Special Collections

Disability Collection

Description: Bookshare is pleased to offer a collection focused on the topic of disability and accessibility. #disability


Showing 51 through 75 of 102 results
 

Crazy

by Pete Earley

From the Publisher: Pete Earley had no idea. He'd been a journalist for over thirty years, and the author of several award-winning-even bestselling-nonfiction books about crime and punishment and society. Yet he'd always been on the outside looking in. He had no idea what it was like to be on the inside looking out until his son, Mike, was declared mentally ill, and Earley was thrown headlong into the maze of contradictions, disparities, and catch-22s that is America's mental health system. The more Earley dug, the more he uncovered the bigger picture: Our nation's prisons have become our new mental hospitals. Crazy tells two stories. The first is his son's. The second describes what Earley learned during a yearlong investigation inside the Miami-Dade County jail, where he was given complete, unrestricted access. There, and in the surrounding community, he shadowed inmates and patients; interviewed correctional officers, public defenders, prosecutors, judges, mental-health professionals, and the police; talked with parents, siblings, and spouses; consulted historians, civil rights lawyers, and legislators. The result is both a remarkable piece of investigative journalism, and a wake-up call-a portrait that could serve as a snapshot of any community in America.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Mental Disabilities

Unto the Least of These

by Laverne Webber and Ellen Glanville and Andrew Wood

Describes how to develop a ministry for the mentally retarded. Includes teaching strategies, discipline information, and other useful information.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Mental Disabilities

Your Life is Not A Label

by Jerry Newport

This book describes Jerry's life and how he dealt with the challenges of Asperger syndrome. It also lets you, the reader know of things you should and shouldn't do, as well as Jerry's mistakes.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Mental Disabilities

A Special Kind Of Brain

by Nancy Russell Burger

Sharing the experience of bringing up a child with nonverbal learning disability (NLD), this warm and accessible book offers advice on subjects ranging across diagnosis and therapy, children's interaction with each other, suitable activities for a child with NLD and how to discuss NLD with children. An essential guide, this book will reassure, advise and inform parents and professionals who work with children with NLD.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

The Social Dimensions of Learning Disabilities

by Mavis Donahue and Bernice Y. L. Wong

Essays discussiing the social aspects of Learning Disabilities

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

Steps to Independence for People with Learning Disabilities

by Dale S. Brown

The booklet is designed to help learning disabled (LD) adults become economically independent and fulfill their potential. Introductory chapters define LD and specify such types of LD as auditory perceptual problems, catastrophic responses, directional problems, disinhibition, perceptual problems, and short term memory problems. Psychological effects of never being diagnosed are noted as well as potential dangers of being labeled. Suggestions for securing a professional diagnosis and for diagnosing one's self are given. Parents are encouraged to find practical solutions to family life problems and to teach independent living skills. Vocational aspects are examined, including searching for a job, choosing the right one, and being proud of one's job. Ideas are listed for analyzing strengths and weaknesses to overcome one's own handicap. The importance of social skills training is stressed. Practical coping strategies for dealing with perceptual problems (visual perception, dyslexia, and auditory perception) and central nervous system disorganization (directionality, hyperactivity, disinhibition, catastrophic response, and perseveration) are addressed. A final chapter lists sources of further information, professional help, and self help groups.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

One Word at a Time

by Linda G. Tessler

A unique and groundbreaking resource guide that is informative, insightful and inspiring, this book is Tessler's brave and honest account of her lifelong struggles with dyslexia. Culled from her experiences as a psychologist and scholar specializing in learning disabilities and as the parent of a son who struggles with dyslexia, she brings together sound psychological principles with personal knowledge.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

Turnabout Children

by Mary Maccracken

After receiving her masters degree in special education, the author decides to go into private practice as a learning-disabilities specialist. In this book, she tells of five of the children she worked with, and the techniques she used to help each child overcome his or her unique set of difficulties.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

