. #kids #teens


Showing 101 through 125 of 155 results

The Young Landlords

by Walter Dean Myers

Five devoted friends become landlords and try to make their Harlem neighborhood a better place to live.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


The People Could Fly

by Virginia Hamilton

24 folktales briefly and dramatically told lend themselves to be read aloud or acted out around campfires, on stormy nights, or to be discussed for readers of all ages. Their heroes prevail through cleverness, perseverance, quick thinking and, often, magic. The stories come from far and wide where enslavement of Africans was practiced from Portugal, to the United States, to the Cape Verde Islands. After each story, Virginia Hamilton, the Newberry Award winning author, provides concise information about its source, history, symbols, storytelling elements and interpretation. Find out how the lion who goes about scaring the other animals by roaring, "Me and myself!" is silenced, how Little Daughter evades a stalking wolf with her goodest, sweetest, song, and how a man whose horse and grandmother is killed by a bully, avoids being killed himself, becomes wealthy, and brings the brute to justice. In one story a young man uses his three obedient rabbits to outwit a princess, queen, and king, catching them in a sackful of lies. Another story warns that should you ever cut off a creature's big , long tail and eat it, it will come for you in the night calling for you to give it's, "tailypo," back. It will creep up your wall, through your window, across your floor, on to your bed and you'll be too scared to move, too scared to scream...

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Red Scarf Girl

by Ji-Li Jiang

It's 1966, and twelve-year-old Ji-li Jiang has everything a girl could want: brains, tons of friends, and a bright future in Communist China. But it's also the year that China's leader, Mao Ze-dong, launches the Cultural Revolution-and Ji-li's world begins to fall apart. Over the next few years, people who were once her friends and neighbors turn on her and her family, forcing them to live in constant terror of arrest. When Ji-li's father is finally imprisoned, she faces the most difficult dilemma of her life. This is the true story of one girl's determination to hold her family together during one of the most terrifying eras of the twentieth century.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Los Gatos Black on Halloween

by Marisa Montes

Follow los monstruos and los esqueletos to the Halloween party. Under October's luna, full and bright, the monsters are throwing a ball in the Haunted Hall. Las brujas come on their broomsticks. Los muertos rise from their coffins to join in the fun. Los esqueletos rattle their bones as they dance through the door. And the scariest creatures of all aren't even there yet! This lively bilingual Halloween poem introduces young readers to a spooky array of Spanish words that will open their ojos to the chilling delights of the season.

Winner of the Pura Belpre Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


What Can You Do with a Paleta?

by Carmen Tafolla and Magaly Morales

Where the paleta wagon rings its tinkly belland carries a treasure of icy paletasin every color of the sarape . . .As she strolls through her barrio, a young girl introduces readers to the frozen, fruit-flavored treat that thrills Mexican and Mexican-American children. Create a masterpiece, make tough choices (strawberry or coconut?), or cool off on a warm summer's day--there's so much to do with a paleta.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Slam!

by Walter Dean Myers

Seventeen-year-old Greg "Slam" Harris can do it on the basketball court. He's seen ballplayers come and go, he knows he could be one of the lucky ones. Maybe he'll make it to the top. Or he'll stumble along the way. Slam's grades aren't that hot.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Forged By Fire

by Sharon M. Draper

When Gerald was a child he was fascinated by fire. But fire is dangerous and powerful, and tragedy strikes. His substance-addicted mother is taken from him. Then he loses the loving generosity of a favorite aunt. A brutal stepfather with a flaming temper and an evil secret makes his life miserable. The one bright light in Gerald's life is his little half sister, Angel, whom he struggles to protect from her father, Jordan Sparks, who abuses her, and from their mother, whose irresponsible behavior forces Gerald to work hard to keep the family together. As a teenager, Gerald finds success as a member of the Hazelwood Tigers basketball team, while Angel develops her talents as a dancer. Trouble still haunts them, however, and Gerald learns, painfully, that young friends can die and old enemies must be faced. In the end he must stand up to his stepfather alone in a blazing confrontation. Sharon M. Draper has interwoven characters and events from her previous novel, Tears of a Tiger, in this unflinchingly realistic portrayal of poverty and child abuse. It is an inspiring story of a young man who rises above the tragic circumstances of his life by drawing on the love and strength of family and friends.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass

by Meg Medina

One morning before school, some girl tells Piddy Sanchez that Yaqui Delgado hates her and wants to kick her ass. Piddy doesn't even know who Yaqui is, never mind what she's done to piss her off. Word is that Yaqui thinks Piddy is stuck-up, shakes her stuff when she walks, and isn't Latin enough with her white skin, good grades, and no accent. And Yaqui isn't kidding around, so Piddy better watch her back. At first Piddy is more concerned with trying to find out more about the father she's never met and how to balance honors courses with her weekend job at the neighborhood hair salon. But as the harassment escalates, avoiding Yaqui and her gang starts to take over Piddy's life. Is there any way for Piddy to survive without closing herself off or running away?

Winner of the Pura Belpre Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Africa Dream

by Eloise Greenfield and Carole Byard

An African-American child dreams of long-ago Africa, where she sees animals, shops in a marketplace, reads strange words from an old book, and returns to the village where her long-ago granddaddy welcomes her. Greenfield's lyrical telling and Byard's marvelous pictures make this book close to an ideal adventure for children, black or white. ' -Publishers Weekly.

