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A Philosophy of Second Language Acquisition

by Marysia Johnson

How does a person learn a second language? In this provocative book, Marysia Johnson proposes a new model of second language acquisition (SLA)--a model that shifts the focus from language competence (the ability to pass a language exam) to language performance (using language competently in real-life contexts). Johnson argues that current SLA theory and research is heavily biased in the direction of the cognitive and experimental scientific tradition. She draws on Vygotsky's sociocultural theory and Bakhtin's literary theory to construct an alternative framework for second language theory, research, teaching, and testing. The origin of second language acquisition is not located exclusively in the learner's mind, the author says, but in dialogical interaction conducted in a variety of settings.

The Enlightenment and the Intellectual Foundations of Modern Culture

by Louis Dupré

Dupré (religious studies, Yale U.) explores the philosophical, religious, and historical paths leading from the Enlightenment to modernity, finding it more complex than both its adherents and detractors claim. He explains that questions about habitual acceptance of authority, secular and sacred, are said to have arisen from the ashes of 1648 and came to fruition in the French Revolution of 1789, and that many of the answers seemed rational but were based on unproved assumptions. Dupré finds these questions of the mind were only part of the progression. They formed a way of thinking that continues unabated into modern times, and include in its conventions the detractors of the Enlightenment themselves. He shows how the larger questions of the heart and soul, such as the role of rationality, protection of the individual conscience against religious compulsion, the creative purpose of the self, the nature of true authority, all woven in the Enlightenment, continue to walk amongst us, albeit in modern clothes. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Knowledge of Things Human and Divine: Vico's New Science and Finnegans Wake

by Donald Phillip Verene

This book takes the reader through the career and works of Giambattista Vico (1668-1744) from a new viewpoint. Two major figures introduced Vico to the twentieth century -- Benedetto Croce and James Joyce. From the mid-twentieth century on there was a growing desire to free Vico from the philosophical idealism of Croce, who in the early part of the century had presented Vico as the Italian Hegel.

Preaching in the New Millennium: Celebrating the Tercentennial of Yale University

by Frederick J. Streets

In this collection of sermons, fifteen distinguished religious leaders reflect upon the moral, social, and political nature of our time. The sermons originated during the Tercentennial celebrations at Yale University, and they provide a vivid snapshot of the rich religious history of Yale and its contribution to the character of our nation. Some of America's most prominent religious figures are here, among them William Willimon, William Sloane Coffin, Peter Gomes, Gardner Taylor, and Barbara Brown Taylor. Their sermons offer valuable religious and intellectual insights into our national consciousness both before and after the tragedies of September 11, 2001. In a lively introduction to the volume, Rev. Frederick J. Streets sets the collection in context and contemplates the past and present nature of religious life at Yale.

The Journals of Mary Butts

by Mary Butts Nathalie Blondel

This book contains journals of British writer Mary Butts (1890-1937).

The Bourgeois Frontier: French Towns, French Traders, and American Expansion

by Jay Gitlin

Histories tend to emphasize conquest by Anglo-Americans as the driving force behind the development of the American West. In this fresh interpretation, Jay Gitlin argues that the activities of the French are crucial to understanding the phenomenon of westward expansion. The Seven Years War brought an end to the French colonial enterprise in North America, but the French in towns such as New Orleans, St. Louis, and Detroit survived the transition to American rule. French traders from Mid-America such as the Chouteaus and Robidouxs of St. Louis then became agents of change in the West, perfecting a strategy of "middle grounding" by pursuing alliances within Indian and Mexican communities in advance of American settlement and re-investing fur trade profits in land, town sites, banks, and transportation. The Bourgeois Frontier provides the missing French connection between the urban Midwest and western expansion.

The Nation's Crucible: The Louisiana Purchase and the Creation of America

by Peter J. Kastor

In 1803 the United States purchased Louisiana from France. This seemingly simple acquisition brought with it an enormous new territory as well as the country's first large population of nonnaturalized Americans--Native Americans, African Americans, and Francophone residents. What would become of those people dominated national affairs in the years that followed. This book chronicles that contentious period from 1803 to 1821, years during which people proposed numerous visions of the future for Louisiana and the United States. The Louisiana Purchase proved to be the crucible of American nationhood, Peter Kastor argues. The incorporation of Louisiana was among the most important tasks for a generation of federal policymakers. It also transformed the way people defined what it meant to be an American.

