Special Collections

Disability Collection

Description: Bookshare is pleased to offer a collection focused on the topic of disability and accessibility. #disability


Showing 76 through 100 of 102 results
 

The Hidden Child

by Sherry Bonnice

Autism presents unique challenges to the families and friends of young people with this condition. Some children with autism seem to be individuals of great contradiction--unable to perform well in one educational area, while having near-genius abilities in other areas. Children with autism may act withdrawn, unresponsive, or unemotional. They may at times seem impossible to understand. Challenges like these lead to many misunderstandings about autism and the abilities of children with this condition. In The Hidden Child: Youth with Autism, you will read the story of Livie and her brother Tucker, who has autism. As Livie and her parents experience the challenges that raising Tucker brings, the reader experiences the turmoil and strength needed to face the emotional roller coaster that autism can cause. As you read, you will not only learn about Livie's and Tucker's experiences. You will also learn facts about autism, what the symptoms of autism are, and where to turn for further information or help with issues related to autism. This book will also teach you about the different educational treatments that are available to help each unique child. Through early intervention, education, and further research, individuals with autism can lead more fulfilling lives.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Unseen Childhoods

by Helen A. Aveling

The nine essays in this collection break the 20th century into three periods - early, middle, and late. They cover the themes of stereotypes, role models, and inclusion and segregation, tracing their evolution across nearly a hundred years. Among the essays are "Modeling Illness in the Early 20th Century" by Helen A. Aveling; "A Choice of Virtues," by Deborah Kent; and "My Sibling the Other," by Rebecca R. Butler.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Finding My Voice

by Joyce Libal

Speech impairment is a common challenge among youth. Unfortunately, it is a challenge that, despite its frequency, can cause severe emotional and social distress for those who experience it. Stigma and prejudice can present particularly difficult emotional trials and social roadblocks to youth with speech impairments. All too often, these young people are assumed to be less capable, immature, or even unintelligent because of their communication barriers.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Guaranteed Rights

by Joan Esherick

From the Book jacket: A local modeling program denies thirteen-year-old Maria the chance to participate in its workshops. The reason? She uses a wheelchair. What should she do? The state of Alabama nearly pulls the plug on a disabled college student's medical support. Why? He was approaching his twenty-first birthday. Are there other avenues this teen can pursue? Employers reject nineteen-year-old Manuel's job application because he has a history of seizures, even though his seizures are completely controlled by medication and his last episode was more than five years ago. Can Manuel appeal? These cases reflect real teens in real circumstances. And all three represent how special needs legislation impacts youth with special needs. Youth with special needs want the chance to reach their potentials, despite the challenges they must overcome. Some face physical or medical challenges. Others have psychological or emotional disorders. Still others live in at-risk circumstances beyond their control. Some may even be in jail. American law affords all these young people certain rights and protections, regardless of their special needs. What are these rights? Where do they come from? Whom do they protect? Guaranteed Rights: The Legislation That Protects Youth with Special Needs will answer these and other questions. It examines the history, passage, and enforcement of special needs law as it relates to appropriate education, appropriate medical care, and equal access to jobs, public places, and services for all youth with special needs.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Accommodations--or Just Good Teaching?

by Bonnie M. Hodge and Jennie Preston-Sabin

This is an excellent book for college professors, college students with disabilities, or people working with disabled college students. it explains the different accommendations available for these students, and what exactly the law covers. Definitely worth reading if you are a student planning to go to college and who have a disability.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

My Name is Not Slow

by Autumn Libal

From the Book Jacket: When Mr. Brown peers through the glass window at his new daughter, she looks impossibly frail in the incubator. The doctors said shehas Down syndrome; she will have mental retardation. But what will that mean for Mr. Brown's daughter? What will she be able to do? Will she ever have talents like his other children? Will she feel joy from her accomplishments-or only pain from her limitations? Mental retardation is one of the most stigmatized disabilities in our society. People living with mental retardation are often treated as if they are simple, emotionless, child-like, or even less than human. And yet, individuals living with mental retardation have hopes and dreams, likes and dislikes, and talents and weaknesses just like anybody else. This book will help you learn about mental retardation, the special needs of individuals living with this form of disability, and the support systems available to help people with mental retardation acquire independence and success. As you read, you will meet Penelope Brown, one girl living with Down syndrome. Follow her story as she struggles both with her medical condition and with the ignorance of others. As you read, you will learn how Penelope and her family experience hope, disappointment, love, loss, and happiness as they learn what it means to live with mental retardation.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Deaf Child Crossing

by Marlee Matlin

Megan is excited when Cindy moves into her neighborhood -- maybe she'll finally have a best friend. Sure enough, the two girls quickly become inseparable. Cindy even starts to learn sign language so they can communicate more easily.

But when they go away to summer camp together, problems arise. Cindy feels left out, because Megan is spending all of her time with Lizzie, another deaf girl; Megan resents that Cindy is always trying to help her, even when she doesn't need help. Before they can mend their differences, both girls have to learn what it means to be a friend.

