Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 37,676 through 37,700 of 111,663 results

Travels with Myself and Another

by Martha Gellhorn

Out of a lifetime of travelling, Martha Gellhorn has selected her "best horror journeys". She bumps through rain-sodden, war-torn China to meet Chiang Kai-Shek, floats listlessly in search of u-boats in the wartime Caribbean and visits a dissident writer in the Soviet Union against her better judgement. Written with the eye of a novelist and an ironic black humour, what makes these tales irresistible are Gellhorns explosive and often surprising reactions. Indignant, but never righteous and not always right, through the crucible of hell on earth emerges a woman who makes you laugh with her at life, while thanking God that you are not with her.

The Spell

by Alan Hollinghurst

Alan Hollinghurst's new novel is a comedy of sexual manners that follows the interlocking affairs of four men: Robin Woodfield, an architect in his late forties, who is trying to build an idyllic life in Dorset with his younger lover, Justin, a would-be actor increasingly disenchanted with the countryside; Robin's 22 year old son Danny, a volatile beauty who lives for clubbing and casual sex; and the shy Alex, whose life is transformed by house music and a tab of ecstasy. As each in turn falls under the spell of romance or drugs,country living or rough trade, a richly ironic picture emerges of the clashing imperatives of modern gay life, the hunger for contact and the fear of commitment, the need for permanence and the continual disruptions of sex. At once lyrical and farcical, sceptical and romantic, The Spell confirms Alan Hollinghurst as one of Britain's most important novelists.

The Silver Cup

by Constance Leeds

It's the year 1095, and fifteen-year-old Anna longs for a different life in her small German village. But as the seasons turn, the year proves anything but ordinary. Her beloved youngest cousin disappears, and another cousin, Martin, runs away to join a murderous army of renegade Crusaders. When Anna risks everything to rescue Leah, an orphaned Jewish girl whose only connection to her former life is a silver cup, the two girls forge a friendship that defies the intolerance of their time. Filling her story with fascinating period details, debut novelist Constance Leeds paints a rich, colorful picture of an eleventh-century life marked by courage, will, and most of all-hope.

The Painter of Signs

by R. K. Narayan

For Raman the sign painter, life is a familiar and satisfying routine. A man of simple, rational ways, he lives with his pious aunt and prides himself on his creative work. But all that changes when he meets Daisy, a thrillingly independent young woman who wishes to bring birth control to the area. Hired to create signs for her clinics, Raman finds himself smitten by a love he cannot understand, much less avoid-and soon realizes that life isn't so routine anymore. Set in R. K. Narayan's fictional city of Malgudi, The Painter of Signs is a wry, bittersweet treasure. .

The Last Girls of Pompeii

by Kathryn Lasky

In Pompeii, in the summer of A. D. 79, Julia and Mitka appear to lead opposite lives. Julia is the daughter of a wealthy ship-builder; Mitka is an orphan. Julia bears the Curse of Venus-a withered arm; Mitka's beauty turns heads. Julia is free; Mitka is her slave. Then Julia learns that her parents are planning to put her in the service of the Temple of Damia, the center of a cultish new religion, and Mitka will be sold to an awful man who plans to make her his concubine. But when Mt. Vesuvius erupts, Julia's and Mitka's fates are forever altered, forcing them both to face the true meaning of freedom.

The Descent of Alette

by Alice Notley

Working in an avant-garde mode, Notley seeks epic stature literally and figuratively in this new collagelike work. Her underground world of subways and lost souls cannot escape comparison to Dante's Inferno but does have its own agenda, both feminist and personal. The multilayered depths are the first and last similarities between Dante and Notley. This epic is a story of transformation and travel, a journey of imagination that is firmly rooted in the reality of urban, modern living. War veterans, the mentally disturbed, homeless people--they are real witnesses and participants in our travel, and we deny or affirm their existence by passing or stopping for them when taking a train or bus. Notley uses this real experience to give strangers voice and to create exchanges so often feared in daily life. Using rhythmic units that resound like dialogue, Notley weaves a conversation of motion and mystery. Underlying Alette's heroic travel to confront the Tyrant who torments souls are keen observations about people and life struggles. Throughout this epic are brief and perceptive comments that restate universal truths and reinforce the urge toward all that is right. Janet St. John

The Courage to Raise Good Men

by Olga Silverstein

"Challenging and readable. . . will help mothers understand the implications of pushing boys out of the family before they're ready to go. "-The Los Angeles Times Book Review. .