Imagining Zion: Dreams, Designs, and Realities in a Century of Jewish Settlement

by S. Ilan Troen

This timely book tells the fascinating story of how Zionists colonizers planned and established nearly 700 agricultural settlements, towns, and cities from the 1880s to the present. This extraordinary activity of planners, architects, social scientists, military personnel, politicians, and settlers is inextricably linked to multiple contexts: Jewish and Zionist history, the Arab/Jewish conflict, and the diffusion of European ideas to non-European worlds. S. Ilan Troen demonstrates how professionals and settlers continually innovated plans for both rural and urban frontiers in response to the competing demands of social and political ideologies and the need to achieve productivity, economic independence, and security in a hostile environment. In the 1930s, security became the primary challenge, shaping and even distorting patterns of growth. Not until the 1993 Oslo Accords, with prospects of compromise and accommodation, did planners again imagine Israel as a normal state, developing like other modern societies. Troen concludes that if Palestinian Arabs become reconciled to a Jewish state, Israel will reassign priority to the social and economic development of the country and region.

The Modern Prince: What Leaders Need to Know Now

by Carnes Lord

In this penetrating work, an eminent political scientist offers a provocative treatise on the requirements of leadership in the modern world.

Memory Fitness: A Guide for Successful Aging

by Gilles O. Einstein Mark A. Mcdaniel

Do all adults experience memory difficulties as they age? What is the difference between normal memory change and the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease? Is it possible to stem--or even reverse--memory decline? This timely book is a comprehensive guide for the growing number of adults who are eager to learn how aging affects memory and what can or cannot be done about it. Gilles Einstein and Mark McDaniel, widely respected for their research and lectures on memory, explain how memory works and how memory processes change with age. Based on up-to-date and rigorous scientific evidence, they also offer *techniques and strategies for improving memory in everyday life *alternatives to hard-to-use mnemonic techniques *physical and mental exercises that can enhance memory *a review of drugs and nutritional supplements touted to enhance memory *a complete discussion of Alzheimer's disease, its symptoms and risk factors, along with guidance for caretakers *and much more. "A clear and scientific evaluation of age-related memory changes and what can be done to minimize them. "--Timothy Salthouse, director, Cognitive Aging Lab, University of Virginia

Power, Plain English and the Rise of Modern Poetry

by David Rosen

David Rosen offers a radically new account of modern poetry and revises our understanding of its relation to Romanticism. British poets from Wordsworth to Auden attempted to present themselves simultaneously as persons of power and as moral voices in their communities. The modern lyric derives its characteristic complexities--psychological, ethical, formal--from the extraordinary difficulty of this effort. The low register of our language--a register of short, concrete, native words arranged in simple syntax--is deeply implicated in this story. Rosen shows how the peculiar reputation of "plain English" for truthfulness is employed by Modern poets to conceal the rift between their (probably irreconcilable) ambitions for themselves. With a deep appreciation for poetic accomplishment and a wonderful iconoclasm, Rosen sheds new light on the innovative as well as the self-deceptive aspects of Modern poetry. This book alters our understanding of the history of poetry in the English language.

Jerry Herman: Poet of the Showtune

by Stephen Citron

This revealing and comprehensive book tells the full story of Jerry Herman's life and career, from his early work in cabaret to his recent compositions for stage, screen, and television. Stephen Citron draws on extensive open-ended interviews with Jerry Herman as well as with scores of his theatrical colleagues, collaborators, and close friends. The resulting book--which sheds new light on each of Herman's musicals and their scores--abounds in fascinating anecdotes and behind-the-scenes details about the world of musical theater. Readers will find a sharply drawn portrait of Herman's private life and his creative talents. Citron's insights into Herman's music and lyrics, including voluminous examples from each of his musicals, are as instructive as they are edifying and entertaining.

Russia's Dangerous Texts: Politics between the Lines

by Kathleen F. Parthé

Russia's Dangerous Texts examines the ways that writers and their works unnerved and irritated Russia's authoritarian rulers both before and after the Revolution. Kathleen F. Parthé identifies ten historically powerful beliefs about literature and politics in Russia, which include a view of the artistic text as national territory, and the belief that writers must avoid all contact with the state. Parthé offers a compelling analysis of the power of Russian literature to shape national identity despite sustained efforts to silence authors deemed subversive. No amount of repression could prevent the production, distribution, and discussion of texts outside official channels. Along with tragic stories of lost manuscripts and persecuted writers, there is ample evidence of an unbroken thread of political discourse through art. The book concludes with a consideration of the impact of two centuries of dangerous texts on post-Soviet Russia.

Performing the US Latina and Latino Borderlands

by Chela Sandoval Arturo J. Aldama Peter J. García

In this interdisciplinary volume, contributors analyze the expression of Latina/o cultural identity through performance. With music theater, dance, visual arts, body art, spoken word, performance activism, fashion, and street theater as points of entry, contributors discuss cultural practices and the fashoning of identity in Latino/a communities throughout the US. Examining the areas of crossover between Latin and American cultures gives new meaning to the notion of "borderlands." This volume features senior scholars and up-and-coming academics from cultural, visual, and performance studies, folklore, and ethnomusicology.

