Special Collections

Back to School (K-3) Read Alouds

Description: Reading aloud can be a powerful way to build community and shared understanding at the beginning of the school year. (Can be a part of your social/emotional learning curriculum.) #teachers


Showing 26 through 50 of 51 results

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

by Judith Viorst and Ray Cruz

Alexander knew it was going to be a terrible day when he woke up with gum in this hair. And it got worse... His best friend deserted him. There was no dessert in his lunch bag. And, on top of all that, there were lima beans for dinner and kissing on TV! Judith Viorst's classic picture book is sure to charm readers of all ages. Images and image descriptions available.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Why Do You Cry? Not a Sob Story

by Kate Klise

As his fifth birthday party approaches, Little Rabbit decides to invite only those friends who are also too old to cry until he learns that others of all ages weep for all sorts of reasons.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


When Sophie Gets Angry - Really, Really Angry

by Molly Bang

Sophie gets mad, climbs a tree to calm down, and is soon ready to come home to her loving family. "The text is. . . brief, for it is Bang's double-page illustrations, vibrating with saturated colors, that reveal the drama of the child's emotions. " - School Library Journal, starred review. "Bang's strong, nonproscriptive acknowledgment of a feeling most children will recognize will be welcomed. " - Booklist, starred review

Winner of the Caldecott Honor

Date Added: 07/20/2017


The Name Jar

by Yangsook Choi

The new kid in school needs a new name! Or does she? Being the new kid in school is hard enough, but what about when nobody can pronounce your name? Having just moved from Korea, Unhei is anxious that American kids will like her. So instead of introducing herself on the first day of school, she tells the class that she will choose a name by the following week. Her new classmates are fascinated by this no-name girl and decide to help out by filling a glass jar with names for her to pick from. But while Unhei practices being a Suzy, Laura, or Amanda, one of her classmates comes to her neighborhood and discovers her real name and its special meaning. On the day of her name choosing, the name jar has mysteriously disappeared. Encouraged by her new friends, Unhei chooses her own Korean name and helps everyone pronounce it--Yoon-Hey. From the Hardcover edition.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge

by Mem Fox

A small boy tries to discover the meaning of "memory" so he can restore that of an elderly friend.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Leo the Late Bloomer

by Robert Kraus

Leo isn't reading, or writing, or drawing, or even speaking, and his father is concerned. But Leo's mother isn't. She knows her son will do all those things, and more, when he's ready.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


The Rainbow Fish

by Marcus Pfister

When the little blue fish asks the rainbow fish for just one of his beautiful, shiny scales, the rainbow fish says no and is quite grumpy about it. Word gets out, and soon no one will play with the rainbow fish. Will the great octopus be able to help?

Date Added: 07/20/2017


It's Mine!

by Leo Lionni

Three green frogs learn a lesson about being greedy and the importance of depending upon each other, with the help of a toad who lives on the same island they do. Leo Lionni, has won awards for his artistry in the United States and Worldwide. The scanner has added beautifully detailed descriptions of Leo Lionni's illustrations which will add to a child's enjoyment of this book.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


The Secret Knowledge of Grown-Ups

by David Wisniewski

From Publisher's Weekly: Caldecott winner Wisniewski (Golem) [available from Bookshare] spoofs conspiracy theories in this "confidential" volume, with a jacket designed to resemble a sealed manila envelope and illustrated with intricate cut-paper collages. "As a parent, I went along with it all at first: going to secret meetings... preparing for the day when my kids would want to know why this and why that. But not anymore!" confesses the narrator, whose typewritten words fill a crumpled sheet of brown paper. On the pages that follow, bulletins labeled "TOP SECRET" offer classified information. For example, "Grown-up Rule #31: Eat your vegetables" is followed by "Official Reason: They're good for you." This leads to "The Truth: You don't eat vegetables because they're good for you. You eat vegetables to k...." Here the document is torn as if by an enemy, and a turn of the page reveals, in oversize type: "to keep them under control!" A tyrannosaurus-style broccoli stalk marauds across the accompanying illustration, joined in its depredations by equally sinister carrots, radishes, etc. The engagingly silly formula repeats throughout, the text and the art consistent in their over-the-top humor and sure execution. The mock-official presentation gleefully contrasts with the utter ridiculousness of the "facts," just as the painstaking cut-paper technique contrasts with the loony wit of the compositions themselves. Yet, strangely, the findings seem to prove that young readers should comb their hair and stop blowing bubbles in their milk-could this exposé be the work of a double agent? The Secret Knowledge of Grown-Ups: The Second File continues the fun and is also available from Bookshare. This book includes picture descriptions.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Nasreen's Secret School

by Jeanette Winter

Based on a true story. After her parents are taken away by the Taliban, young Nasreen stops speaking. But as she spends time in a secret school, she slowly breaks out of her shell.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Back-to-school Rules

by Laurie Friedman and Teresa Murfin

When it comes to surviving school, Percy's at the head of the class. If you can follow his ten simple rules, making the grade will be a piece of cake (and school will be a lot of fun).