A sensitive depiction of childhood friendship with its fragility, jealousies, and joys" - Booklist

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

I Have A Sister -- My Sister Is Deaf

by Jeanne Whitehouse Peterson

A young deaf child who loves to run and jump and play is affectionately described by her older sister.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Helen Keller

by Katharine E. Wilkie

Focusing on her childhood years, this biography is about Helen Keller who overcame her handicaps with the help of her teacher Anne Sullivan.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Chained

by Autumn Libal

From the Book jacket: The warm sun sliced through the window and melted across Kayla's bed. Slowly and reluctantly, Kayla rolled onto her side. Heavy with exhaustion and pain, she inched across the warm sheets. She felt as if someone had poured liquid metal into her body during the night-metal that had settled dense and cold in her bones. Gripping the bedpost with a white-knuckled hand, Kayla sucked in her breath. She closed her eyes, pulled herself up, and began the long journey to the bathroom. Inching along with shuffling feet and hunched back, Kayla looked much older than her fifteen years. She teetered dangerously, one hand outstretched for balance, one shoulder sliding along the wall for support. By the time she got to the bathroom door, she was already exhausted. What would it be like if you woke up every morning feeling sick? How would you get through each day if every minute brought you pain? What would you do if you had an illness that kept returning over and over again, refusing to be cured? Growing up is a challenge for everyone, but youth with chronic illnesses have additional challenges and special needs. These young people struggle to balance their physical conditions with the demands of school, friends, and activities. Living with chronic illness makes many young people feel alienated from their peers and may lead them to question their futures. In Chained: Youth with Chronic Illness, you will learn about the many challenges youth with chronic illness face and the support systems available to help them. Along the way, you will learn more about Kayla and her journey to live and thrive in the face of chronic illness.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Teaching Students with Special Needs

by Tom E. C. Smith and Edward A. Polloway and James R. Patton and Carol A. Dowdy

the one thing that will remain constant is the commitment to provide all students, regardless of their abilities or disabilities, with an equal opportunity to receive an appropriate education.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Classroom Success for the Learning Disabled

by Suzanne H. Stevens

From The Book Jacket "Stevens has done it again! Her newest book on learning disabilities is lucid, accurate, insightful, practical, and it makes superb reading.... Her book provides the most helpful information I have seen for regular classroom teachers who are concerned with the realities and the nitty-gritties of helping LD children. My only regret is that the book has not been available for the last 20 years." DR. BARBARA BATEMAN University of Oregon "Stevens' book should be on the desk of every elementary and middle school teacher in every English-speaking country of the world. Stevens must have been an excellent classroom teacher, for she obviously understands both good elementary education and the learning-disabled child. Her book will go far to assist learning-disabled children toward a greater realization of their potentials." WILLIAM M. CRUICKSHANK, Ph.D. University of Michigan Between ten and twelve percent of the children in the U.S. are learning disabled. With such a large proportion of the population affected, the problem is not simply the concern of parents, LD individuals, and their teachers. It is the concern of society as a whole. In Classroom Success for the Learning Disabled, Suzanne Stevens discusses ways that we can help these children succeed in school and grow into productive adults. She offers practical suggestions on: • Recognizing the LD child • Adjusting teaching techniques • Adapting texts and other materials • Using LD specialists and psychologists effectively • Adjusting classroom management procedures • Testing and grading fairly • Mainstreaming the LD child Stevens, a learning disabilities expert and a former classroom teacher, is the author of The Learning-Disabled Child: Ways That Parents Can Help. JOHN F. BLAIR, Publisher • 1406 Plaza Drive • Winston Salem, NC 27103 ISBN 0-89587-035-5 $8.95

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Special Needs Trusts

by Stephen Elias

If you care for a child or other loved one with a disability, you've no doubt thought about what will happen when you're no longer able to give that care. Fortunately, there's a simple solution to this dilemma -- create a "special needs trust." Special Needs Trusts shows you how to leave any amount of money to your disabled loved one, without jeopardizing government benefits. It provides plain-English information and forms that let you create a special needs trust by modifying your will or living trust document.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

The Child With Special Needs

by Stanley I. Greenspan and Serena Wieder

This book describes various challenges that some children with special needs might face. The author goes into great detail about the floor time treatment method as well as describing the impact having a child with special needs has on the family.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Collaborative Assessment

by Stephen A. Goodman and Stuart H. Wittenstein

This comprehensive text published by AFB in 2003 is the first to present assessment in a way that can be understood by professionals and families alike.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Freak the Mighty

by Rodman Philbrick

Two boys - a slow learner stuck in the body of a teenage giant and a tiny Einstein in leg braces - forge a unique friendship when they pair up to create one formidable human force. (Made into the film, The Mighty. )

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Seeing Beyond Sight

by Tony Deifell

For five years Tony Deifell taught teenagers to take photographs. His students were blind. Unusual as the idea may seem at first, putting cameras in the hands of visually impaired children proved to be extremely fruitful both for the photographers, who found an astonishing new means of self-expression, and for the viewers of their images, for whom this is an entirely new kind of dreamlike and intuitive creation. Even before you know that these pictures were taken by blind teenagers, they are striking in their use of light and composition, and haunting in their chiaroscuro intensity. To learn more, visit http://www.seeingbeyondsight.org/

