Special Collections

Pulitzer Prize Award Winners

Description: Bookshare is pleased to offer the following titles, winners of the Pulitzer Prize Award. Note: Some drama winners are available and are listed under Fiction awards. #award


Showing 226 through 250 of 328 results
 
 

The Americans

by Daniel J. Boorstin

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize. A study of the last 100 years of American history.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1974

Category: History

Children of Crisis

by Robert Coles

The notoriety of this book rests on two pretty shaky pillars: first, the initial section of the book is supposed to reveal the effects of segregation and desegregation battles on children, mainly through their drawings, which have become almost iconographic; second, the book was the first major effort to look at segregationists as if they were normal human beings and not vile mutants. But the child studies seem dubious and the novelty of the even handed treatment of white Southerners is more of an indictment of the prevailing intellectual hegemony of the 60's than a recommendation for this book in particular.

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1973

Category: Non-Fiction

Migrants, Sharecroppers, Mountaineers (Volume 2 of Children of Crisis)

by Robert Coles

Since the late 1950's, Robert Coles has been studying, living with, and, above all, listening to the American poor. The result is one of the most vigorous and searching social studies ever undertaken by one man in the United States. Migrants, Sharecroppers, Mountaineers is the second volume in Dr. Coles's award-winning series, Children of Crisis. In it, he listens to three groups: the migrant workers who travel the eastern coast of this country, picking crops day after day; the sharecroppers and tenant farmers who live on isolated southern plantations, just as their ancestors did as slaves; and the mountaineers of Appalachia, whose only choice lies between coal mining and starvation.

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1973

Category: Non-Fiction

Fire in the Lake

by Frances Fitzgerald

This landmark work, based on Frances FitzGerald's own research and travels, takes us inside Vietnam into the traditional, ancestor-worshiping villages and the corrupt crowded cities, into the conflicts between Communists and anti-Communists, Catholics and Buddhists, generals and monks and reveals the country as seen through Vietnamese eyes.

With a clarity and authority unrivaled by any book before it or since, Fire in the Lake shows how America utterly and tragically misinterpreted the realities of Vietnam.

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize

Winner of the National Book Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1973

Category: Non-Fiction

People of Paradox

by Michael Kammen

From the beginning, what has given our culture its distinctive texture, pattern, and thrust, according to Michael Kammen, is the dynamic interaction of the imported and the indigenous. He shows how, during the years of colonization, some ideas and institutions were transferred virtually intact from Britain, while, simultaneously, others were being transformed in the New World. As he unravels the tangled origins of our culture, he makes us see that unresolved contradictions in the American experience have created our national style. Puritanical and hedonistic, idealistic and materialistic, peace-loving and war-mongering: these opposing strands go back to the genesis of our history.

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1973

Category: History

The Optimist's Daughter

by Eudora Welty

A young woman who has left the South, returns to New Orleans several years later when her father is dying. After his death, she and her young stepmother go back to the small Mississippi town where she grew up. Alone in the old house, Laurel finally comes to an understanding of the past and herself. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1973

Category: Fiction

Luce and His Empire

by W. A. Swanberg

Henry Luce started Time magazine in the 1940's and went on to create a media empire. He married Clare Booth Luce who became ambassador to Italy.

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1973

Category: Biography

Stilwell and the American Experience in China, 1911-45

by Barbara W. Tuchman

Barbara W. Tuchman uses the life of Joseph Stilwell, the military attache to China in 1935-39 and commander of United States forces and allied chief of staff to Chiang Kai-shek in 1942-44, to explore the history of China from the revolution of 1911 to the turmoil of World War II, when China's Nationalist government faced attack from Japanese invaders and Communist insurgents. Her story is an account of both American relations with China and the experiences of one of our men on the ground. In the cantankerous but level-headed "Vinegar Joe," Tuchman found a subject who allowed her to perform, in the words of The National Review, "one of the historian's most envied magic acts: conjoining a fine biography of a man with a fascinating epic story."

