Special Collections

Young Reader's Choice Award Winners

Description: Bookshare is pleased to offer the following titles selected for the annual Pacific Northwest Library Association's Young Reader's Choice Award. #award #kids #teens


Showing 26 through 50 of 119 results
 
 

Ramona the Pest

by Beverly Cleary and Tracy Dockray

Ramona Quimby is excited to start kindergarten. No longer does she have to watch her older sister, Beezus, ride the bus to school with all the big kids. She's finally old enough to do it too!

Then she gets into trouble for pulling her classmate's boingy curls during recess. Even worse, her crush rejects her in front of everyone. Beezus says Ramona needs to quit being a pest, but how can she stop if she never was trying to be one in the first place?

Newbery Medal winning author Beverly Cleary expertly depicts the trials and triumphs of growing up through a relatable heroine in Ramona Quimby.

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Award

Fountas and Pinnell Level: O
Lexile: 691L - 770L
Reading Recovery: 34
DRA: 34
PM Readers: 24 Silver
Grade: 3
Ages: 8 - 9
Learning A to Z Level: S
Accelerated Reader (ATOS): 3.9 - 5.1

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1971

Award: Medal Winner

Frindle

by Andrew Clements

Is Nick Allen a troublemaker? He really just likes to liven things up at school -- and he's always had plenty of great ideas. When Nick learns some interesting information about how words are created, suddenly he's got the inspiration for his best plan ever...the frindle. Who says a pen has to be called a pen? Why not call it a frindle? Things begin innocently enough as Nick gets his friends to use the new word. Then other people in town start saying frindle. Soon the school is in an uproar, and Nick has become a local hero. His teacher wants Nick to put an end to all this nonsense, but the funny thing is frindle doesn't belong to Nick anymore. The new word is spreading across the country, and there's nothing Nick can do to stop it.

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Junior Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1999

Award: Youth

Artemis Fowl

by Eoin Colfer

Twelve-year-old Artemis Fowl is a millionaire, a genius-and, above all, a criminal mastermind. But even Artemis doesn't know what he's taken on when he kidnaps a fairy, Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon Unit. These aren't the fairies of bedtime stories; these fairies are armed and dangerous.

Artemis thinks he has them right where he wants them but then they stop playing by the rules.

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Intermediate Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2004

Award: Intermediate

The Supernaturalist

by Eoin Colfer

In the not-too-distant future, in a place called Satellite City, thirteen-year-old Cosmo Hill is unfortunate enough to come into the world unwanted by his parents. And so, as are all orphaned boys his age, Cosmo is dipped in a vaccine vat and sent to the Clarissa Frayne Institute for Parentally Challenged Boys-freight class. At Clarissa Frayne, the orphans, called "no-sponsors," are put to work by the state, testing dangerous products that never should be allowed near human beings. By the time the no-sponsors are sent to their cardboard utility pipes, given their nightly meal pack, and finally fall asleep, they are often covered in burns, bruises, or sores from the work of the day. Cosmo Hill knows that he must escape, even though he has no idea what might be waiting for him on the outside. He plans for the moment when he can make a break. When that moment finally comes, he nearly dies while escaping. But he is rescued by a gang of "Supernaturalists," a motley crew of kids who all have a special psychic ability-one that Cosmo is about to learn he has as well. They "see" supernatural Parasites-tiny, translucent creatures who feed on the life force of humans.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2007

Award: Intermediate

The Hunger Games

by Suzanne Collins

The book no one can stop talking about . . .

In the ruins of a place once known as North America lies the nation of Panem, a shining Capitol surrounded by twelve outlying districts. The Capitol is harsh and cruel and keeps the districts in line by forcing them all to send one boy and one girl between the ages of twelve and eighteen to participate in the annual Hunger Games, a fight to the death on live TV. Sixteen-year-old Katniss Everdeen, who lives alone with her mother and younger sister, regards it as a death sentence when she is forced to represent her district in the Games. But Katniss has been close to dead and survival, for her, is second nature. Without really meaning to, she becomes a contender. But if she is to win, she will have to start making choices that weigh survival against humanity and life against love.

New York Times bestselling author Suzanne Collins delivers equal parts suspense and philosophy, adventure and romance, in this searing novel set in a future with unsettling parallels to our present.

