Special Collections

Coretta Scott King Award Winners

Description: The Coretta Scott King Book Awards are given to outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values. #award #kids #teens


Showing 1 through 25 of 91 results
 
 

Revolution in Our Time

by Kekla Magoon

With passion and precision, Kekla Magoon relays an essential account of the Black Panthers—as militant revolutionaries and as human rights advocates working to defend and protect their community.

In this comprehensive, inspiring, and all-too-relevant history of the Black Panther Party, Kekla Magoon introduces readers to the Panthers' community activism, grounded in the concept of self-defense, which taught Black Americans how to protect and support themselves in a country that treated them like second-class citizens. For too long the Panthers' story has been a footnote to the civil rights movement rather than what it was: a revolutionary socialist movement that drew thousands of members—mostly women—and became the target of one of the most sustained repression efforts ever made by the U.S. government against its own citizens.

Revolution in Our Time puts the Panthers in the proper context of Black American history, from the first arrival of enslaved people to the Black Lives Matter movement of today. Kekla Magoon's eye-opening work invites a new generation of readers grappling with injustices in the United States to learn from the Panthers' history and courage, inspiring them to take their own place in the ongoing fight for justice.

Date Added: 03/22/2023


Year: 2023

Award: Author

Freewater

by Amina Luqman-Dawson

Winner of the John Newbery Medal Winner of the Coretta Scott King Author Award Award-winning author Amina Luqman-Dawson pens a lyrical, accessible historical middle-grade novel about two enslaved children&’s escape from a plantation and the many ways they find freedom. After an entire young life of enslavement, twelve-year-old Homer escapes Southerland Plantation with his little sister Ada, leaving his beloved mother behind. Much as he adores her and fears for her life, Homer knows there&’s no turning back, not with the overseer on their trail. Through tangled vines, secret doorways, and over a sky bridge, the two find a secret community called Freewater, deep in the recesses of the swamp. In this new, free society made up of escaped slaves and some born-free children, Homer cautiously embraces a set of spirited friends, almost forgetting where he came from. But when he learns of a threat that could destroy Freewater, he hatches a plan to return to Southerland plantation, overcome his own cautious nature, and free his mother from enslavement. Loosely based on a little-mined but important piece of history, this is an inspiring and deeply empowering story of survival, love, and courage. 

Date Added: 03/10/2023


Year: 2023

Award: Author

Home Is Not a Country

by Safia Elhillo

A mesmerizing novel in verse about family, identity, and finding yourself in the most unexpected places--for fans of The Poet X, I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter, and Jason Reynolds.

Nima doesn't feel understood. By her mother, who grew up far away in a different land. By her suburban town, which makes her feel too much like an outsider to fit in and not enough like an outsider to feel like that she belongs somewhere else. At least she has her childhood friend Haitham, with whom she can let her guard down and be herself. Until she doesn't.

As the ground is pulled out from under her, Nima must grapple with the phantom of a life not chosen, the name her parents didn't give her at birth: Yasmeen. But that other name, that other girl, might just be more real than Nima knows. And more hungry. And the life Nima has, the one she keeps wishing were someone else's. . .she might have to fight for it with a fierceness she never knew she had."

Nothing short of magic...One of the best writers of our times."-- Elizabeth Acevedo, New York Times Bestselling author of The Poet X

Date Added: 10/18/2022


Year: 2022

Award: Author

Before the Ever After

by Jacqueline Woodson

National Book Award winner Jacqueline Woodson's stirring novel explores how a family moves forward when their glory days have passed.

For as long as ZJ can remember, his dad has been everyone's hero. As a charming, talented pro football star, he's as beloved to the neighborhood kids he plays with as he is to his millions of adoring sports fans. But lately life at ZJ's house is anything but charming. His dad is having trouble remembering things and seems to be angry all the time. ZJ's mom explains it's because of all the head injuries his dad sustained during his career. ZJ can understand that--but it doesn't make the sting any less real when his own father forgets his name. As ZJ contemplates his new reality, he has to figure out how to hold on tight to family traditions and recollections of the glory days, all the while wondering what their past amounts to if his father can't remember it. And most importantly, can those happy feelings ever be reclaimed when they are all so busy aching for the past?

Date Added: 01/25/2021


Year: 2021

Award: Author

Bud, Not Buddy

by Christopher Paul Curtis

It's 1936, in Flint, Michigan. Times may be hard, and ten-year-old Bud may be a motherless boy on the run, but Bud's got a few things going for him: he's got a suitcase filled with his own important, secret things; he's the author of Bud Caldwell's Rules and Things for Having a Funner Life and Marking a Better Liar Out of Yourself and, although his momma never told him who his father was, she left a clue: flyers of Herman E. Calloway and his famous band, the Dusky Devastators of the Depression! Bud's got an idea those flyers will lead him to his father, and nothing's gonna stop him.

