Special Collections

Disability Collection

Description: Bookshare is pleased to offer a collection focused on the topic of disability and accessibility. #disability


Showing 1 through 25 of 102 results
 

Hearts of Wisdom

by Emily K. Abel

Drawing upon a wealth of diaries, letters, and case records from hospitals and social service agencies, the author examines the shifting roles of caregivers between 1850 and 1940. In addition to the diaries and letters of literate white woman, she turns to slave narratives from the antebellum south and records from health-care agencies serving American Indians during the first part of the 20th century. Abel shows that women in the 19th century gained self-esteem and status through their knowledge of home remedies and nursing techniques. The medical profession gained strength with the discovery of microbes and the development of medications to treat specific diseases. During the 20th century professionals discredited women who provided health care at home. One chapter discusses mothers of children with epilepsy or mental retardation, who were pressured to place their children in institutions and to sever emotional ties with them. Another chapter explores the shift from American sign language to oralism in the education of deaf children, and the impact this had upon mothers. Abel concludes by looking briefly at the current trend to return more and more caregiving to the home.

Date Added: 03/08/2018


Category: General

Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities

by Bob Algozzine and James E. Ysseldyke

The characteristics associated with LD, and practical teaching strategies proven to increase the success rate of students both inside and outside the classroom.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

The Accessible Museum Model Programs of Accessibility for Disabled and Older People

by American Association of Museums

A very interesting guide to museums of all kinds, which cater to accessibility for disabled and older people.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Physical Disabilities

Unseen Childhoods

by Helen A. Aveling

The nine essays in this collection break the 20th century into three periods - early, middle, and late. They cover the themes of stereotypes, role models, and inclusion and segregation, tracing their evolution across nearly a hundred years. Among the essays are "Modeling Illness in the Early 20th Century" by Helen A. Aveling; "A Choice of Virtues," by Deborah Kent; and "My Sibling the Other," by Rebecca R. Butler.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

Hands-On Parenting

by Debbie Bacon

Chapters include topics such as: newborns and the basics, communicating with your child, organizing and children's clothing, toilet training, traveling with your children, social issues for blind parents, and toys and game suggestions for families.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Parents and Disabilities

Job-Hunting for the So-Called Handicapped (Second Edition)

by Richard Nelson Bolles and Dale S. Brown

Richard Bolles' What Color is your Parachute? has helped millions of readers find their path in life, and now his creative approach to job-hunting is brought to bear on the specific challenges faced by job hunters with disabilities. In Job-Hunting for the So-Called HandicappedM/i>, Bolles and Dale Susan Brown guide readers through the often-frustrating, but ultimately rewarding process of securing independence in their lives and personal satisfaction in their careers. The authors begin by demystifying the intricacies of the ADA, describing in clear terms what the act does and does not guarantee disabled job hunters, and then move on to job-hunting strategies tailored specifically to people with disabilities.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: General

The Hidden Child

by Sherry Bonnice

Autism presents unique challenges to the families and friends of young people with this condition. Some children with autism seem to be individuals of great contradiction--unable to perform well in one educational area, while having near-genius abilities in other areas. Children with autism may act withdrawn, unresponsive, or unemotional. They may at times seem impossible to understand. Challenges like these lead to many misunderstandings about autism and the abilities of children with this condition. In The Hidden Child: Youth with Autism, you will read the story of Livie and her brother Tucker, who has autism. As Livie and her parents experience the challenges that raising Tucker brings, the reader experiences the turmoil and strength needed to face the emotional roller coaster that autism can cause. As you read, you will not only learn about Livie's and Tucker's experiences. You will also learn facts about autism, what the symptoms of autism are, and where to turn for further information or help with issues related to autism. This book will also teach you about the different educational treatments that are available to help each unique child. Through early intervention, education, and further research, individuals with autism can lead more fulfilling lives.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Teens, Children and Disabilities