College Students with Learning Disabilities

by Susan A. Vogel

This handbook answers such questions as: What is a learning disability? What technology might help a student with an LD? How can someone get through college with an LD? This book provides clear answers to questions which admissions officers often ask. It also includes several appendices listing resources which can help LD students do well in college and other higher education settings. Although teachers are not mentioned in the title, they may find this book to be a welcome resource, especially when mentoring highschool students.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

Looking Beyond Limitations

by Joan Kilbourne and Steve Köehmstedt

An investigation into the ways in which educational institutions disable students with learning disabilities.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

A Different Life

by Quinn Bradlee and Jeff Himmelman

Born with a hole in his heart that required invasive surgery when he was only three months old, Quinn Bradlee suffered from a battery of illnesses: seizures, migraines, fevers from an early age. But it wasn't until he was fourteen that Bradlee was correctly diagnosed with Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome (VCFS), a widespread, little-understood disorder that is expressed through a wide range of physical ailments and learning disabilities. Ten percent of the population is affected by a learning disability, but few of us understand what being learning disabled (LD) is really like. In this funny, moving, and often irreverent book, Bradlee tells his own inspirational story of growing up as an LD kid and of doing so as the child of larger-than-life, formidably accomplished parents: long-time Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee and bestselling author Sally Quinn. From his difficulties reading social cues, to his cringe-worthy loss of sexual innocence, Bradlee describes the challenges and joys of living "a different life" with disarming candor and humor. By the end of A Different Life he will have become, if not your best friend, one of your favorite people.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

IEP Guide

by Lawrence Siegel

Using plain language, Siegel, a special education attorney, explains assessments, goals and objectives, eligibility requirements, and other IEP issues in this resource for parents of children with learning disabilities. He walks through the entire IEP process, providing instructions, checklists, sample forms and letters, and numerous suggestions for specific actions to take. He gives advice on finding and understanding information on a child's rights, and tells how to prepare for IEP meetings and how to resolve disputes with the school district. Appendices list relevant laws and regulations, federal and state departments of education, and support and advocacy groups. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

Learning Outside the Lines

by David Cole and Jonathan Mooney

Every day, your school, your teachers, and even your peers draw lines to measure and standardize intelligence. They decide what criteria make one person smart and another person stupid. They decide who will succeed and who will just get by. Perhaps you find yourself outside the norm, because you learn differently -- but, unlike your classmates, you have no system in place that consistently supports your ability and desire to learn. Simply put, you are considered lazy and stupid. You are expected to fail. Learning Outside the Lines is written by two such "academic failures" -- that is, two academic failures who graduated from Brown University at the top of their class. Jonathan Mooney and David Cole teach you how to take control of your education and find true success -- and they offer all the reasons why you should persevere.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

What Do You Mean I Have a Learning Disability?

by Kathleen M. Dwyer

Ten-year-old Jimmy just accepts the fact that other kids can do things better than he can. It's always been that way--but now Jimmy is starting to think there must be a reason. One day he whispers to his cat, "I'm so stupid. I know I am." This true story has a happy ending. One of Jimmy's teachers encouraged his parents to have Jimmy tested, and it turned out that he had a learning disability. Hard work and perseverance, and the support of his family, helped Jimmy overcome his disability. For children who are learning disabled, and for their families and friends, this inspiring book offers encouragement and support in a shared effort.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities

by Bob Algozzine and James E. Ysseldyke

The characteristics associated with LD, and practical teaching strategies proven to increase the success rate of students both inside and outside the classroom.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

The War Come Home

by Deborah Cohen

"This impressive book offers a powerful set of insights into the lasting effects of the First World War and the different ways in which belligerent states came to terms with the war's consequences."