The Buccaneers

by Edith Wharton

Set in the 1870s, the same period as Wharton's The Age of Innocence, The Buccaneers is about five wealthy American girls denied entry into New York Society because their parents' money is too new. At the suggestion of their clever governess, the girls sail to London, where they marry lords, earls, and dukes who find their beauty charming-and their wealth extremely useful. After Wharton's death in 1937, The Christian Science Monitor said, "If it could have been completed, The Buccaneers would doubtless stand among the richest and most sophisticated of Wharton's novels. " Now, with wit and imagination, Marion Mainwaring has finished the story, taking her cue from Wharton's own synopsis. It is a novel any Wharton fan will celebrate and any romantic reader will love. This is the richly engaging story of Nan St. George and guy Thwarte, an American heiress and an English aristocrat, whose love breaks the rules of both their societies. .

The Art of War for Executives

by Krause Donald G.

The first book to provide a clear easy-to-follow interpretation of Sun Tzu's classic document. The Art of War for Executives shows how to win on the battlefield of business.

Tan Lejos de Dios

by Ana Castillo

Tome is a small, outwardly sleepy hamlet in central New Mexico. In Ana Castillo's hands, however, it stands wondrously revealed as a place teeming with life and with all manner of collisions: the past with the present, the real with the supernatural, the comic with the horrific, the Native American with the Latino and the Anglo, and the women with the men. With her talkative, intimate voice and stylistic narrative freedom, Castillo relates the story of two crowded decades in the life of a Chicano family. "Engaging . . . the author tells an important story and she tells it with inventiveness and verve. "--Washington Post Book World .

Short Films 101

by Frederick Levy

Where does a young filmmaker begin? With the right short-film concept and this book! The right short can be a filmmaker's "business card" in Hollywood. Here's the authoritative handbook by one of Hollywood's most connected insiders that offers a step-by-step guide through the entire creative process of shooting a short film, as well as expert advice from established filmmakers, and a final game plan for promoting and selling the film once it's in the can. Topics covered include: Concept Budget Finding equipment Assembling a crew Casting Arranging for location Locating festivals and ancillary markets Working with the unions Film vs. digital video Plus: A list of film schools Oscar-winning shorts and nominees A selection of short-film festivals Actual short-film budgets Sample scripts and shooting schedules A helpful short-film glossary .

Sex on the Brain

by Deborah Blum

Go beyond the headlines and the hype to get the newest findings in the burgeoning field of gender studies. Drawing on disciplines that include evolutionary science, anthropology, animal behavior, neuroscience, psychology, and endocrinology, Deborah Blum explores matters ranging from the link between immunology and sex to male/female gossip styles. The results are intriguing, startling, and often very amusing. For instance, did you know that. . . ? Male testosterone levels drop in happy marriages; scientists speculate that women may use monogamy to control male behavior? Young female children who are in day-care are apt to be more secure than those kept at home; young male children less so? Anthropologists classify Western societies as "mildly polygamous" The Los Angeles Times has called Sex on the Brain "superbly crafted science writing, graced by unusual compassion, wit, and intelligence, that forms an important addition to the literature of gender studies. " .

Scarlett

by Cathy Cassidy

Scarlett by Cathy Cassidy is an lovely, addictive page-turner for girls aged 9+ I'll be different, I won't break the rules . . . I promise' Scarlett has got herself in trouble so often, her Mum no longer believes her promises. Sent off to stay with Dad, the message is behave or else! Can Scarlett mend her ways, or will she die of boredom? Perhaps gorgeous and mysterious local boy Kian can supply some of the answers . . . 'Touching, tender and unforgettable' - Guardian'Cassidy's characters have real heart' - Sunday Telegraph'Cathy Cassidy . . . is way better than Jacqueline Wilson' - Courtney, aged 10***www. cathycassidy. com***Cathy Cassidy wrote her first picture book for her little brother when she was eight or nine and has been writing fabulous stories ever since. Cathy is the bestselling author of Dizzy, Driftwood, Indigo Blue, Scarlett, Sundae Girl, Lucky Star, Gingersnaps and Angel Cake. The Chocolate Box Girls is a sumptuous series starring sassy sisters, super-cool boys and one of Cathy's biggest loves - chocolate. Cathy lives in Scotland with her family and of all the jobs she's had, writing has to be the best - it's the perfect excuse to daydream, after all!

Rhiannon

by Vicki Grove

Fourteen-year-old Rhiannon lives high on the bluff of Clodaghcombe with her healer Mom and grandmother. She helps them tend to the sick and wounded from the town below-a town swirling with controversy ever since the arrival of the Norman gentry and the tragic shipwreck that killed the king's only son and heir to the throne. Rhiannon finds herself transfixed imagining the horrid disaster that took so many youths near her own age. Then tragedy strikes closer to home with the discovery of a stranger's body near their bluff and accusations of murder leveled at one of their residents. Rhiannon knows she has to do something even though it means standing up to the aristocracy. But with help from a young monk and a mysterious pirate from France Rhiannon hatches a dangerous plan to discover the true murderer's identity and sets off on a course that could have stunning consequences and perhaps even reveal an astounding secret that could change history.

