Special Collections

Coretta Scott King Award Winners

Description: The Coretta Scott King Book Awards are given to outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values. #award #kids #teens


Showing 1 through 25 of 74 results
 
 

Out of Wonder

by Kwame Alexander and Marjory Wentworth and Chris Colderley and Ekua Holmes

Out of gratitude for the poet's art form, Newbery Award-winning author and poet Kwame Alexander, along with Chris Colderley and Marjory Wentworth, present original poems that pay homage to twenty famed poets who have made the authors' hearts sing and their minds wonder. Stunning mixed-media images by Ekua Holmes, winner of a Caldecott Honor and a John Steptoe New Talent Illustrator Award, complete the celebration and invite the reader to listen, wonder, and perhaps even pick up a pen.

Date Added: 04/10/2018


Year: 2018

Award: Illustrator

Duey's Tale

by Pearl Bailey and Arnold Skolnick and Gary Azon

A tale for both children and young adults about a seed, bottle and a branch of tree.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1976

Award: Author

The Stuff of Stars

by Marion Dane Bauer and Ekua Holmes

In an astonishing unfurling of our universe, Newbery Honor winner Marion Dane Bauer and Caldecott Honor winner Ekua Holmes celebrate the birth of every child.

Before the universe was formed, before time and space existed, there was . . . nothing. But then . . . BANG! Stars caught fire and burned so long that they exploded, flinging stardust everywhere. And the ash of those stars turned into planets. Into our Earth. And into us. In a poetic text, Marion Dane Bauer takes readers from the trillionth of a second when our universe was born to the singularities that became each one of us, while vivid illustrations by Ekua Holmes capture the void before the Big Bang and the ensuing life that burst across galaxies. A seamless blend of science and art, this picture book reveals the composition of our world and beyond — and how we are all the stuff of stars.

Date Added: 03/06/2019


Year: 2019

Award: Illustrator

Knock Knock

by Bryan Collier and Daniel Beaty

Every morning, I play a game with my father.He goes knock knock on my doorand I pretend to be asleeptill he gets right next to the bed.And my papa, he tells me, "I love you."But what happens when, one day, that "knock knock" doesn't come? This powerful and inspiring book shows the love that an absent parent can leave behind, and the strength that children find in themselves as they grow up and follow their dreams.

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 2014

Award: Illustrator

Beat the Story Drum, Pum-Pum

by Ashley Bryan

Five traditional Nigerian tales including "Hen and Frog," "Why Bush Cow and Elephant are Bad Friends," "The Husband Who Counted the Spoonfuls," "Why Frog and Snake Never Play Together," and "How Animals Got Their Tails."

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 1981

Award: Illustrator

Beautiful Blackbird

by Ashley Bryan

Black is beautiful, uh-huh! Long ago, Blackbird was voted the most beautiful bird in the forest. The other birds, who were colored red, yellow, blue, and green, were so envious that they begged Blackbird to paint their feathers with a touch of black so they could be beautiful too. Although Black-bird warns them that true beauty comes from within, the other birds persist and soon each is given a ring of black around their neck or a dot of black on their wings -- markings that detail birds to this very day. Coretta Scott King Award-winner Ashley Bryan's adaptation of a tale from the Ila-speaking people of Zambia resonates both with rhythm and the tale's universal meanings -- appreciating one's heritage and discovering the beauty within.

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 2004

Award: Illustrator

Africa Dream

by Eloise Greenfield and Carole Byard

An African-American child dreams of long-ago Africa, where she sees animals, shops in a marketplace, reads strange words from an old book, and returns to the village where her long-ago granddaddy welcomes her. Greenfield's lyrical telling and Byard's marvelous pictures make this book close to an ideal adventure for children, black or white. ' -Publishers Weekly.

1978 Coretta Scott King Award

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1978

Award: Author, Illustrator

Everett Anderson's Goodbye

by Lucille Clifton and Ann Grifalconi

Everett Anderson's Goodbye is a touching portrait of a little boy who is trying to come to grips with his father's death. Lucille Clifton captures Everett's conflicting emotions as he confronts this painful reality. We see him struggle through many stages, from denial and anger to depression and, finally, acceptance. In this spare and moving poem, the last in this acclaimed series, Lucille Clifton brings Everett Anderson's life full circle.

Winner of the 1984 Coretta Scott King Author Award. A Reading Rainbow Selection An NCTE Teachers' Choice

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1984

Award: Author

I, Too, Am America

by Langston Hughes and Bryan Collier

Winner of the Coretta Scott King illustrator award, I, Too, Am America blends the poetic wisdom of Langston Hughes with visionary illustrations from Bryan Collier in this inspirational picture book that carries the promise of equality. This picture book of Langston Hughes's celebrated poem, "I, Too, Am America," is also a Common Core Text Exemplar for Poetry. Image descriptions present.