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: History of Disabilities

The New Disability History

by Paul K. Longmore and Lauri Umansky

In a series of scholarly but highly readable essays, this book opens discussion on the role of disabled people in American history. It also examines how history has been affected by perceptions of disability. For example, one article looks at the ways disability has been used to strengthen prejudice against particular ethnic groups and to justify discrimination - "experts" have often claimed that one or another group of immigrants is genetically inferior and prone to mental retardation or physical frailty. One essay is based on the Civil War letters of a deaf man to his family. Another looks at the ways Helen Keller's Socialist beliefs were stifled by those around her.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: History of Disabilities

Everyone Here Spoke Sign Language

by Nora E. Groce

From the seventeenth century to the early years of the twentieth, the population of Martha's Vineyard manifested an extremely high rate of profound hereditary deafness.

In stark contrast to the experience of most deaf people in our own society, the Vineyarders who were born deaf were so thoroughly integrated into the daily life of the community that they were not seen-- and did not see themselves-- as handicapped or as a group apart. Deaf people were included in all aspects of life, such as town politics, jobs, church affairs, and social life.

How was this possible? On the Vineyard, hearing and deaf islanders alike grew up speaking sign language. This unique sociolinguistic adaptation meant that the usual barriers to communication between the hearing and the deaf, which so isolate many deaf people today, did not exist.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: History of Disabilities

Signs of Resistance

by Paul K. Longmore and Lauri Umansky and Susan Burch

During the early nineteenth century, American schools for deaf education regarded sign language as the "natural language" of deaf people, using it as the principal mode of instruction and communication. These schools inadvertently became the seedbeds of an emerging Deaf community and culture. But by mid-century, an oralist movement developed that sought to suppress sign language, removing Deaf teachers and requiring deaf people to learn speech and lip reading. Historians have all assumed that in the early decades of the twentieth century oralism triumphed overwhelmingly.

Susan Burch shows us that everyone has it wrong; Deaf students, teachers, and staff consistently and creatively subverted oralist policies and goals within the schools. Ultimately, the efforts to assimilate Deaf people resulted in fortifying their ties to a separate Deaf cultural community.

In Signs of Resistance, Susan Burch persuasively reinterprets early twentieth century Deaf history. Using community sources such as Deaf newspapers, memoirs, films, and oral (sign language) interviews, Burch shows how the Deaf community mobilized to defend sign language, increased its political activism, and clarified its cultural values. In the process, a collective Deaf consciousness, identity, and political organization were formed.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: History of Disabilities

A Brief History of Dog Guides for the Blind

by Nelson Coon

This small book originally an article written by the reference librarian at the Blindiana Library at Perkins School for the Blind highlights the varied and long history of dog guides for blind people. From Pompae, to Japan, from the 15th centure to biblical times the author depicts and writes about dogs guiding blind people. Illustrated with descriptive paintings and texts from various books, this book is a treasure for anyone who loves dogs, and or history.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: History of Disabilities

Woeful Afflictions

by Mary Klages

From Tiny Tim to Helen Keller, disabled people in the nineteenth century were portrayed in sentimental terms, as afflicted beings whose sufferings afforded able-bodied people opportunities to practice empathy and compassion. In all kinds of representations of disability, from popular fiction to the reports of institutions established for the education and rehabilitation of disabled people, the equation of disability and sentimentality served a variety of social functions, from ensuring the continued existence of a sympathetic sensibility in a hard-hearted, market-driven world, to asserting the selfhood and equality of disabled adults. Unique in its focus on blindness and its examination of the interplay between institutional discourse and popular literature, Woeful Afflictions offers a detailed historical analysis of the types of cultural work performed by sentimental representations of disability in public reports and lectures, exhibitions, novels, stories, poems, autobiographical writings, and popular media portrayals from the 1830s through the 1890s in the United States. Woeful Afflictions combines contemporary scholarship on sentimentalism with the most recent works on the cultural meanings of disability to argue that sentimentalism, with its emphasis on creating emotional identifications between texts and readers, both reinforces existing associations between disability and otherness and works to rewrite those associations in portraying disabled people, in their emotional capacities, as no different from the able-bodied. This book will interest anyone concerned with disability studies and the social construction of the body, with the history of education and of public institutional care in the United States, and with autobiographical writings.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: History of Disabilities

Louis Braille

by Margaret Davidson and Compere

A poignant story of the man who developed the Braille system of printing for the blind.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: History of Disabilities

Disability Visibility

by Alice Wong

One in five people in the United States lives with a disability. Some disabilities are visible, others less apparent—but all are underrepresented in media and popular culture. Now, just in time for the thirtieth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, activist Alice Wong brings together this urgent, galvanizing collection of contemporary essays by disabled people.