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Word After Word After Word

by Patricia Maclachlan

Every school day feels the same for fourth graders Lucy and Henry and Evie and Russell and May. Then Ms. Mirabel comes to their class-bringing magical words and a whole new way of seeing and understanding. From beloved author Patricia MacLachlan comes an honest, inspiring story about what is real and what is unreal, and about the ways that writing can change our lives and connect us to our own stories-word after word after word.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Howard B. Wigglebottom Learns to Listen

by Howard Binkow and Susan F. Cornelison

For ages 4-7. Imagine how much easier life would be if children listened better. Meet Howard B Wigglebottom, a curious rabbit who just doesn't listen! This new illustrated book, has been created to help children improve their listening skills and pay attention. Educators, parents, and children alike will laugh and learn as Howard B Wigglebottom learns to listen.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


The Best Story

by Eileen Spinelli and Anne Wilsdorf

The best story is one that comes from the heart The library is having a contest for the best story, and the quirky narrator of this story just has to win that rollercoaster ride with her favorite author! But what makes a story the best? Her brother Tim says the best stories have lots of action. Her father thinks the best stories are the funniest. And Aunt Jane tells her the best stories have to make people cry. A story that does all these things doesn't seem quite right, though, and the one thing the whole family can agree on is that the best story has to be your own. Image descriptions present.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Have You Filled a Bucket Today?

by Carol Mccloud and David Messing

Through sweet, simple prose, this heartwarming book encourages positive behaviour as children see how very easy and rewarding it is to express kindness, appreciation and love on a daily basis. This wonderful book is a winner of seven awards .

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Extra Yarn

by Mac Barnett

With a supply of yarn that never runs out, Annabelle knits for everyone and everything in town until an evil archduke decides he wants the yarn for himself. This looks like an ordinary box full of ordinary yarn. But it turns out it isn't.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Rain School

by James Rumford

It is the first day of school in Chad, Africa. Children are filling the road. "Will they give us a notebook?" Thomas asks. "Will they give us a pencil?” "Will I learn to read?" But when he and the other children arrive at the schoolyard, they find no classroom, no desks. Just a teacher. "We will build our school," she says. "This is our first lesson. " James Rumford, who lived in Chad as a Peace Corps volunteer, fills these pages with the vibrant colors of Africa and the spare words of a poet to show how important learning is in a country where only a few children are able to go to school.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Interrupting Chicken

by David Ezra Stein

It's bedtime for the little red chicken, and papa is going to read her a story. "You're not going to interrupt the story tonight, are you?" asks Papa. "Oh no, Papa. I'll be good," says the little red chicken. But she just can't help herself! Whether it's Hansel and Gretel, Little Red Riding Hood, or Chicken Little, as soon as the story gets going . . . out jumps the little red chicken--right into the story--saving the characters from danger and ending the story early. Will that chicken ever get to sleep?

Date Added: 07/20/2017


School for Bandits

by Hannah Shaw

Ralph Raccoon looks perfectly normal. But he doesn't act normal at all. He's disturbingly well behaved, clean and tidy, shockingly polite, and he even brushes his teeth! Mr. and Mrs. Raccoon are worried--how will Ralph ever become a great raccoon bandit like Grandpa Cutlass or Uncle Whiskers? It's time Ralph learned some bad manners . . . at Bandit School.Ralph has no chance of winning the "Best Bandit in School" competition--he's not very bandit-like at all. But sometimes good manners can be useful, and Ralph just might surprise everyone--including himself.From the Hardcover edition.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Touch the Sky

by Eric Velasquez and Ann Malaspina

Bare feet shouldn't fly.Long legs shouldn't spin,Braids shouldn't flap in the wind."Sit on the porch and be a lady," Papa scolded Alice.In Alice's Georgia hometown, there was no track where an African American girl could practice, so she made her own crossbar with sticks and rags. With the support of her coach, friends, and community, Alice started to win medals. Her dream to compete at the Olympics came true in 1948. This is an inspiring free-verse story of the first African American woman to win an Olympic gold medal. Photos of Alice Coachman are also included.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Those Shoes

by Maribeth Boelts and Noah Z. Jones

All Jeremy wants is a pair of those shoes, the ones everyone at school seems to be wearing. Though Jeremy's grandma says they don't have room for "want," just "need," when his old shoes fall apart at school, he is more determined than ever to have those shoes, even a thrift-shop pair that are much too small. But sore feet aren't much fun, and Jeremy soon sees that the things he has -- warm boots, a loving grandma, and the chance to help a friend -- are worth more than the things he wants.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Swimmy

by Leo Lionni

A Caldecott Honor Book. When a hungry tuna fish comes to call, Swimmy is the only little fish to survive. All alone, he explores the wonders of sea. At last he finds a new school of fish, and discovers a way that they can safely explore together.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Officer Buckle and Gloria

by Peggy Rathmann

Officer Buckle is dedicated to teaching schoolchildren important safety tips, such as never put anything in your ear and never stand on a swivel chair. The problem is, Officer Buckle's school assemblies are dull, dull, dull, and the children of Napville just sleep, sleep, sleep. That is, until Gloria the police dog is invited along!

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Henry Aaron's Dream

by Matt Tavares

Tavares hits one out of the park with this powerful tale of a kid from the segregated South who would become baseball's home-run king. An ideal read for Black History Month and spring training time.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


The Invisible Boy

by Patrice Barton and Trudy Ludwig

Meet Brian, the invisible boy. Nobody ever seems to notice him or think to include him in their group, game, or birthday party . . . until, that is, a new kid comes to class.

When Justin, the new boy, arrives, Brian is the first to make him feel welcome. And when Brian and Justin team up to work on a class project together, Brian finds a way to shine.

From esteemed author and speaker Trudy Ludwig and acclaimed illustrator Patrice Barton, this gentle story shows how small acts of kindness can help children feel included and allow them to flourish.

Any parent, teacher, or counselor looking for material that sensitively addresses the needs of quieter children will find The Invisible Boy a valuable and important resource.

Date Added: 07/20/2017



Showing 26 through 50 of 51 results