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 2013

Award: Illustrator

Rosa

by Nikki Giovanni and Bryan Collier

Fifty years after her refusal to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Alabama, city bus, Mrs. Rosa Parks is still one of the most important figures in the American civil rights movement. This tribute to Mrs. Parks is a celebration of her courageous action and the events that followed.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 2006

Award: Illustrator

Uptown

by Bryan Collier

Discover the vibrant world of Harlem, New York, as seen through the eyes of one little boy who lives there. "Uptown ...Harlem, New York. Chicken and waffles. Jazz. Home. "Uptown is a rich mix of flavors, colors, sounds, and cultures that come together to create a vibrant community like no other in the world. Seen through the eyes of one little boy who lives there, the details of life in Harlem are as joyous as a game of basketball on a summer's afternoon and as personal as a trip to the barbershop where old-timers reminisce. Bryan Collier's spare, poetic text and beautiful, intricate illustrations evoke every aspect of Harlem, from the legendary Apollo Theater to chocolate-colored brownstones, weekend shopping on 125th Street, and the music of Duke Ellington.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 2001

Award: Illustrator

Bud, Not Buddy

by Christopher Paul Curtis

It's 1936, in Flint, Michigan. Times may be hard, and ten-year-old Bud may be a motherless boy on the run, but Bud's got a few things going for him: he's got a suitcase filled with his own important, secret things; he's the author of Bud Caldwell's Rules and Things for Having a Funner Life and Marking a Better Liar Out of Yourself and, although his momma never told him who his father was, she left a clue: flyers of Herman E. Calloway and his famous band, the Dusky Devastators of the Depression! Bud's got an idea those flyers will lead him to his father, and nothing's gonna stop him.

Newbery Medal Winner and Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Junior Award

Date Added: 05/20/2019


Year: 2000

Award: Author

Elijah of Buxton

by Christopher Paul Curtis

Master storyteller Christopher Paul Curtis's Newbery Honor novel, featuring his trademark humor, unique narrative voice, and new cover art--now in paperback!

Eleven-year-old Elijah lives in Buxton, Canada, a settlement of runaway slaves near the American border. He's the first child in town to be born free, and he ought to be famous just for that. Unfortunately, all that most people see is a "fra-gile" boy who's scared of snakes and talks too much. But everything changes when a former slave steals money from Elijah's friend, who has been saving to buy his family out of captivity in the South. Now it's up to Elijah to track down the thief--and his dangerous journey just might make a hero out of him, if only he can find the courage to get back home.

Advisory: Bookshare has learned that this book offers only partial accessibility. We have kept it in the collection because it is useful for some of our members. To explore further access options with us, please contact us through the Book Quality link on the right sidebar. Benetech is actively working on projects to improve accessibility issues such as these.

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 2008

Award: Author

Escape to Freedom

by Ossie Davis

Historical drama / 3 Black m, 1 Black f, 2 White m, 1 White f / Various sets / Escape to Freedom is very useful in an educational context for both Black and White children as a tool to teach them about slavery-- and also about the importance of education. The story focuses on the boyhood of Frederick Douglass, born a slave and in later life an abolitionist and orator. Much of the plot centers on Fred's struggle to learn to read, the surest way to freedom. Eventually he attains his freedom and runs off disguised as a free sailor.

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1979

Award: Author

Her Stories

by Virginia Hamilton and Leo Dillon and Diane Dillon

In the tradition of Hamilton's The People Could Fly and In the Beginning, a dramatic new collection of 25 compelling tales from the female African American storytelling tradition. Each story focuses on the role of women--both real and fantastic--and their particular strengths, joys and sorrows.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 1996

Award: Author

The People Could Fly

by Virginia Hamilton and Leo Dillon and Diane Dillon

"THE PEOPLE COULD FLY," the title story in Virginia Hamilton's prize-winning American Black folktale collection, is a fantasy tale of the slaves who possessed the ancient magic words that enabled them to literally fly away to freedom. And it is a moving tale of those who did not have the opportunity to "fly" away, who remained slaves with only their imaginations to set them free as they told and retold this tale.Leo and Diane Dillon have created powerful new illustrations in full color for every page of this picture book presentation of Virginia Hamilton's most beloved tale. The author's original historical note as well as her previously unpublished notes are included.Awards for The People Could Fly collection:Coretta Scott King Award, Booklist Children's Editors' Choice, School Library Journal Best Books of the Year, Horn Book Fanfare, ALA Notable Book, NCTE Teachers' Choice, New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Books of the Year.

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1986

Award: Author

Copper Sun

by Sharon M. Draper

Stolen from her village, sold to the highest bidder, fifteen-year-old Amari has only one thing left of her own -- hope.