A Different Life

by Quinn Bradlee and Jeff Himmelman

Born with a hole in his heart that required invasive surgery when he was only three months old, Quinn Bradlee suffered from a battery of illnesses: seizures, migraines, fevers from an early age. But it wasn't until he was fourteen that Bradlee was correctly diagnosed with Velo-Cardio-Facial Syndrome (VCFS), a widespread, little-understood disorder that is expressed through a wide range of physical ailments and learning disabilities. Ten percent of the population is affected by a learning disability, but few of us understand what being learning disabled (LD) is really like. In this funny, moving, and often irreverent book, Bradlee tells his own inspirational story of growing up as an LD kid and of doing so as the child of larger-than-life, formidably accomplished parents: long-time Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee and bestselling author Sally Quinn. From his difficulties reading social cues, to his cringe-worthy loss of sexual innocence, Bradlee describes the challenges and joys of living "a different life" with disarming candor and humor. By the end of A Different Life he will have become, if not your best friend, one of your favorite people.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

Steps to Independence for People with Learning Disabilities

by Dale S. Brown

The booklet is designed to help learning disabled (LD) adults become economically independent and fulfill their potential. Introductory chapters define LD and specify such types of LD as auditory perceptual problems, catastrophic responses, directional problems, disinhibition, perceptual problems, and short term memory problems. Psychological effects of never being diagnosed are noted as well as potential dangers of being labeled. Suggestions for securing a professional diagnosis and for diagnosing one's self are given. Parents are encouraged to find practical solutions to family life problems and to teach independent living skills. Vocational aspects are examined, including searching for a job, choosing the right one, and being proud of one's job. Ideas are listed for analyzing strengths and weaknesses to overcome one's own handicap. The importance of social skills training is stressed. Practical coping strategies for dealing with perceptual problems (visual perception, dyslexia, and auditory perception) and central nervous system disorganization (directionality, hyperactivity, disinhibition, catastrophic response, and perseveration) are addressed. A final chapter lists sources of further information, professional help, and self help groups.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

The Disabled Disciple

by Elizabeth J. Browne

Elizabeth Browne, a doctor of theology explores how the bible represents people with disabilities and how the church represents people with disabilities. Good book for ministers, or just people interested in Christianity who are blind or disabled.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Physical Disabilities

Lend Me Your Ear

by Brenda Jo Brueggemann

Explores, from the perspective of a rhetorician who is herself deaf, the social, cultural and educational impacts of deafness, both inside and outside of deaf culture.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Signs of Resistance

by Paul K. Longmore and Lauri Umansky and Susan Burch

During the early nineteenth century, American schools for deaf education regarded sign language as the "natural language" of deaf people, using it as the principal mode of instruction and communication. These schools inadvertently became the seedbeds of an emerging Deaf community and culture. But by mid-century, an oralist movement developed that sought to suppress sign language, removing Deaf teachers and requiring deaf people to learn speech and lip reading. Historians have all assumed that in the early decades of the twentieth century oralism triumphed overwhelmingly.

Susan Burch shows us that everyone has it wrong; Deaf students, teachers, and staff consistently and creatively subverted oralist policies and goals within the schools. Ultimately, the efforts to assimilate Deaf people resulted in fortifying their ties to a separate Deaf cultural community.

In Signs of Resistance, Susan Burch persuasively reinterprets early twentieth century Deaf history. Using community sources such as Deaf newspapers, memoirs, films, and oral (sign language) interviews, Burch shows how the Deaf community mobilized to defend sign language, increased its political activism, and clarified its cultural values. In the process, a collective Deaf consciousness, identity, and political organization were formed.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: History of Disabilities

A Special Kind Of Brain

by Nancy Russell Burger

Sharing the experience of bringing up a child with nonverbal learning disability (NLD), this warm and accessible book offers advice on subjects ranging across diagnosis and therapy, children's interaction with each other, suitable activities for a child with NLD and how to discuss NLD with children. An essential guide, this book will reassure, advise and inform parents and professionals who work with children with NLD.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

About Us

by Rosemarie Garland-Thomson and Peter Catapano

Based on the pioneering New York Times series, About Us collects the personal essays and reflections that have transformed the national conversation around disability.