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1972

Category: Non-Fiction

Angle of Repose

by Wallace Stegner and Jackson J. Benson

Stegner’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of personal, historical, and geographic discovery Confined to a wheelchair, retired historian Lyman Ward sets out to write his grandparents' remarkable story, chronicling their days spent carving civilization into the surface of America's western frontier. But his research reveals even more about his own life than he's willing to admit. What emerges is an enthralling portrait of four generations in the life of an American family. "Cause for celebration . . . A superb novel with an amplitude of scale and richness of detail altogether uncommon in contemporary fiction." —The Atlantic Monthly"Brilliant . . . Two stories, past and present, merge to produce what important fiction must: a sense of the enchantment of life." —Los Angeles Times This Penguin Classics edition features an introduction by Jackson J. Benson.For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1972

Category: Fiction

Eleanor and Franklin

by Joseph P. Lash

In his extraordinary biography of the major political couple of the twentieth century, Joseph P. Lash reconstructs from Eleanor Roosevelt's personal papers her early life and four-decade marriage to the four-time president who brought America back from the Great Depression and helped to win World War II. The result is an intimate look at the vibrant private and public worlds of two incomparable people.

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize

Winner of the National Book Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1972

Category: Biography

The Carrier of Ladders

by W. S. Merwin

Pulitzer Prize for Poetry 1971. Merwin has since won a National Book Award for his selected poems and the 2009 Pulitzer for the Shadow of Sirius.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1971

Category: Poetry

The Rising Sun

by John Toland

This history of World War II chronicles the dramatic rise and fall of the Japanese empire, from the invasion of Manchuria and China to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Told from the Japanese perspective, The Rising Sun is, in the author's words, "a factual saga of people caught up in the flood of the most overwhelming war of mankind, told as it happened--muddled, ennobling, disgraceful, frustrating, full of paradox."In weaving together the historical facts and human drama leading up to and culminating in the war in the Pacific, Toland crafts a riveting and unbiased narrative history. In his Foreword, Toland says that if we are to draw any conclusion from The Rising Sun, it is "that there are no simple lessons in history, that it is human nature that repeats itself, not history."

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1971

Category: Non-Fiction

The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds

by Paul Zindel

Beatrice was a mother...and the embittered ringmaster of the circus Hunsdorfer featuring three generations of crazy ladies living under the sloppiest big top on earth. Nanny was no problem. She sat and stared and stayed silent as a venerable vegetable should. Ruth was half-mad and easily bought with an occasional cigarette. But how is the world would Beatrice control Tillie--keeper of rabbits, dreamer of atoms, true believer in life, hope, and the effect of gamma rays on man-in-the-moon marigolds...

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1971

Category: Fiction

Roosevelt

by James Macgregor Burns

The second entry in James Macgregor Burns’s definitive two-volume biography of Roosevelt begins with the president’s precedent-breaking third term election in 1940, just as Americans were beginning to face the likelihood of war. Here, Burns examines Roosevelt’s skillful wartime leadership as well as his vision for post-war peace. Hailed by William Shirer as “the definitive book on Roosevelt in the war years,” and by bestselling author Barbara Tuchman as “engrossing, informative, endlessly readable,” The Soldier of Freedom is a moving profile of a leader gifted with rare political talent in an era of extraordinary challenges, sacrifices, heroism, and hardship.

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize

Winner of the National Book Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1971

Category: Biography

Robert Frost

by Lawrance Thompson

Robert Frost: The Years of Triumph, 1915-1938. Volume two of Thompson's Frost biography receives a Pulitzer Prize despite the controversy raised by Thompson's less-than-sympathetic portrait of this American literary giant.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1971

Category: Biography

Gandhi's Truth

by Erik H. Erikson

In this study of Mahatma Gandhi, psychoanalyst Erik H. Erikson explores how Gandhi succeeded in mobilizing the Indian people both spiritually and politically as he became the revolutionary innovator of militant non-violence and India became the motherland of large-scale civil disobedience.

Winner of the National Book Award

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1970

Category: Non-Fiction

Present at the Creation

by Dean Acheson

In these memoirs by the former Secretary of State, Dean Acheson sees himself as having been "present at the creation" of the American century. Acheson's policies were praised by many and damned by others, including Joseph McCarthy.