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Visual Impairments: Culture and the Arts

Another Eyesight

by Julia Ionides and Peter Howell

This book provides an overview and some in-depth information about the many ways of creating multi-sensory access for blind and partially sighted people to art, nature and historical sites.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Visual Impairments: Culture and the Arts

Living with Vision Problems

by Jill Sardegna and Susan Shelly and Allan Rutzen and Scott M. Steidl

Millions of Americans have a significant level of vision impairment. This revised edition of Living with Vision Problems is designed to provide students with helpful information such as: how to cope, causes and types of vision impairments, preventions, treatments and even LASIK procedures. It is an extensive sourcebook for all topics, including medical, concerning blindness.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Visual Impairments: Culture and the Arts

Arts, Culture, and Blindness

by Simon Hayhoe

This book explores one of the most powerful myths in modern society: the myth that blind people are incapable of understanding and creating visual arts.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Visual Impairments: Culture and the Arts

Moving over the Edge

by Pamela K. Walker

A book about the author's coming of age alongside disability activists and artists with disabilities, reflecting the sociological evolution from disability rights to disability culture. It features many of the artists and groups that emerged in the San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1980s, including Axis Dance Company, Bruce Curtis, CJ Jones, David Roche, Cheryl Marie Wade and Wry Crips Disabled Women's Theater.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Visual Impairments: Culture and the Arts

What I Learned in America

by Jalil Mortazavi

AMERICA, THE LAND OF OPPORTUNITY EVEN FOR A BLIND JOURNALIST FROM IRAN Throughout the world, millions of people believe if you are blind that this prevents you from traveling too far from home. Others, of course, may have these same beliefs but have just kept them to themselves. Thus begins Jalil Mortazavi's engaging and baffling experience as he tries to overcome such odd thinking. In his book, he tries to cover much of what he has learned in the hope that it will inspire, delight, and amuse his audience. Mortazavi is an Iranian-American journalist who lives in Brookline, Massachusetts. He works for the Persian-American Media Watch. He has also been associated with Persian Voice of Boston, 24-Hour Persian Radio based in California, and 24-Hour Persian TV [NI TV]. He has appeared on Imus in the Morning, and he has done some news commentary on National Public Radio's All Things Considered and on Talk of the Nation. In addition, Jalil enjoyed being a guest on a number of different television and radio talk shows WCV TV, American Radio Network in Baltimore, and radio stations WBZ, WHDH, WRKO, WROR, and WTTP. Mortazavi has also written for such publications as The Boston Globe, The Boston Herald, and The Brockton Enterprise.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Visual Impairments: Culture and the Arts

A Brush With Darkness

by Lisa Fittipaldi

When Lisa Fittipaldi went blind at the age of forty-seven, she descended into a freefall of anger and denial that lasted for two years. In this moving memoir, she paints a vivid picture of the perceptual and emotional darkness that accompanied her vision loss, and her arduous journey back into the sighted world through mastery of the principles of art and color.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Visual Impairments: Culture and the Arts

Why I Burned My Book And Other Essays On Disability

by Paul K. Longmore

This wide-ranging book shows why Paul Longmore is one of the most respected figures in disability studies today. Understanding disability as a major variety of human experience, he urges us to establish it as a category of social, political, and historical analysis in much the same way that race, gender, and class already have been. The essays here search for the often hidden pattern of systemic prejudice and probe into the institutionalized discrimination that affects the one in five Americans with disabilities.

Whether writing about the social critic Randolph Bourne, contemporary political activists, or media representations of people with disabilities, Longmore demonstrates that the search for heroes is a key part of the continuing struggle of disabled people to gain a voice and to shape their destinies. His essays on bioethics and public policy examine the conflict of agendas between disability rights activists and non-disabled policy makers, healthcare professionals, euthanasia advocates, and corporate medical bureaucracies.

The title essay, which concludes the book, demonstrates the necessity of activism for any disabled person who wants access to the American dream.

Author note: Paul K. Longmore is Professor of History at San Francisco State University. He is the author of The Invention of George Washington and the co-editor (with Lauri Umansky) of The New Disability History: American Perspectives.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Visual Impairments: Culture and the Arts

An Enemy of the People

by Henrik Ibsen and Arthur Miller

When Dr. Stockmann discovers that the water in the small Norwegian town in which he is the resident physician has been contaminated, he does what any responsible citizen would do: reports it to the authorities.

But Stockmann's good deed has the potential to ruin the town's reputation as a popular spa destination, and instead of being hailed as a hero, Stockmann is labeled an enemy of the people.

Arthur Miller's adaptation of Henrik Ibsen's classic drama is a classic in itself, a penetrating exploration of what happens when the truth comes up against the will of the majority. This edition includes Arthur Miller's preface and an introduction by John Guare.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Visual Impairments: Culture and the Arts


Showing 76 through 100 of 102 results