1978 Coretta Scott King Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


The Rainbow People

by Laurence Yep

A collection of twenty Chinese folktales that were passed on by word of mouth for generations, as told by some old-timers newly settled in the United States.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Seventeen Black Artists

by Elton C. Fax

Views the artistic careers of Black men and women whose creations in such media as painting, sculpture, and photography reveal many aspects of the Black experience

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Under the Royal Palms

by Alma Flor Ada

The author recalls her life and impressions growing up in Cuba.

Winner of the Pura Belpre Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Christmas in the Big House, Christmas in the Quarters

by Patricia C. Mckissack and Fredrick L. Mckissack

Describes the customs, recipes, poems, and songs used to celebrate Christmas in the big plantation houses and in the slave quarters just before the Civil War.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


House of Purple Cedar

by Tim Tingle

"The hour has come to speak of troubled times. It is time we spoke of Skullyville." Thus begins the House of Purple Cedar, Rose Goode's telling of the year when she was eleven in Indian country, Oklahoma. The Indian schools boys and girls had been burned, stores too. By the time the railroad came, all of Skullyville had been burned.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Silver People

by Ms Margarita Engle

One hundred years ago, the world celebrated the opening of the Panama Canal, which connected the world's two largest oceans and signaled America's emergence as a global superpower. It was a miracle, this path of water where a mountain had stood--and creating a miracle is no easy thing. Thousands lost their lives, and those who survived worked under the harshest conditions for only a few silver coins a day. From the young "silver people" whose back-breaking labor built the Canal to the denizens of the endangered rainforest itself, this is the story of one of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, as only Newbery Honor-winning author Margarita Engle could tell it.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Shades of Black

by Sandra L. Pinkney

Poetic text celebrate the beauty and diversity of African American children.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Through My Eyes

by Margo Lundell and Ruby Bridges

On November 14, 1960, a tiny six-year-old black child, surrounded by federal marshals, walked through a mob of screaming segregationists and into her school. From where she sat in the office, Ruby Bridges could see parents marching through the halls and taking their children out of classrooms. The next day, Ruby walked through the angry mob once again and into a school where she saw no other students. The white children did not go to school that day, and they wouldn't go to school for many days to come. Surrounded by racial turmoil, Ruby, the only student in a classroom with one wonderful teacher, learned to read and add. This is the story of a pivotal event in history as Ruby Bridges saw it unfold around her. Ruby's poignant words, quotations from writers and from other adults who observed her, and dramatic photographs recreate an amazing story of innocence, courage, and forgiveness. Ruby Bridges' story is an inspiration to us all.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Beat the Story Drum, Pum-Pum

by Ashley Bryan

Five traditional Nigerian tales including "Hen and Frog," "Why Bush Cow and Elephant are Bad Friends," "The Husband Who Counted the Spoonfuls," "Why Frog and Snake Never Play Together," and "How Animals Got Their Tails."

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


My People

by Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes's spare yet eloquent tribute to his people has been cherished for generations. Langston Hughes (1902-1967) is one of America's most beloved and cherished chroniclers of the black experience. Best known for his work during the Harlem Renaissance, Hughes's work was consistently groundbreaking throughout his forty-six year career.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Star in the Forest

by Laura Resau

Zitlally's family is undocumented, and her father has just been arrested for speeding and deported back to Mexico. As her family waits for him to return—they’ve paid a coyote to guide him back across the border—they receive news that he and the coyote’s other charges have been kidnapped and are being held for ransom.

Meanwhile, Zitlally and a new friend find a dog in the forest near their trailer park. They name it Star for the star-shaped patch over its eye. As time goes on, Zitlally starts to realize that Star is her father’s “spirit animal,” and that as long as Star is safe, her father will be also. But what will happen to Zitlally’s dad when Star disappears?

Date Added: 05/25/2017


I Lost My Tooth in Africa

by Penda Diakité and Baba Wague Diakité

The story of a girl who loses her tooth while visiting family in Africa and the special surprise the African tooth fairy brings her.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Toning The Sweep

by Angela Johnson

Spanning three generations of African-American women, each holding on to a separate truth, this novel details the struggle these women face in finding a common ground upon which to share their love, friendship, and hardships.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


The Tequila Worm

by Viola Canales

Story of Sofia, growing up in the barrio, full of the magic and mystery of family traditions. When she is singled out to receive a scholarship to an elite boarding school, she longs to explore life beyond the barrio.

Winner of the Pura Belpre Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Heaven

by Angela Johnson

Marley has lived in heaven since she was two years old, when her mother found a postcard postmarked HEAVEN, OH, on a park bench and decided that was where she wanted to raise a family. And for twelve years, Marley's hometown has lived up to its name. She lives in a house by the river, has loving parents, a funny younger brother, good friends, and receives frequent letters from her mysterious uncle, Jack. Then one day a letter arrives from Alabama, and Marley's life is turned upsidedown. Marley doesn't even know who she is anymore--but where can she go for answers, when she's been deceived by the very people she should be able to trust the most?

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Green Is a Chile Pepper

by John Parra and Roseanne Thong

Green is a chile pepper, spicy and hot.Green is cilantro inside our pot.In this lively picture book, children discover a world of colors all around them: red is spices and swirling skirts, yellow is masa, tortillas, and sweet corn cake.

Many of the featured objects are Latino in origin, and all are universal in appeal.

With rich, boisterous illustrations, a fun-to-read rhyming text, and an informative glossary, this playful concept book will reinforce the colors found in every child's day!

Date Added: 05/25/2017



Showing 101 through 125 of 155 results