Creatures of Politics

by Michael Lempert Michael Silverstein

It's a common complaint that a presidential candidate's style matters more than substance and that the issues have been eclipsed by mass-media-fueled obsession with a candidate's every slip, gaffe, and peccadillo. This book explores political communication in American presidential politics, focusing on what political insiders call "message." Message, Michael Lempert and Michael Silverstein argue, is not simply an individual's positions on the issues but the craft used to fashion the creature the public sees as the candidate. Lempert and Silverstein examine some of the revelatory moments in debates, political ads, interviews, speeches, and talk shows to explain how these political creations come to have a life of their own. From the pandering "Flip-Flopper" to the self-reliant "Maverick," the authors demonstrate how these figures are fashioned out of the verbal, gestural, sartorial, behavioral--as well as linguistic--matter that comprises political communication.

An American Tune

by Barbara Shoup

While reluctantly accompanying her husband and daughter to freshman orientation at Indiana University, Nora Quillen hears someone call her name, a name she has not heard in more than 25 years. Not even her husband knows that back in the '60s she was Jane Barth, a student deeply involved in the antiwar movement. An American Tune moves back and forth in time, telling the story of Jane, a girl from a working-class family who fled town after she was complicit in a deadly bombing, and Nora, the woman she became, a wife and mother living a quiet life in northern Michigan. An achingly poignant account of a family crushed under the weight of suppressed truths, An American Tune illuminates the irrevocability of our choices and how those choices come to compose the tune of our lives.

Hip Hop Africa

by Eric S. Charry

Hip Hop Africa explores a new generation of African performers and musicians who are not only consumers of global music but also active participants in the worldwide culture of hip hop and rap. Eric Charry and an international group of contributors look carefully at youth culture and the background of this unprecedented musical movement as well as other contemporary musical currents, including reggae, ragga, gospel music, and drumming.. Covering Senegal, Mali, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Nigeria, Kenya, Tanzania, Malawi, and South Africa, this volume offers unique perspectives on the influences, development, and presence of African hip hop on the global music scene.

Medicine, Mobility, and Power in Global Africa

by Hansjörg Dilger

Recent political, social, and economic changes in Africa have provoked radical shifts in the landscape of health and healthcare. Medicine, Mobility, and Power in Global Africa captures the multiple dynamics of a globalized world and its impact on medicine, health, and the delivery of healthcare in Africa--and beyond. Essays by an international group of contributors take on intractable problems such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, and insufficient access to healthcare, drugs, resources, hospitals, and technologies. The movements of people and resources described here expose the growing challenges of poverty and public health, but they also show how new opportunities have been created for transforming healthcare and promoting care and healing.

The Origin of the Logic of Symbolic Mathematics

by Burt C. Hopkins

Burt C. Hopkins presents the first in-depth study of the work of Edmund Husserl and Jacob Klein on the philosophical foundations of the logic of modern symbolic mathematics. Accounts of the philosophical origins of formalized concepts--especially mathematical concepts and the process of mathematical abstraction that generates them--have been paramount to the development of phenomenology. Both Husserl and Klein independently concluded that it is impossible to separate the historical origin of the thought that generates the basic concepts of mathematics from their philosophical meanings. Hopkins explores how Husserl and Klein arrived at their conclusion and its philosophical implications for the modern project of formalizing all knowledge.

Great River

by Paul. Horgan

Winner of both the Pulitzer Prize and Bancroft Prize for History, Great River was hailed as a literary masterpiece and enduring classic when it first appeared in 1954. It is an epic history of four civilizations--Native American, Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo-American--that people the Southwest through ten centuries. With the skill of a novelist, the veracity of a scholar, and the love of a long-time resident, Paul Horgan describes the Rio Grande, its role in human history, and the overlapping cultures that have grown up alongside it or entered into conflict over the land it traverses. Now in its fourth revised edition, Great River remains a monumental part of American historical writing.

Hiking the Horizontal

by Liz Lerman

The unique career of choreographer Liz Lerman has taken her from theater stages to shipyards, and from synagogues to science labs. In this wide-ranging collection of essays and articles, she reflects on her life-long exploration of dance as a vehicle for human insight and understanding of the world around us. Lerman has been described by the Washington Post as "the source of an epochal revolution in the scope and purposes of dance art." Here, she combines broad outlooks on culture and society with practical applications and accessible stories. Her expansive scope encompasses the craft, structure, and inspiration that bring theatrical works to life as well as the applications of art in fields as diverse as faith, aging, particle physics, and human rights law. Offering readers a gentle manifesto describing methods that bring a horizontal focus to bear on a hierarchical world, this is the perfect book for anyone curious about the possible role for art in politics, science, community, motherhood, and the media.To explore Lerman's dances about science and tools for embodied learning please visit her Science Choreography website: http://sciencechoreography.wesleyan.edu/. The site is a valuable resource for teachers from middle school through the university level. Ebook Edition Note: Two images have been redacted, on page 200, Dances at a Cocktail Party, and on page 201, the bottom photo of Small Dances about Big Ideas.