From Harriet McBryde Johnson’s account of her debate with Peter Singer over her own personhood to original pieces by authors like Keah Brown and Haben Girma; from blog posts, manifestos, and eulogies to Congressional testimonies, and beyond: this anthology gives a glimpse into the rich complexity of the disabled experience, highlighting the passions, talents, and everyday lives of this community. It invites readers to question their own understandings. It celebrates and documents disability culture in the now. It looks to the future and the past with hope and love.

Date Added: 06/30/2020


Category: General

About Us

by Rosemarie Garland-Thomson and Peter Catapano

Based on the pioneering New York Times series, About Us collects the personal essays and reflections that have transformed the national conversation around disability.

Boldly claiming a space in which people with disabilities can be seen and heard as they are—not as others perceive them—About Us captures the voices of a community that has for too long been stereotyped and misrepresented. Speaking not only to those with disabilities, but also to their families, coworkers and support networks, the authors in About Us offer intimate stories of how they navigate a world not built for them. Since its 2016 debut, the popular New York Times’ “Disability” column has transformed the national dialogue around disability. Now, echoing the refrain of the disability rights movement, “Nothing about us without us,” this landmark collection gathers the most powerful essays from the series that speak to the fullness of human experience—stories about first romance, childhood shame and isolation, segregation, professional ambition, child-bearing and parenting, aging and beyond.

Reflecting on the fraught conversations around disability—from the friend who says “I don’t think of you as disabled,” to the father who scolds his child with attention differences, “Stop it stop it stop it what is wrong with you?”—the stories here reveal the range of responses, and the variety of consequences, to being labeled as “disabled” by the broader public.

Here, a writer recounts her path through medical school as a wheelchair user—forging a unique bridge between patients with disabilities and their physicians. An acclaimed artist with spina bifida discusses her art practice as one that invites us to “stretch ourselves toward a world where all bodies are exquisite.” With these notes of triumph, these stories also offer honest portrayals of frustration over access to medical care, the burden of social stigma and the nearly constant need to self-advocate in the public realm.

In its final sections, About Us turns to the questions of love, family and joy to show how it is possible to revel in life as a person with disabilities. Subverting the pervasive belief that disability results in relentless suffering and isolation, a quadriplegic writer reveals how she rediscovered intimacy without touch, and a mother with a chronic illness shares what her condition has taught her young children. With a foreword by Andrew Solomon and introductory comments by co-editors Peter Catapano and Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, About Us is a landmark publication of the disability movement for readers of all backgrounds, forms and abilities.

Topics Include: Becoming Disabled • Mental Illness is not a Horror Show • Disability and the Right to Choose • Brain Injury and the Civil Right We Don’t Think • The Deaf Body in Public Space • The Everyday Anxiety of the Stutterer • I Use a Wheelchair. And Yes, I’m Your Doctor • A Symbol for “Nobody” That’s Really for Everybody • Flying While Blind • My $1,000 Anxiety Attack • A Girlfriend of My Own • The Three-Legged Dog Who Carried Me • Passing My Disability On to My Children • I Have Diabetes. Am I to Blame? • Learning to Sing Again • A Disabled Life is a Life Worth Living

Date Added: 09/03/2019


Category: General

Madness, Disability and Social Exclusion

by Jane Hubert

A unique work that brings together a broad range of specialist disciplines to create a new perspective on social and physical exclusion from society. Brings a much needed comparative approach to the subject of disability. Confinement, hermaphrodites, killing of disabled children, leprosy, deafness, and funerary rituals are explored.

Date Added: 03/08/2018


Category: General


Showing 51 through 75 of 102 results