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1970

Category: History

The Collected Stories of Jean Stafford

by Jean Stafford

These Pulitzer Prize-winning stories represent the major short works of fiction by one of the most distinctively American stylists of her day.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1970

Category: Fiction

Every Man A King

by Huey P. Long

Huey Long (1893-1935) was one of the most extraordinary American politicians, simultaneously cursed as a dictator and applauded as a benefactor of the masses. A product of the poor north Louisiana hills, he was elected governor of Louisiana in 1928, and proceeded to subjugate the powerful state political hierarchy after narrowly defeating an impeachment attempt. The only Southern popular leader who truly delivered on his promises, he increased the miles of paved roads and number of bridges in Louisiana tenfold and established free night schools and state hospitals, meeting the huge costs by taxing corporations and issuing bonds. Soon Long had become the absolute ruler of the state, in the process lifting Louisiana from near feudalism into the modern world almost overnight, and inspiring poor whites of the South to a vision of a better life. As Louisiana Senator and one of Roosevelt's most vociferous critics, "The Kingfish," as he called himself, gained a nationwide following, forcing Roosevelt to turn his New Deal significantly to the left. But before he could progress farther, he was assassinated in Baton Rouge in 1935. Long's ultimate ambition, of course, was the presidency, and it was doubtless with this goal in mind that he wrote this spirited and fascinating account of his life, an autobiography every bit as daring and controversial as was The Kingfish himself.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1970

Category: Biography

So Human an Animal

by René Dubos

In this collection of stories, the bizarre is rendered normal, the absurd hilarious and the incredible comprehensible. The re-imaginations of reality feature evocations of historical figures, over-televised game show hosts and late-night comedians.

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1969

Category: Non-Fiction

The Armies of the Night

by Norman Mailer

October 21, 1967. Washington DC. Protesters are marching to end the war in Vietnam, Mailer among them. From his perception of the day comes a work that shatters traditional reportage.

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize.

Winner of the National Book Award

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1969

Category: Non-Fiction

House Made of Dawn

by N. Scott Momaday

The magnificent Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of a stranger in his native land A young Native American, Abel has come home from a foreign war to find himself caught between two worlds. The first is the world of his father's, wedding him to the rhythm of the seasons, the harsh beauty of the land, and the ancient rites and traditions of his people. But the other world -- modern, industrial America -- pulls at Abel, demanding his loyalty, claiming his soul, goading him into a destructive, compulsive cycle of dissipation and disgust. And the young man, torn in two, descends into hell.

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1969

Category: Fiction

Rousseau and Revolution

by Will Durant and Ariel Durant

The Story of Civilization, Volume X: winner of the Pulitzer Prize, a history of civilization in France, England, and Germany from 1756, and in the rest of Europe from 1715 to 1789.

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1968

Category: Non-Fiction

The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution

by Bernard Bailyn

In this book, Bailyn discusses the intense, nation-wide debate on the ratification of the Constitution, stressing the continuities between that struggle over the foundations of the national government and the original principles of the Revolution.

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1968

Category: History

The Confessions of Nat Turner

by William Styron

A gripping and unforgettable portrait of the leader of America's bloodiest slave revolt

The Confessions of Nat Turner is William Styron's complex and richly drawn imagining of Nat Turner, the leader of the 1831 slave rebellion in Virginia that led to the deaths of almost sixty men, women, and children. Published at the height of the civil rights movement, the novel draws upon the historical Nat Turner's confession to his attorney, made as he awaited execution in a Virginia jail. This powerful narrative, steeped in the brutal and tragic history of American slavery, reveals a Turner who is neither a hero nor a demon, but rather a man driven to exact vengeance for the centuries of injustice inflicted upon his people. Nat Turner is a galvanizing portrayal of the crushing institution of slavery, and Styron's deeply layered characterization is a stunning rendering of one man's violent struggle against oppression.

This ebook features a new illustrated biography of William Styron, including original letters, rare photos, and never-before-seen documents from the Styron family and the Duke University Archives.

Pulitzer Prize Winner

Date Added: 05/25/2017


Year: 1968

Category: Fiction


Showing 226 through 250 of 328 results