Special Collections

Back to School (K-3) Read Alouds

Description: Reading aloud can be a powerful way to build community and shared understanding at the beginning of the school year. (Can be a part of your social/emotional learning curriculum.) #teachers


Showing 26 through 50 of 51 results

The Name Jar

by Yangsook Choi

The new kid in school needs a new name! Or does she? Being the new kid in school is hard enough, but what about when nobody can pronounce your name? Having just moved from Korea, Unhei is anxious that American kids will like her. So instead of introducing herself on the first day of school, she tells the class that she will choose a name by the following week. Her new classmates are fascinated by this no-name girl and decide to help out by filling a glass jar with names for her to pick from. But while Unhei practices being a Suzy, Laura, or Amanda, one of her classmates comes to her neighborhood and discovers her real name and its special meaning. On the day of her name choosing, the name jar has mysteriously disappeared. Encouraged by her new friends, Unhei chooses her own Korean name and helps everyone pronounce it--Yoon-Hey. From the Hardcover edition.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Nasreen's Secret School

by Jeanette Winter

Based on a true story. After her parents are taken away by the Taliban, young Nasreen stops speaking. But as she spends time in a secret school, she slowly breaks out of her shell.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Officer Buckle and Gloria

by Peggy Rathmann

Officer Buckle is dedicated to teaching schoolchildren important safety tips, such as never put anything in your ear and never stand on a swivel chair. The problem is, Officer Buckle's school assemblies are dull, dull, dull, and the children of Napville just sleep, sleep, sleep. That is, until Gloria the police dog is invited along!

Date Added: 07/20/2017


The Old Woman Who Named Things

by Cynthia Rylant and Kathryn Brown

How does an old woman who has outlived all her friends keep from being lonely? By naming the things in her life she knows she will never outlive--like her house, Franklin, and her bed, Roxanne. When a shy brown puppy appears at her front gate, the old woman won't name it, because it might not outlive her. Tender watercolors capture the charm of this heartwarming story of an old woman who doesn't know she's lonely until she meets a plucky puppy who needs a name--and someone to love. "Rylant and Brown together create with affection and lovingly humorous touches a glimpse of old age lived with relish."--Booklist

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Pigs Make Me Sneeze! (An Elephant and Piggie Book)

by Mo Willems

Meet Elephant Gerald and Piggie Gerald is careful. Piggie is not. Piggie cannot help smiling. Gerald can. Gerald worries so that Piggie does not have to. Gerald and Piggie are best friends. In Pigs Make Me Sneeze! Gerald believes that he is allergic to his best friend! Will he have to stay away from Piggie forever?

Date Added: 07/20/2017


The Quiet Book

by Deborah Underwood

There are many kinds of quiet: Quiet can be delicate. Quiet can be thundering! Quiet can be sweet and cozy, and can most definitely help you fall asleep. This gentle picture book explores all the different quiets that can fill a child's day from morning to night.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


The Rainbow Fish

by Marcus Pfister

When the little blue fish asks the rainbow fish for just one of his beautiful, shiny scales, the rainbow fish says no and is quite grumpy about it. Word gets out, and soon no one will play with the rainbow fish. Will the great octopus be able to help?

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Rain School

by James Rumford

It is the first day of school in Chad, Africa. Children are filling the road. "Will they give us a notebook?" Thomas asks. "Will they give us a pencil?” "Will I learn to read?" But when he and the other children arrive at the schoolyard, they find no classroom, no desks. Just a teacher. "We will build our school," she says. "This is our first lesson. " James Rumford, who lived in Chad as a Peace Corps volunteer, fills these pages with the vibrant colors of Africa and the spare words of a poet to show how important learning is in a country where only a few children are able to go to school.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


The Recess Queen

by Alexis O'Neill and Laura Huliska-Beith

A fresh and original twist on the common issue of bullying.

Mean Jean was Recess Queen and nobody said any different. Nobody swung until Mean Jean swung. Nobody kicked until Mean Jean kicked. Nobody bounced until Mean Jean bounced. If kids ever crossed her, she'd push 'em and smoosh 'em lollapaloosh 'em, hammer 'em, slammer 'em kitz and kajammer 'em.