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Senior Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2011

Award: Senior

Hail, Hail Camp Timberwood

by Ellen Conford

Relates the experiences of 13-year-old Melanie as she tries to cope with the traumas and pleasures of her first year at summer camp.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1981

Award: Medal Winner

Driver's Ed

by Caroline B. Cooney

The universal experience for most high school students is learning to drive and getting their driver's license. Add breathlessly plotted romance and an accident and you have a poignant and realistic novel. Remy Martin prays to the God of Driver's Education that she will get to drive today. She doesn't know where she's going, but she knows one thing . . . she is going to get there fast. Morgan Campbell had been standing on the threshold of 16 and getting his driver's license ever since he could remember. But deep into the first crush of his life, thinking of nothing but girls, Morgan forgot what driving was all about. This poignant novel about responsibility and consequences is as convincing as it is irresistible.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1997

Award: Senior

The Face on the Milk Carton

by Caroline B. Cooney

No one ever really paid close attention to the faces of the missing children on the milk cartons. But as Janie Johnson glanced at the face of the ordinary little girl with her hair in tight pigtails, wearing a dress with a narrow white collar--a three-year-old who had been kidnapped twelve years before from a shopping mall in New Jersey--she felt overcome with shock. She recognized that little girl--it was she. How could it possibly be true? Janie can't believe that her loving parents kidnapped her, but as she begins to piece things together, nothing makes sense. Something is terribly wrong. Are Mr. and Mrs. Johnson really Janie's parents? And if not, who is Janie Johnson, and what really happened?

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Senior Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1993

Award: Senior

Golden Mare

by William Corbin

There are a great many horses in the high country of the West, and some of them are lucky enough to have a boy to look after them and love them. But there aren't nearly enough boys to go around. That is why Magic, the golden mare, was most particularly lucky to have a boy like Robin Daveen. It was the greatest kind of luck for both of them, as a matter of fact, that they had each other, because Magic was not an ordinary horse and Robin was not an ordinary boy.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1958

Award: Youth

Smoke

by William Corbin

Chris is a 14-year-old with a new stepfather on the farm. A wolf came and killed some chickens, and his stepfather wants to wants to the dog. Chris spends time alone on the mountain and befriends the wild dog, which turns out to be a wild and very ill German Shepherd. Chris learns many things about his stepfather and manhood. His much younger sister is a drama queen and quite funny, and his mother is too. Overall, a very serious topic, but compelling and full of wisdom. The ending is unexpected.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1970

Award: Youth

Bud, Not Buddy

by Christopher Paul Curtis

"It's funny how ideas are, in a lot of ways they're just like seeds. Both of them start real, real small and then... woop, zoop, sloop... before you can say Jack Robinson, they've gone and grown a lot bigger than you ever thought they could."

So figures scrappy 10-year-old philosopher Bud--"not Buddy"--Caldwell, an orphan on the run from abusive foster homes and Hoovervilles in 1930s Michigan. And the idea that's planted itself in his head is that Herman E. Calloway, standup-bass player for the Dusky Devastators of the Depression, is his father. Guided only by a flier for one of Calloway's shows--a small, blue poster that had mysteriously upset his mother shortly before she died--Bud sets off to track down his supposed dad, a man he's never laid eyes on. And, being 10, Bud-not-Buddy gets into all sorts of trouble along the way, barely escaping a monster-infested woodshed, stealing a vampire's car, and even getting tricked into "busting slob with a real live girl."

Christopher Paul Curtis, author of The Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963, once again exhibits his skill for capturing the language and feel of an era and creates an authentic, touching, often hilarious voice in little Bud.

Newbery Medal Winner and Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Junior Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2002

Award: Youth

Bud, Not Buddy

by Christopher Paul Curtis

It's 1936, in Flint, Michigan. Times may be hard, and ten-year-old Bud may be a motherless boy on the run, but Bud's got a few things going for him: he's got a suitcase filled with his own important, secret things; he's the author of Bud Caldwell's Rules and Things for Having a Funner Life and Marking a Better Liar Out of Yourself and, although his momma never told him who his father was, she left a clue: flyers of Herman E. Calloway and his famous band, the Dusky Devastators of the Depression! Bud's got an idea those flyers will lead him to his father, and nothing's gonna stop him.

Newbery Medal Winner and Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Junior Award

Date Added: 05/20/2019


Year: 2002

Award: Youth

The Midwife's Apprentice

by Karen Cushman

From the author of "Catherine, Called Birdy" comes another spellbinding novel set in medieval England.