Boldly claiming a space in which people with disabilities can be seen and heard as they are—not as others perceive them—About Us captures the voices of a community that has for too long been stereotyped and misrepresented. Speaking not only to those with disabilities, but also to their families, coworkers and support networks, the authors in About Us offer intimate stories of how they navigate a world not built for them. Since its 2016 debut, the popular New York Times’ “Disability” column has transformed the national dialogue around disability. Now, echoing the refrain of the disability rights movement, “Nothing about us without us,” this landmark collection gathers the most powerful essays from the series that speak to the fullness of human experience—stories about first romance, childhood shame and isolation, segregation, professional ambition, child-bearing and parenting, aging and beyond.

Reflecting on the fraught conversations around disability—from the friend who says “I don’t think of you as disabled,” to the father who scolds his child with attention differences, “Stop it stop it stop it what is wrong with you?”—the stories here reveal the range of responses, and the variety of consequences, to being labeled as “disabled” by the broader public.

Here, a writer recounts her path through medical school as a wheelchair user—forging a unique bridge between patients with disabilities and their physicians. An acclaimed artist with spina bifida discusses her art practice as one that invites us to “stretch ourselves toward a world where all bodies are exquisite.” With these notes of triumph, these stories also offer honest portrayals of frustration over access to medical care, the burden of social stigma and the nearly constant need to self-advocate in the public realm.

In its final sections, About Us turns to the questions of love, family and joy to show how it is possible to revel in life as a person with disabilities. Subverting the pervasive belief that disability results in relentless suffering and isolation, a quadriplegic writer reveals how she rediscovered intimacy without touch, and a mother with a chronic illness shares what her condition has taught her young children. With a foreword by Andrew Solomon and introductory comments by co-editors Peter Catapano and Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, About Us is a landmark publication of the disability movement for readers of all backgrounds, forms and abilities.

Topics Include: Becoming Disabled • Mental Illness is not a Horror Show • Disability and the Right to Choose • Brain Injury and the Civil Right We Don’t Think • The Deaf Body in Public Space • The Everyday Anxiety of the Stutterer • I Use a Wheelchair. And Yes, I’m Your Doctor • A Symbol for “Nobody” That’s Really for Everybody • Flying While Blind • My $1,000 Anxiety Attack • A Girlfriend of My Own • The Three-Legged Dog Who Carried Me • Passing My Disability On to My Children • I Have Diabetes. Am I to Blame? • Learning to Sing Again • A Disabled Life is a Life Worth Living

Date Added: 09/03/2019


Category: General

Words in My Hands

by Diane Chambers

Bert Riedel, an 86-year-old deaf-blind pianist, cut off from the world since age 45, discovers a new life through hand-over-hand sign, taught to him by the author.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Deaf and Hard of Hearing

The War Come Home

by Deborah Cohen

"This impressive book offers a powerful set of insights into the lasting effects of the First World War and the different ways in which belligerent states came to terms with the war's consequences."

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: History of Disabilities

Train Go Sorry

by Leah Hager Cohen

This portrait of New York's Lexington School for the Deaf is not just a work of journalism. It is also a memoir, since Leah Hager Cohen grew up on the school's campus and her father is its superintendent. As a hearing person raised among the deaf, Cohen appreciates both the intimate textures of that silent world and the gulf that separates it from our own.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Learning Outside the Lines

by David Cole and Jonathan Mooney

Every day, your school, your teachers, and even your peers draw lines to measure and standardize intelligence. They decide what criteria make one person smart and another person stupid. They decide who will succeed and who will just get by. Perhaps you find yourself outside the norm, because you learn differently -- but, unlike your classmates, you have no system in place that consistently supports your ability and desire to learn. Simply put, you are considered lazy and stupid. You are expected to fail. Learning Outside the Lines is written by two such "academic failures" -- that is, two academic failures who graduated from Brown University at the top of their class. Jonathan Mooney and David Cole teach you how to take control of your education and find true success -- and they offer all the reasons why you should persevere.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities

Louis Braille

by Margaret Davidson and Compere

A poignant story of the man who developed the Braille system of printing for the blind.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: History of Disabilities