Until a new kid came to school! With her irrepressible spirit, the new girl dethrones the reigning recess bully by becoming her friend in this infectious playground romp.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Ruby the Copycat

by Peggy Rathmann

It's the first day of school, and Ruby is new. When her classmate Angela wears a red bow in her hair, Ruby comes back from lunch wearing a red bow, too. When Angela wears a flowered dress, suddenly Ruby's wearing one, too. Fortunately, Ruby's teacher knows a better way to help Ruby fit in--by showing how much fun it is to be herself!

Date Added: 07/20/2017


School for Bandits

by Hannah Shaw

Ralph Raccoon looks perfectly normal. But he doesn't act normal at all. He's disturbingly well behaved, clean and tidy, shockingly polite, and he even brushes his teeth! Mr. and Mrs. Raccoon are worried--how will Ralph ever become a great raccoon bandit like Grandpa Cutlass or Uncle Whiskers? It's time Ralph learned some bad manners . . . at Bandit School.Ralph has no chance of winning the "Best Bandit in School" competition--he's not very bandit-like at all. But sometimes good manners can be useful, and Ralph just might surprise everyone--including himself.From the Hardcover edition.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


The School Story

by Andrew Clements

Twelve-year-old Natalie Nelson has written a powerful school story. It's a short novel called "The Cheater," and her best friend Zoe is certain it should be published. All Natalie has to do is give the manuscript to her mom, an editor at a big publishing house. However Natalie doesn't want any favors from her mom. Still, Zoe won't drop the idea. Spurred into action, Natalie invents a pen name for herself and Zoe becomes a self-styled literary agent. But if the girls are to succeed, they'll need support from their wary English teacher, legal advice from Zoe's tough-talking father, and some clever maneuvering to outwit the overbearing editor in chief of Shipley Junior Books. Andrew Clements, the best-selling author of Frindle, The Landry News, and The Janitor's Boy, delights his audience with this story of two irrepressible girls who use their talent, ingenuity, and a little cunning to try to make a young writer's dream come true.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


The Secret Knowledge of Grown-Ups

by David Wisniewski

From Publisher's Weekly: Caldecott winner Wisniewski (Golem) [available from Bookshare] spoofs conspiracy theories in this "confidential" volume, with a jacket designed to resemble a sealed manila envelope and illustrated with intricate cut-paper collages. "As a parent, I went along with it all at first: going to secret meetings... preparing for the day when my kids would want to know why this and why that. But not anymore!" confesses the narrator, whose typewritten words fill a crumpled sheet of brown paper. On the pages that follow, bulletins labeled "TOP SECRET" offer classified information. For example, "Grown-up Rule #31: Eat your vegetables" is followed by "Official Reason: They're good for you." This leads to "The Truth: You don't eat vegetables because they're good for you. You eat vegetables to k...." Here the document is torn as if by an enemy, and a turn of the page reveals, in oversize type: "to keep them under control!" A tyrannosaurus-style broccoli stalk marauds across the accompanying illustration, joined in its depredations by equally sinister carrots, radishes, etc. The engagingly silly formula repeats throughout, the text and the art consistent in their over-the-top humor and sure execution. The mock-official presentation gleefully contrasts with the utter ridiculousness of the "facts," just as the painstaking cut-paper technique contrasts with the loony wit of the compositions themselves. Yet, strangely, the findings seem to prove that young readers should comb their hair and stop blowing bubbles in their milk-could this exposé be the work of a double agent? The Secret Knowledge of Grown-Ups: The Second File continues the fun and is also available from Bookshare. This book includes picture descriptions.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Swimmy

by Leo Lionni

A Caldecott Honor Book. When a hungry tuna fish comes to call, Swimmy is the only little fish to survive. All alone, he explores the wonders of sea. At last he finds a new school of fish, and discovers a way that they can safely explore together.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Thank You, Mr. Falker

by Patricia Polacco

When Trisha starts school, she can't wait to learn how to read, but the letters just get jumbled up. She hates being different, and begins to believe her classmates when they call her a dummy.

Then, in fifth grade, Mr. Falker changes everything. He sees through her sadness to the gifted artist she really is. And when he discovers that she can't read, he helps her prove to herself that she can--and will!