The girl known only as Brat has no family, no home, and no future until she meets Jane the Midwife and becomes her apprentice. As she helps the sharp-tempered Jane deliver babies, Brat-who renames herself Alyce-gains knowledge, confidence, and the courage to want something from life: "A full belly, a contented heart, and a place in this world."

Medieval village life makes a lively backdrop for the funny, poignant story of how Alyce gets what she wants. A concluding note discusses midwifery past and present.

A Newbery Medal Winner.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1998

Award: Senior

Bunnicula

by James Howe and Deborah Howe and Alan Daniel

This book is written by Harold. His fulltime occupation is dog. He lives with Mr. and Mrs. Monroe and their sons Toby and Pete. Also sharing the home are a cat named Chester and a rabbit named Bunnicula. It is because of Bunnicula that Harold turned to writing. Someone had to tell the full story of what happened in the Monroe household after the rabbit arrived.Was Bunnicula really a vampire? Only Bunnicula knows for sure. But the story of Chester's suspicions and their consequences makes uproarious reading.Since its first appearance in 1979, Bunnicula has been a hit with kids and their parents everywhere, selling over 8 million copies and winning numerous awards.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1982

Award: Medal Winner

The Maze Runner

by James Dashner

When Thomas wakes up in the lift, the only thing he can remember is his first name. His memory is blank. But he's not alone. When the lift's doors open, Thomas finds himself surrounded by kids who welcome him to the Glade--a large, open expanse surrounded by stone walls. Just like Thomas, the Gladers don't know why or how they got to the Glade. All they know is that every morning the stone doors to the maze that surrounds them have opened. Every night they've closed tight. And every 30 days a new boy has been delivered in the lift. Thomas was expected. But the next day, a girl is sent up--the first girl to ever arrive in the Glade. And more surprising yet is the message she delivers. Thomas might be more important than he could ever guess. If only he could unlock the dark secrets buried within his mind.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2012

Award: Intermediate

Sex Education

by Jenny Davis

As a project for an unusually open class in sex education, Livvie and her boyfriend David learn to care for a pregnant young neighbor, and also about love and caring and eventually about pain and courage.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1991

Award: Senior

Sixth Grade Can Really Kill You

by Barthe Declements

Helen figures that she'll coast through sixth grade-until she comes face to face with her new teacher, Mrs. Lobb. Strict "Mrs. Blob" rules the class like a sergeant, and Helens' practical jokes make her crack down even more. It wouldn't be so bad if Helen got good grades-but the harder she works, the more she fails. Is Helen going to be stuck in sixth grade forever?

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1988

Award: Medal Winner

King of the Wind

by Marguerite Henry and Wesley Dennis

He was named “Sham” for the sun, this golden-red stallion born in the Sultan of Morocco’s stone stables. Upon his heel was a small white spot, the symbol of speed. But on his chest was the symbol of misfortune. Although he was swift as the desert winds, Sham’s pedigree would be scorned all his life by cruel masters and owners.

This is the classic story of Sham and his friend, the stable boy Agba. Their adventures take them from the sands of the Sahara to the royal courts of France, and finally to the green pastures and stately homes of England. For Sham was the renowned Godolphin Arabian, whose blood flows through the veins of almost every superior thoroughbred. Sham’s speed—like his story—has become legendary.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1951

Award: Medal Winner

Because of Winn-Dixie

by Kate DiCamillo

Recalling the fiction of Harper Lee and Carson McCullers, here is a funny, poignant, and utterly genuine first novel from a major new talent.

The summer Opal and her father, the preacher, move to Naomi, Florida, Opal goes into the Winn-Dixie supermarket--and comes out with a dog. A big, ugly, suffering dog with a sterling sense of humor. A dog she dubs Winn-Dixie. Because of Winn-Dixie, the preacher tells Opal ten things about her absent mother, one for each year Opal has been alive. Winn-Dixie is better at making friends than anyone Opal has ever known, and together they meet the local librarian, Miss Franny Block, who once fought off a bear with a copy of WAR AND PEACE. They meet Gloria Dump, who is nearly blind but sees with her heart, and Otis, an ex-con who sets the animals in his pet shop loose after hours, then lulls them with his guitar.Opal spends all that sweet summer collecting stories about her new friends and thinking about her mother. But because of Winn-Dixie or perhaps because she has grown, Opal learns to let go, just a little, and that friendship--and forgiveness--can sneak up on you like a sudden summer storm.