Dirt for Art's Sake

by Elisabeth Ladenson

In Dirt for Art's Sake, Elisabeth Ladenson recounts the most visible of modern obscenity trials involving scandalous books and their authors. What, she asks, do these often-colorful legal histories have to tell us about the works themselves and about a changing cultural climate that first treated them as filth and later celebrated them as masterpieces? Ladenson's narrative starts with Madame Bovary (Flaubert was tried in France in 1857) and finishes with Fanny Hill (written in the eighteenth century, put on trial in the United States in 1966); she considers, along the way, Les Fleurs du Mal, Ulysses, The Well of Loneliness, Lady Chatterley's Lover, Tropic of Cancer, Lolita, and the works of the Marquis de Sade. Over the course of roughly a century, Ladenson finds, two ideas that had been circulating in the form of avant-garde heresy gradually became accepted as truisms, and eventually as grounds for legal defense. The first is captured in the formula ?art for art's sake'the notion that a work of art exists in a realm independent of conventional morality. The second is realism, vilified by its critics as ?dirt for dirt's sake. ' In Ladenson's view, the truth of the matter is closer to ?dirt for art's sake'the idea that the work of art may legitimately include the representation of all aspects of life, including the unpleasant and the sordid. Ladenson also considers cinematic adaptations of these novels, among them Vincente Minnelli's Madame Bovary, Stanley Kubrick's Lolita and the 1997 remake directed by Adrian Lyne, and various attempts to translate de Sade's works and life into film, which faced similar censorship travails. Written with a keen awareness of ongoing debates about free speech, Dirt for Art's Sake traces the legal and social acceptance of controversial works with critical acumen and delightful wit.

Logics Of Hierarchy

by Alexander Cooley

Political science has had trouble generating models that unify the study of the formation and consolidation of various types of states and empires. The business-administration literature, however, has long experience in observing organizations. According to a dominant model in this field, business firms generally take one of two forms: unitary (U) or multidivisional (M). The U-form organizes its various elements along the lines of administrative functions, whereas the M-form governs its periphery according to geography and territory. In Logics of Hierarchy, Alexander Cooley applies this model to political hierarchies across different cultures, geographical settings, and historical eras to explain a variety of seemingly disparate processes: state formation, imperial governance, and territorial occupation. Cooley illustrates the power of this formal distinction with detailed accounts of the experiences of Central Asian republics in the Soviet and post-Soviet eras, and compares them to developments in the former Yugoslavia, the governance of modern European empires, Korea during and after Japanese occupation, and the recent U. S. occupation of Iraq. In applying this model, Logics of Hierarchy reveals the varying organizational ability of powerful states to promote institutional transformation in their political peripheries and the consequences of these formations in determining pathways of postimperial extrication and state-building. Its focus on the common organizational problems of hierarchical polities challenges much of the received wisdom about imperialism and postimperialism.

The Will To Imagine

by J. L. Schellenberg

The Will to Imagine completes J. L. Schellenberg's trilogy in the philosophy of religion, following his acclaimed Prolegomena to a Philosophy of Religion and The Wisdom to Doubt. This book marks a striking reversal in our understanding of the possibility of religious faith. Where other works treat religious skepticism as a dead end, The Will to Imagine argues that skepticism is the only point from which a proper beginning in religious inquiry-and in religion itself-can be made. For Schellenberg, our immaturity as a species not only makes justified religious belief impossible but also provides the appropriate context for a type of faith response grounded in imagination rather than belief, directed not to theism but to ultimism, the heart of religion. This new and nonbelieving form of faith, he demonstrates, is quite capable of nourishing an authentic religious life while allowing for inquiry into ways of refining the generic idea that shapes its commitments. A singular feature of Schellenberg's book is his claim, developed in detail, that unsuccessful believers' arguments can successfully be recast as arguments for imaginative faith. Out of the rational failure of traditional forms of religious belief, The Will to Imagine fashions an unconventional form of religion better fitted, Schellenberg argues, to the human species as it exists today and as we may hope it will evolve.

Australia in the Global Economy

by Barrie Dyster David Meredith

With the global economy in crisis, there is great need for a deeper understanding of Australia's economic place in the world - both today and throughout history. This new edition of Barrie Dyster and David Meredith's highly successful book is fully updated and includes three new chapters covering until the end of 2011. The book explores the evolution of Australia's position in the global economy from the start of the twentieth century through to the present day, examining the international and local economies of five key historical periods. With a focus on trade, foreign investment and immigration, the book considers periods both of growth and decline. By using historical perspectives to explain the present and give direction to the future, this unique book presents a rich account of Australia's position within a global economic context. It is an essential resource for students and lecturers of Australian economic history.

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