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Those Shoes

by Maribeth Boelts and Noah Z. Jones

All Jeremy wants is a pair of those shoes, the ones everyone at school seems to be wearing. Though Jeremy's grandma says they don't have room for "want," just "need," when his old shoes fall apart at school, he is more determined than ever to have those shoes, even a thrift-shop pair that are much too small. But sore feet aren't much fun, and Jeremy soon sees that the things he has -- warm boots, a loving grandma, and the chance to help a friend -- are worth more than the things he wants.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Time to Say "Please"!

by Mo Willems

This book teachs children to say please, excuse me, and I'm sorry.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Today I Feel Silly and Other Moods That Make My Day

by Jamie Lee Curtis

A child's moods range from silliness to anger to excitement, coloring and changing every day.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Touch the Sky

by Eric Velasquez and Ann Malaspina

Bare feet shouldn't fly.Long legs shouldn't spin,Braids shouldn't flap in the wind."Sit on the porch and be a lady," Papa scolded Alice.In Alice's Georgia hometown, there was no track where an African American girl could practice, so she made her own crossbar with sticks and rags. With the support of her coach, friends, and community, Alice started to win medals. Her dream to compete at the Olympics came true in 1948. This is an inspiring free-verse story of the first African American woman to win an Olympic gold medal. Photos of Alice Coachman are also included.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


The Way I Feel

by Janan Cain

Praised by parents, who say it's especially valuable when getting children to talk about the day's triumphs and troubles, and by professionals, who use it in pediatric clinics and with the developmentally disabled and emotionally troubled. Janan Cain's kids ooze anger and bounce with excitement as they teach the words for emotions. Feelings come and feelings go. I never know what they'll be. Silly or angry, happy or sad-- They're all a part of me! * * * Romp with your child through this delightful word book of feelings. The Way I Feel is a wonderful addition to any child's library of books that explain the world out there, as well as the world within. Picture descriptions present.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


We Are in a Book!

by Mo Willems

Gerald is careful. Piggie is not. Piggie cannot help smiling. Gerald can.

Gerald and Piggie are best friends.

In We Are in a Book! Gerald and Piggie discover the joy of being read. But what will happen when the book ends?

Using vocabulary perfect for beginning readers (and vetted by an early-learning specialist), Mo Willems has crafted a mind-bending story that is even more interactive than previous Elephant & Piggie adventures. Fans of the Geisel Award-winning duo won't be able to put this book down--literally!

Date Added: 07/12/2019


When Sophie Gets Angry - Really, Really Angry

by Molly Bang

Sophie gets mad, climbs a tree to calm down, and is soon ready to come home to her loving family. "The text is. . . brief, for it is Bang's double-page illustrations, vibrating with saturated colors, that reveal the drama of the child's emotions. " - School Library Journal, starred review. "Bang's strong, nonproscriptive acknowledgment of a feeling most children will recognize will be welcomed. " - Booklist, starred review

Winner of the Caldecott Honor

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Why Do You Cry? Not a Sob Story

by Kate Klise

As his fifth birthday party approaches, Little Rabbit decides to invite only those friends who are also too old to cry until he learns that others of all ages weep for all sorts of reasons.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge

by Mem Fox

A small boy tries to discover the meaning of "memory" so he can restore that of an elderly friend.

Date Added: 07/20/2017


Wonder

by R. J. Palacio

I won't describe what I look like. Whatever you're thinking, it's probably worse.

August Pullman was born with a facial deformity that, up until now, has prevented him from going to a mainstream school.

Starting 5th grade at Beecher Prep, he wants nothing more than to be treated as an ordinary kid--but his new classmates can't get past Auggie's extraordinary face.

WONDER, now a New York Times bestseller, begins from Auggie's point of view, but soon switches to include his classmates, his sister, her boyfriend, and others. These perspectives converge in a portrait of one community's struggle with empathy, compassion, and acceptance.

In a world where bullying among young people is an epidemic, this is a refreshing new narrative full of heart and hope. R.J. Palacio has called her debut novel "a meditation on kindness" --indeed, every reader will come away with a greater appreciation for the simple courage of friendship.

Auggie is a hero to root for, a diamond in the rough who proves that you can't blend in when you were born to stand out.

Date Added: 07/20/2017



Showing 26 through 50 of 51 results