Amari's life was once perfect. Engaged to the handsomest man in her tribe, adored by her family, and living in a beautiful village, she could not have imagined everything could be taken away from her in an instant. But when slave traders invade her village and brutally murder her entire family, Amari finds herself dragged away to a slave ship headed to the Carolinas, where she is bought by a plantation owner and given to his son as a birthday present.

Survival seems all that Amari can hope for. But then an act of unimaginable cruelty provides her with an opportunity to escape, and with an indentured servant named Polly she flees to Fort Mose, Florida, in search of sanctuary at the Spanish colony. Can the illusive dream of freedom sustain Amari and Polly on their arduous journey, fraught with hardship and danger?

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 2007

Award: Author

Forged By Fire

by Sharon M. Draper

When Gerald was a child he was fascinated by fire. But fire is dangerous and powerful, and tragedy strikes. His substance-addicted mother is taken from him. Then he loses the loving generosity of a favorite aunt. A brutal stepfather with a flaming temper and an evil secret makes his life miserable. The one bright light in Gerald's life is his little half sister, Angel, whom he struggles to protect from her father, Jordan Sparks, who abuses her, and from their mother, whose irresponsible behavior forces Gerald to work hard to keep the family together. As a teenager, Gerald finds success as a member of the Hazelwood Tigers basketball team, while Angel develops her talents as a dancer. Trouble still haunts them, however, and Gerald learns, painfully, that young friends can die and old enemies must be faced. In the end he must stand up to his stepfather alone in a blazing confrontation. Sharon M. Draper has interwoven characters and events from her previous novel, Tears of a Tiger, in this unflinchingly realistic portrayal of poverty and child abuse. It is an inspiring story of a young man who rises above the tragic circumstances of his life by drawing on the love and strength of family and friends.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 1998

Award: Author

Seventeen Black Artists

by Elton C. Fax

Views the artistic careers of Black men and women whose creations in such media as painting, sculpture, and photography reveal many aspects of the Black experience

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1972

Award: Author

Soul Looks Back In Wonder

by Tom Feelings

A collection of empowering poetry by acclaimed authors such as Maya Angelou, Langston Hughes, and Askia M. Toure. The collection explores the creativity of the African community and how this creative flow provides hope for future generations.

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 1994

Award: Illustrator

The Patchwork Quilt

by Valerie Flournoy

Tanya loved listening to her grand-mother talk about the patchwork quilt as she cut and stitched together the pieces of colorful fabric. A scrap of blue from brother Jim's favorite old pants, a piece of gold left over from Mama's Christmas dress, a bright square from Tanya's Halloween costume-all fit together to make a quilt of memories.

But one day Tanya's grandmother becomes ill, and Tanya doesn't know how to help her. It's then she decides to finish Grandma's masterpiece herself, and with the help of Mama and the whole family, she sets to work.

All the trust and sharing between a young girl and her treasured grand-mother is captured in Valerie Flournoy's story, lovingly illustrated in Jerry Pinkney's evocative paintings.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1986

Award: Illustrator

Ray Charles

by Sharon Bell Mathis and George Ford

In a beautiful new edition of this 1973 multiple award-winning biography, young readers learn the rags-to-riches story of legendary musician Ray Charles's life - from age 7, when he loses his sight completely, to age 40, when he performs to dazzled audiences world-wide and participates in the fight for racial justice. A new introduction by the author sets the context for Charles's journey to stardom, and an afterword updates his life to the present.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1974

Award: Author, Illustrator

The Friendship

by Mildred D. Taylor and Max Ginsberg

Cassie witnesses a black man address a white storekeeper by his first name. "A powerful story . . .Readers will be haunted by its drama and emotion long after they have closed the book." --Booklist

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1988

Award: Author

Bronx Masquerade

by Nikki Grimes

When Wesley Boone writes a poem for his high school English class and reads it aloud, poetry-slam-style, he kicks off a revolution. Soon his classmates are clamoring to have weekly poetry sessions. One by one, eighteen students take on the risky challenge of self-revelation.

Award-winning author Nikki Grimes captures the voices of eighteen teenagers through the poetry they share and the stories they tell, and exposes what lies beneath the skin, behind the eyes, beyond the masquerade.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 2003

Award: Author

Talkin' about Bessie

by Nikki Grimes

Elizabeth "Bessie" Coleman was always being told what she could & couldn't do. In an era when Jim Crow laws and segregation were a way of life, it was not easy to survive. Bessie didn't let that stop her. Although she was only 11 when the Wright brothers took their historic flight, she vowed to become the first African-American female pilot. Her sturdy faith and determination helped her overcome obstacles of poverty, racism, and gender discrimination. Innovatively told through a series of monologues.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/10/2017


Year: 2003

Award: Illustrator


Showing 1 through 25 of 74 results