Newbery Medal Honor book

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2003

Award: Youth

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

by Kate DiCamillo

A timeless tale by the incomparable Kate DiCamillo honors the enduring power of love. "Someone will come for you, but first you must open your heart...." Once, in a house on Egypt Street, there lived a china rabbit named Edward Tulane. The rabbit was very pleased with himself, and for good reason: he was owned by a girl named Abilene, who treated him with the utmost care and adored him completely. And then, one day, he was lost. Kate DiCamillo takes us on an extraordinary journey, from the depths of the ocean to the net of a fisherman, from the top of a garbage heap to the fireside of a hoboes' camp, from the bedside of an ailing child to the bustling streets of Memphis. And along the way, we are shown a true miracle -- that even a heart of the most breakable kind can learn to love, to lose, and to love again.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2009

Award: Youth

The Tale of Despereaux

by Kate DiCamillo

Welcome to the story of Despereaux Tilling, a mouse who is in love with music, stories, and a princess named Pea. It is also the story of a rat called Roscuro, who lives in the darkness and covets a world filled with light. And it is the story of Miggery Sow, a slow-witted serving girl who harbors a simple, impossible wish. These three characters are about to embark on a journey that will lead them down into a horrible dungeon, up into a glittering castle, and, ultimately, into each other's lives. What happens then? As Kate DiCamillo would say: Reader, it is your destiny to find out. Winner of the 2000 Newbery award, and from the master storyteller who brought us Because of Winn-Dixie. This is another classic, a fairy tale full of quirky, unforgettable characters.

Winner of the 2000 Newbery award.

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Junior Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 2006

Award: Youth

Eva

by Peter Dickinson

Eva's hospital room looks out onto the skyscrapers of a huge city, but since waking up from her coma she only dreams of trees

Thirteen-year-old Eva opens her eyes to find herself in a hospital, her body paralyzed while it heals from a devastating accident. Her mother says that Eva will be able to move her hands and face soon and that everything is going to be fine, but something in her voice tells Eva it's not that simple. The doctors give Eva a keyboard that turns her typing into speech and controls a mirror that rotates to look around the room and out the window--every direction except back at her bed. What are the doctors trying to hide from her? And why, in an overpopulated world where humans have tamed all the wild places, does Eva keep dreaming of a forest she's never seen?

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Senior Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1992

Award: Senior

Eva

by Peter Dickinson

Eva's hospital room looks out onto the skyscrapers of a huge city, but since waking up from her coma she only dreams of trees

Thirteen-year-old Eva opens her eyes to find herself in a hospital, her body paralyzed while it heals from a devastating accident. Her mother says that Eva will be able to move her hands and face soon and that everything is going to be fine, but something in her voice tells Eva it's not that simple. The doctors give Eva a keyboard that turns her typing into speech and controls a mirror that rotates to look around the room and out the window--every direction except back at her bed. What are the doctors trying to hide from her? And why, in an overpopulated world where humans have tamed all the wild places, does Eva keep dreaming of a forest she's never seen?

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Senior Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1992

Award: Senior

Who Killed My Daughter? A True Story of a Mother's Search for Her Daughter's Murderer

by Lois Duncan

On July 16, 1989, Lois Duncan’s daughter was chased down and shot to death in Albuquerque, New Mexico. After the police abandoned all leads, Duncan refused to give up her search for the truth.

In this tragic memoir and investigation, Lois Duncan searches for clues to the murder of her youngest child, eighteen-year-old Kaitlyn Arquette. Duncan begins to suspect that the official police investigation of Kaitlyn’s murder is inadequate when detectives ignore her daughter’s accidental connection to organized crime in Albuquerque. When Duncan loses faith in the system, she reaches out to anyone that can help, including private investigators, journalists, and even a psychic. Written to inspire other families who have lost loved ones to unsolved crimes, Who Killed My Daughter? is a powerful testament to the tenacity of a mother’s love.

This ebook features an illustrated biography of Lois Duncan including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the author’s personal collection.

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1995

Award: Senior

The Black Stallion

by Walter Farley

First published in 1941, Walter Farley's best-selling novel for young readers is the triumphant tale of a boy and a wild horse. From Alec Ramsay and the Black's first meeting on an ill-fated ship to their adventures on a desert island and their eventual rescue, this beloved story will hold the rapt attention of readers new and old.

This book has been selected as a Common Core State Standards Text Exemplar (Grades 4-5, Stories) in Appendix B.

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1944

Award: Medal Winner


Showing 26 through 50 of 119 results