Reign of Snakes

by Robert Wrigley

Described by the late James Dickey as "one of the finest new poets to come along in years," Robert Wrigley fulfills that early promise with this, his newest collection. Reign of Snakes is a book about desire, the soul's desire as much as the body's. As Jane Hirshfield said of Wrigley's previous book, In the Bank of Beautiful Sins (Penguin, 1995), "To read it is to unpeel a little further into the human, and into the wideness that holds the human--a splendid gift. " Reign of Snakes takes us to yet another level, deep into the daily devotions, "where the dark blows a kiss to night. " . . . a frigid day in February and a full-grown rattlesnake curled to a comma in the middle of the middle of the just-plowed road. Ice ghost, I think, curve of rock or stubbed-off branch. But the diamonds are there, under a dust of crystals looming, impossible, summer's tattoo, the mythical argyle of evil. --from "Reign of Snakes" .

On Teaching and Writing Fiction

by Wallace Stegner

Wallace Stegner founded the acclaimed Stanford Writing Program-a program whose alumni include such literary luminaries as Larry McMurtry, Robert Stone, and Raymond Carver. Here Lynn Stegner brings together eight of Stegner's previously uncollected essays-including four never-before-published pieces -on writing fiction and teaching creative writing. In this unique collection he addresses every aspect of fiction writing-from the writer's vision to his or her audience, from the use of symbolism to swear words, from the mystery of the creative process to the recognizable truth it seeks finally to reveal. His insights will benefit anyone interested in writing fiction or exploring ideas about fiction's role in the broader culture. .

Never Let a Fool Kiss You or a Kiss Fool You

by Mardy Grothe

What do Mae West, John F. Kennedy, Victor Hugo, and H. L. Mencken have in common? They all indulged in chiasmus-a literary device in which word order is reversed to hilarious or poignant effect. When Mae West said, "It's not the men in my life, it's the life in my men," she was using chiasmus; when John F. Kennedy said, "Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country," he was doing the same. Dr. Mardy Grothe has compiled hundreds of examples of chiasmus in this whimsically illustrated collection, bringing this witty and thought-provoking device out of obscurity and into the public imagination. "There is plenty of delight in this overdue collection. " (Houston Chronicle)

Minor Characters

by Joyce Johnson

Jack Kerouac. Allen Ginsberg. William S. Burroughs. LeRoi Jones. Theirs are the names primarily associated with the Beat Generation. But what about Joyce Johnson (nee Glassman), Edie Parker, Elise Cowen, Diane Di Prima, and dozens of others? These female friends and lovers of the famous iconoclasts are now beginning to be recognized for their own roles in forging the Beat movement and for their daring attempts to live as freely as did the men in their circle a decade before Women's Liberation. Twenty-one-year-old Joyce Johnson, an aspiring novelist and a secretary at a New York literary agency, fell in love with Jack Kerouac on a blind date arranged by Allen Ginsberg nine months before the publication of On the Road made Kerouac an instant celebrity. While Kerouac traveled to Tangiers, San Francisco, and Mexico City, Johnson roamed the streets of the East Village, where she found herself in the midst of the cultural revolution the Beats had created. Minor Characters portrays the turbulent years of her relationship with Kerouac with extraordinary wit and love and a cool, critical eye, introducing the reader to a lesser known but purely original American voice: her own. .

Indigara

by Tanith Lee

Jet and her robot dog, Otis, have been taken to their planet's film capital, Ollywood, and are soon catapulted into the unplumbed underworld that lurks below the studios and lots. Here lies the beautiful and sinister otherwhere of Indigara, which has spontaneously generated from the sets, costumes, models, and actual celluloid of rejected pilot fantasy and SF movies that never got made into series. Even while girl and dog try to survive the dangers and terrors below, their Indigaran mirror images have replaced them, and are running amok in the real world above . . .

Hot Hand

by Mike Lupica

#1 New York Times bestseller Mike Lupica scores from downtown with his Comeback Kids series for young middle-grade readers. It's simple. All Billy Raynor wants to do is shoot. After all, he is one of the best shooters in the league. But with his dad as his coach, and his parents newly separated, somehow everything's become complicated. His brother Ben, the piano prodigy, hardly talks anymore. His mom is always traveling on business. And his dad is always on his case about not being a team player. But when Ben's piano recital falls on the same day as the championship game, it is Billy who teaches his dad the true meaning of being a team player. Praise for the Comeback Kids: #147;Lupica portrays the action clearly and vividly, with a real sense of the excitement and unpredictable nature of the games. These are worthy additions to collections seeking to draw in middle-grade boys with an enthusiasm for athletics. " #150;School Library Journal #147;These should score big with middle-graders looking for alternatives to Matt Christopher's titles. " #150;Publisher's Weekly #147;This title is a good choice for reluctant readers with a background in baseball. " #150;School Library Journal