Newbery Medal Winner and Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Winner of Pacific Northwest Library Association’s Young Reader’s Choice Junior Award

Date Added: 05/20/2019


Year: 2000

Award: Author

A Few Red Drops

by Claire Hartfield

On a hot day in July 1919, five black youths went swimming in Lake Michigan, unintentionally floating close to the "white" beach.

An angry white man began throwing stones at the boys, striking and killing one.

Racial conflict on the beach erupted into days of urban violence that shook the city of Chicago to its foundations.

This mesmerizing narrative draws on contemporary accounts as it traces the roots of the explosion that had been building for decades in race relations, politics, business, and clashes of culture.

Archival photos and prints, source notes, bibliography, index.

Date Added: 01/28/2019


Year: 2019

Award: Author

Brown Girl Dreaming

by Jacqueline Woodson

Jaqueline Woodson is the 2018-2019 National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature

A President Obama "O" Book Club pick

A Coretta Scott King Award Winner

A New York Times Bestseller and National Book Award and Newbery Honor Book

Jacqueline Woodson, the acclaimed author of Another Brooklyn, tells the moving story of her childhood in mesmerizing verse. Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement.

Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child’s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson’s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.

Date Added: 01/08/2019


Year: 2015

Award: Author

Piecing Me Together

by Renée Watson

2018 Newbery Honor and Coretta Scott King Author Award Winner

Acclaimed author Renee Watson offers a powerful story about a girl striving for success in a world that too often seems like it's trying to break her.

Jade believes she must get out of her poor neighborhood if she's ever going to succeed.

Her mother tells her to take advantage of every opportunity that comes her way. And she has.

She accepted a scholarship to a mostly-white private school and even Saturday morning test prep opportunities. But some opportunities feel more demeaning than helpful.

Like an invitation to join Women to Women, a mentorship program for "at-risk" girls. Except really, it's for black girls. From "bad" neighborhoods.

And just because Maxine, her college-graduate mentor, is black doesn't mean she understands Jade.

And maybe there are some things Jade could show these successful women about the real world and finding ways to make a real difference.

NPR’s Best Books of 2017
A 2017 New York Public Library Best Teen Book of the Year
Chicago Public Library’s Best Books of 2017
A School Library Journal Best Book of 2017
Kirkus Reviews’ Best Teen Books of 2017
2018 Josette Frank Award Winner
A New York Times Bestseller

Jane Addams Children's Book Award Honors Book

Date Added: 02/12/2018


Year: 2018

Award: Author

Martin Luther King, Jr.

by Lillie Patterson and Victor Mays

A brief biography of Martin Luther King Jr, that helps the readers understand what it entails to have a fulfilling and successful life.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1970

Award: Author

Black Troubadour Langston Hughes

by Charlemae H. Rollins

Langston Hughes was an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist. He was one of the earliest innovators of the then-new literary art form jazz poetry. Hughes is best known as a leader of the Harlem Renaissance.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1971

Award: Author

Seventeen Black Artists

by Elton C. Fax

Views the artistic careers of Black men and women whose creations in such media as painting, sculpture, and photography reveal many aspects of the Black experience

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1972

Award: Author

I Never Had It Made

by Jackie Robinson

A straightforward yet inspiring story of what it took to be the first man of color to break into the white world of professional sports. Jackie Robinson's story is more than a telling of his tremendous talent; it is also a recollection that showcases his tenacious spirit, bravery and the courage of his ideals. From the early influences of family and friends, to his time at UCLA, to the army where he challenged racism and Jim Crow laws, Jackie Robinson traces his life to playing in the black leagues, frustrated by the abuses and restrictions of second-class status in professional baseball. As Branch Rickey, president of the Brooklyn Dodgers, began to look around for a player to break the color barrier in 1946, he knew he needed a man of character who could withstand the pressures of his "Noble Experiment. " Choosing Robinson gave both of them the chance to prove what they believed in. Struggles that continued in his personal life and in response to the turbulent sixties are interpreted with insight by Robinson and will give listeners an added appreciation for the amazing strength of his character.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1973

Award: Author

The Legend Of Africania

by Dorothy Robinson and Herbert Temple

Children's book initially explaining the intervention of European exploitation of Africa,the kidnapping of the nation suppression of African expression ( stolen legacy) of self and theft of the motherland's important minerals.

A Coretta Scott King Medal Winner

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1975

Award: Author

Duey's Tale

by Pearl Bailey and Arnold Skolnick and Gary Azon

A tale for both children and young adults about a seed, bottle and a branch of tree.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1976

Award: Author

The Story of Stevie Wonder

by James Haskins

A biography of the blind composer, pianist, and singer who was a child prodigy and went on to win nine Grammy awards.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1977

Award: Author

Escape to Freedom

by Ossie Davis

Historical drama / 3 Black m, 1 Black f, 2 White m, 1 White f / Various sets / Escape to Freedom is very useful in an educational context for both Black and White children as a tool to teach them about slavery-- and also about the importance of education. The story focuses on the boyhood of Frederick Douglass, born a slave and in later life an abolitionist and orator. Much of the plot centers on Fred's struggle to learn to read, the surest way to freedom. Eventually he attains his freedom and runs off disguised as a free sailor.