A Brief History of Dog Guides for the Blind

by Nelson Coon

This small book originally an article written by the reference librarian at the Blindiana Library at Perkins School for the Blind highlights the varied and long history of dog guides for blind people. From Pompae, to Japan, from the 15th centure to biblical times the author depicts and writes about dogs guiding blind people. Illustrated with descriptive paintings and texts from various books, this book is a treasure for anyone who loves dogs, and or history.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: History of Disabilities

Independent Living for Physically Disabled People

by Irving Kenneth Zola and Nancy M. Crewe

A text book for students in Rehabilitation Counseling classes.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Physical Disabilities

Through the Rain and Rainbow

by Lyle M. Crist

Richard Kenny lost his sight at age seven. He spent his childhood adjusting to and overcoming blindness. He entered college but had to drop out in his second year when his hearing failed.

The next ten years contained motes of both great anguish and sweet victory as he adjusted to being totally deaf-blind. With perseverance, the support of family and friends, and the counsel of such leaders as Helen Keller and other workers for the deaf and blind, Kenny became the third deaf-blind person in history to earn a college degree. He married, became a father, traveled and wrote.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Deaf and Hard of Hearing

Enabling Acts

by Lennard J. Davis

The first significant book on the history and impact of the ADA--the "eyes on the prize" moment for disability rights.

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is the widest-ranging and most comprehensive piece of civil rights legislation ever passed in the United States, and it has become the model for disability-based laws around the world. Yet the surprising story behind how the bill came to be is little known.

In this riveting account, acclaimed disability scholar Lennard J. Davis delivers the first behind-the-scenes and on-the-ground narrative of how a band of leftist Berkeley hippies managed to make an alliance with upper-crust, conservative Republicans to bring about a truly bipartisan bill.

Based on extensive interviews with all the major players involved including legislators and activists, Davis recreates the dramatic tension of a story that is anything but a dry account of bills and speeches. Rather, it's filled with one indefatigable character after another, culminating in explosive moments when the hidden army of the disability community stages scenes like the iconic "Capitol Crawl" or an event some describe as "deaf Selma," when students stormed Gallaudet University demanding a "Deaf President Now!"

From inside the offices of newly formed disability groups to secret breakfast meetings surreptitiously held outside the White House grounds, here we meet countless unsung characters, including political heavyweights and disability advocates on the front lines. "You want to fight?" an angered Ted Kennedy would shout in an upstairs room at the Capitol while negotiating the final details of the ADA. Congressman Tony Coelho, whose parents once thought him to be possessed by the devil because of his epilepsy, later became the bill's primary sponsor. There's Justin Dart, adorned in disability power buttons and his signature cowboy hat, who took to the road canvassing fifty states, and people like Patrisha Wright, also known as "The General," Arlene Myerson or "the brains," "architect" Bob Funk, and visionary Mary Lou Breslin, who left the hippie highlands of the West to pursue equal rights in the marble halls of DC.

Published for the twenty-fifth anniversary of the ADA, Enabling Acts promises to ignite readers in a discussion of disability rights by documenting this "eyes on the prize" moment for tens of millions of American citizens.

Date Added: 03/08/2018


Category: General

Seeing Beyond Sight

by Tony Deifell

For five years Tony Deifell taught teenagers to take photographs. His students were blind. Unusual as the idea may seem at first, putting cameras in the hands of visually impaired children proved to be extremely fruitful both for the photographers, who found an astonishing new means of self-expression, and for the viewers of their images, for whom this is an entirely new kind of dreamlike and intuitive creation. Even before you know that these pictures were taken by blind teenagers, they are striking in their use of light and composition, and haunting in their chiaroscuro intensity. To learn more, visit http://www.seeingbeyondsight.org/

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Visual Impairments: Culture and the Arts

The Social Dimensions of Learning Disabilities

by Mavis Donahue and Bernice Y. L. Wong

Essays discussiing the social aspects of Learning Disabilities

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Category: Learning Disabilities


Showing 1 through 25 of 102 results