Get a Life, Then Get a Man

by Jennifer Bawden

The key to enjoying the single life is to lead a full and rewarding existence. For dating to be successful, single women must first acquire the most attractive quality--a fun, happy, and productive life. From setting goals, nurturing friendships, and being kind to oneself, Jennifer Bawden provides both practical and inspirational guidance for women who desire a whole new outlook on their singlehood. Once they have gained esteem and support, readers are ready to apply Bawden's frontline tactics for meeting men. From the first approach in a crowded room and strategies for "the call back" to handy icebreakers for the first date, Bawden shows how to proactively pursue a variety of interesting prospects. Get a Life, Then Get a Man inspires women to take back their dating destinies--to get confident in their actions and smart about their choices. In the process, they'll discover that being single can truly be fun, free, and satisfying. .

Full House

by Pete Hautman

Is there any greater thrill than staring down your opponent across the poker table, waiting for the card that will make or break your hand? Acclaimed YA novelist Pete Hautman would know-he's been a poker fanatic for thirty years. And with poker now an international TV phenomenon, the time seems right for an anthology about this most exciting game. From a contest that pits a hapless teen against his girlfriend's redneck family, to a midnight game with the Devil, to an Internet poker scheme gone horribly wrong, the stories here brilliantly reveal how poker can both irrevocably affect and eerily imitate teenage life.

Don't Let Death Ruin Your Life

by Jill Brooke

In her unique guide, Jill Brooke reveals how to cope with grief and turn this time of sadness into an opportunity for positive change and growth. Although they are no longer physically with us, we can keep our loved ones emotionally and spiritually close by incorporating their memories into our daily lives. As we draw comfort from their sustaining presence, we can have a positive impact on those around us. Recent research shows that the trauma of loss can stimulate creativity which leads to new pportunities for happiness and success. Katie Couric and Rosie O'Donnell are just a few people in this book who have coped with loss in unique and special ways. Including tips on how to preserve our memories, create lasting family histories, and reach out to others, Don't Let Death Ruin Your Lifeshows how the experience of grieving helps us to heal, learn, and grow. Filled with gentle guidance and practical advice, this indispensable handbook takes readers on a journey that will motivate, inspire, and transform their lives. "Should be on everyone's bookshelf . . . Charts a survival course with dignity and hope. " (The New York Post)

Death in Summer

by William Trevor

Recognized as one of the greatest living writers of the short story, William Trevor added "bestselling novelist" to his numerous accolades with the publication of Felicia's Journey. Death in Summer, a morally astute and emotionally resonant novel, again shows Trevor at the top of his form. There were three deaths that summer. Letitia went first, leaving her husband, Thaddeus, to relive their final, petty argument and to cope with raising their baby alone. The next death came after Thaddeus's mother-in-law moved into his country house. And finally, after the household seemed to settle down, an unwelcome guest appeared, heralding the third and last of the summer tragedies.

Broken Glass

by Arthur Miller

THE STORY: Brooklyn, New York. The end of November, 1938. Sylvia Gellberg has suddenly, mysteriously, become paralyzed from the waist down. As the play opens, her husband, Phillip, and her doctor, Dr. Hyman, meet to discuss the prognosis and test results. The doctor assures Phillip that physically, there is nothing wrong with his wife and that she is sane, but advises the only way to discover the cause of her paralysis is to probe into her psyche. At this point, the author begins to peel away all the layers of the characters' lives in this stunning, deeply effective exploration of what it means to be American and Jewish in 1938. In his attempts to uncover the truth about Sylvia's paralysis, Dr. Hyman, via conversations with Phillip, Sylvia, and her sister, Harriet, discovers that the Gellberg's marriage was built on resentment and that over the years has become loveless. While Sylvia's affliction leaves her terrified, it exposes Phillip's deepest emotions. He hates himself, and he loathes being Jewish. His self-hatred has always made him cold, and at times even cruel, yet, Sylvia's condition has magnified his feelings leaving him out of control with her, with Dr. Hyman and even with his employers. Dr. Hyman's obsessive determination to cure Sylvia leads him to discover that her paralysis occurred quickly after a newspaper report on Krystallnacht and an accompanying photograph of two old men forced to clean the streets of Germany with toothbrushes. She feels something must be done to stop the Nazis while most Americans believe the Germans won't allow them to get out of hand. But what can she do when she can't even change her own life? The atrocities in Germany, her husband's denial of his Jewishness and her own realization that she threw her life away have overcome her. Suddenly, she no longer simply feels helpless, she has truly become helpless. Finally, with everyone's feelings laid bare, the play comes to its heart-wrenching, electrifying conclusion, as Phillip has a heart attack and begs Sylvia's forgiveness as he dies.

Showing 37,676 through 37,700 of 111,663 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.