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1979

Award: Author

The Young Landlords

by Walter Dean Myers

Five devoted friends become landlords and try to make their Harlem neighborhood a better place to live.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1980

Award: Author

This Life

by Sidney Poitier

Poitier's biography is one of bitter sweet humorous at times and seriously moraled at others. His life story rivals that of his films. His dirt poor up bringing with feelings of embarrassment, pride, and humility to his success story and subsequent feelings of strength, ....pride...and yes humility is one that is under-rated and under-appreciated. It just the kind of story that the world needs now.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1981

Award: Author

Let the Circle Be Unbroken

by Mildred D. Taylor

For the Logan family, it is a frightening and turbulent time. First their friend, T.J., must go on trial and confront an all-white jury. Then Cousin Suzella tries to pass for white, with humiliating consequences. And when Cassie's neighbor, Mrs. Lee Annie, stands up for her right to vote, she and her family are driven from their home. Other neighbors are destroyed and shattered by the greed of landowners. But through it all, Cassie and the Logans stand together and stand proud - proving that courage, love, and understanding can defy even the deepest prejudice.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1982

Award: Author

Sweet Whispers, Brother Rush

by Virginia Hamilton

A beautiful ghost appears to a troubled teen and shows her the heartbreaking secrets of her family&’s past Fifteen-year-old Teresa has fallen in love—with a ghost. The handsome man that she&’s passed on the street a few times captures her attention, and she thinks he notices her too. But when the man suddenly appears inside her home, hovering in the air and passing through solid furniture, Teresa realizes this isn&’t going to be a typical crush. The ghost is Brother Rush, a man tied to Teresa&’s past, who has come to show her the ways her life has special meaning, and that her problems at school and at home are not what they seem.

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1983

Award: Author

Everett Anderson's Goodbye

by Lucille Clifton and Ann Grifalconi

Everett Anderson's Goodbye is a touching portrait of a little boy who is trying to come to grips with his father's death. Lucille Clifton captures Everett's conflicting emotions as he confronts this painful reality. We see him struggle through many stages, from denial and anger to depression and, finally, acceptance. In this spare and moving poem, the last in this acclaimed series, Lucille Clifton brings Everett Anderson's life full circle.

Winner of the 1984 Coretta Scott King Author Award. A Reading Rainbow Selection An NCTE Teachers' Choice

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1984

Award: Author

Motown And Didi

by Walter Dean Myers

Motown lives in a burned-out building one floor above the rats, searching out jobs every day, working his muscles every night, keeping strong, surviving. Didi lives in her cool dream bubble, untouched by the Harlem heat that beats down on her brother until only drugs can soothe him. Didi escapes, without needles, in her tidy plans and stainless visions, etchings of ivy covered colleges where her true life will begin. Didi can survive inside her own safe mind, until Motown steps into her real world and makes it bearable. Together they can stand the often brutal present. What about the future?

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1985

Award: Author

The People Could Fly

by Virginia Hamilton and Leo Dillon and Diane Dillon

"THE PEOPLE COULD FLY," the title story in Virginia Hamilton's prize-winning American Black folktale collection, is a fantasy tale of the slaves who possessed the ancient magic words that enabled them to literally fly away to freedom. And it is a moving tale of those who did not have the opportunity to "fly" away, who remained slaves with only their imaginations to set them free as they told and retold this tale.Leo and Diane Dillon have created powerful new illustrations in full color for every page of this picture book presentation of Virginia Hamilton's most beloved tale. The author's original historical note as well as her previously unpublished notes are included.Awards for The People Could Fly collection:Coretta Scott King Award, Booklist Children's Editors' Choice, School Library Journal Best Books of the Year, Horn Book Fanfare, ALA Notable Book, NCTE Teachers' Choice, New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Books of the Year.

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1986

Award: Author

Justin and the Best Biscuits in the World

by Catherine Stock and Mildred Pitts Walter

Ten-year-old Justin hates that his sisters and his mama are always fussing at him. They make him feel stupid because he can't clean his room or cook. But why should he? He'd rather be outside playing. After all, cooking and cleaning is just "women's work." That's why Justin is glad when his grandfather invites him back to his ranch for the summer. Justin is sure he can get away from all the women and do some actual "men's work," such as cleaning fish, mending fences, and riding horses. But back at the ranch, Justin learns some unexpected lessons and soon realizes that anyone can do anything once they learn how.

Winner of the Coretta Scott King Medal

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1987

Award: Author

The Friendship

by Mildred D. Taylor and Max Ginsberg

Cassie witnesses a black man address a white storekeeper by his first name. "A powerful story . . .Readers will be haunted by its drama and emotion long after they have closed the book." --Booklist

Date Added: 08/16/2017


Year: 1988

Award: Author


Showing 1 through 25 of 91 results