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Showing 39,501 through 39,525 of 72,315 results

An Obsession With Butterflies: Our Long Love Affair With A Singular Insect

by Sharman Apt Russell

Butterflies have always served as a metaphor for resurrection and transformation, but as Sharman Apt Russell points out in this lyrical meditation, butterflies are above all objects of obsession. She reveals the logic behind our endless fascination with butterflies and introduces us to the legendary collectors and dedicated scientists who have obsessively catalogued new species of Lepidoptera. A luminous journey through an exotic world of passion and strange beauty, this is a book to be treasured by anyone who has ever experienced the enchantment of butterflies.

More Terrible Than Death

by Robin Kirk

More Terrible Than Deathis a gripping work that maps the dramatic new relationship between the United States and Colombia in human terms, using portraits of the Colombians and Americans involved, the author's experiences in Colombia as a writer and human rights investigator and an insider's analysis of the political realities that shape the expanding war on drugs and the growing U. S. military presence there. Looking at the war from the ground up, interviewing and profiling human rights activists, guerrillas, and paramilitaries to explain how it has changed their lives, Robin Kirk gives depth and meaning to the headlines that leave unexplained the intimate dimension of the U. S. /Colombian relationship.

All The Stops

by Craig Whitney

A journalist and amateur organist offers an engaging and humorous look at the personalities and music behind the intricate instruments that once represented the pinnacle of musical and technological achievement. Whitney recounts the innovations of master organ builders, the wild popularity of the instrument in America, and the sometimes-bitter rivalries between flamboyant performers who developed their own cult followings. The study concludes with reflection on renewed interest in pipe organ preservation and performance. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Jefferson's War

by Joseph Wheelan

Rulers of the North African countries had routinely collected tribute from Mediterranean sailors until the United States declared the practice "piracy" and fought a naval war to put a stop to the practice. This popular history fashions the conflict as a war which "pitted a modern republic with a free-trade, entrepreneurial creed against a medieval autocracy whose credo was piracy and terror. " The various battles are described and the American naval figures are celebrated. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Love, Poverty, and War

by Christopher Hitchens

"I did not, I wish to state, become a journalist because there was no other #145;profession' that would have me. I became a journalist because I did not want to rely on newspapers for information. "Love, Poverty and War: Journeys and Essaysshowcases America's leading polemicist's rejection of consensus and cliché, whether he's reporting from abroad in Indonesia, Kurdistan, Iraq, North Korea, or Cuba, or when his pen is targeted mercilessly at the likes of William Clinton, Mother Theresa ("a fanatic, a fundamentalist and a fraud"), the Dalai Lama, Noam Chomsky, Mel Gibson and Michael Bloomberg. Hitchens began the nineties as a "darling of the left" but has become more of an "unaffiliated radical" whose targets include those on the "left," who he accuses of "fudging" the issue of military intervention in the Balkans, Afghanistan and Iraq. Yet, as Hitchens shows in his reportage, cultural and literary criticism, and opinion essays from the last decade, he has not jumped ship and joined the right but is faithful to the internationalist, contrarian and democratic ideals that have always informed his work.

Wag the Dog

by Larry Beinhart

Once upon a time there was a mean, dying GOP chairman who had a brilliant scheme to assure that his man would retain the office of president of the United States of America. And the only man who could pull off this elaborate plan was a celebrated Hollywood director. Add to the mix a left-coast gumshoe named Broz who is trapped among cover-ups, undercover work, and his own morality, a cast of bicoastal desperate characters, and the stage is set for a powerful D. C. /L. A. production. From Edgar award winning author Larry Beinhart, Wag the Dog was the most brilliant political satire of the last decade. It was made into a classic film by Barry Levinson, and, fortunately, is now back in print.

The Choice

by Zbigniew Brzezinski

American power and a pervasive globalization are the central realities of today's world, and the source of its thorniest dilemmas. Yet while America's unprecedented might should be the source of global security, Americans today feel less secure than ever. Globalization promotes American dominance even as it breeds anti-American resentment. In The Choice, former National Security Advisor Zbigniew Brzezinski addresses the historic choice facing America at this very moment: Will it strive to dominate the world, or lead it? Reminding us that American dominance should not be confused with omnipotence, Brzezinski shows how America's well-being and the world's are entwined, and that America must find a way to be both guarantor of global security and promoter of the global common good. "When it comes to what might be called the 'philosophy' of foreign policy-the relationship of U. S. power and policy to broader historical and cultural trends-no statesman of Brzezinski's generation is in his league. . . . A tour d'horizon of U. S. foreign policy [that] discusses the inevitable contradictions and tensions that enmesh a democratic society that is also a global hegemon, criticizes the Bush administration, and articulates his own vision of the way forward-all in a little over 200 pages. Even those who do not accept Brzezinski's critique of the Bush administration will admire the sagacity of his views; for Democrats attempting to assemble a serious and thoughtful alternative to Bush's foreign policy, The Choice is indispensable. "-Walter Russell Mead, Foreign Affairs

Carrying the Word

by Susanna Rostas

In Carrying the Word: The Concheros Dance in Mexico City, the first full length study of the Concheros dancers, Susanna Rostas explores the experience of this unique group, whose use of dance links rural religious practices with urban post-modern innovation in distinctive ways even within Mexican culture, which is rife with ritual dances. The Concheros blend Catholic and indigenous traditions in their performances, but are not governed by a predetermined set of beliefs; rather they are bound together by long standing interpersonal connections framed by the discipline of their tradition. The Concheros manifest their spirituality by means of the dance. Rostas traces how they construct their identity and beliefs, both individual and communal, by its means. The book offers new insights into the experience of dancing as a Conchero while also exploring their history, organization and practices. Carrying the Word provides a new way for audiences to understand the Conchero's dance tradition, and will be of interest to students and scholars of contemporary Mesoamerica. Those studying identity, religion, and tradition will find this social-anthropological work particularly enlightening

A Caring Approach in Nursing Administration

by Jan J. Nyberg

Current mainstream books and publicity about management and administration in health care are concerned with the takeover of health care by managed-care organizations. Many provide lots of quick and externally focused answers. Many of them are economically driven, to the exclusion of humans, values, ethics, and the human spirit of all those who pass through systems as deliverers and receivers of care. On the other hand, there is a new generation of works that address new forms of administration and leadership-works that inspire and evoke foundational changes in health care and forms of organizational leadership and management. This work by Dr. Jan Nyberg is guided by a lifelong career of administration and management that is informed by deeper human dimensions of caring, and more lasting approaches to change than quick-fix, economic takeovers.

Brenda Is in the Room & Other Poems

by Craig Morgan Teicher

The winner of the 2007 Colorado Prize for Poetry, this is a beautiful and original work that appears to be, on first impression, a light-hearted and amusingly self-conscious account of daily life, but reminds us that our mundane lives are utterly strange and magical.

The Boys of Winter

by Charles J. Sanders

The Boys of Winter tells the true story of three young American ski champions and their brutal, heroic, and fateful transformation from athletes to infantrymen with the 10th Mountain Division. Charles J. Sanders's fast-paced narrative draws on dozens of interviews and extensive research to trace these boys' lives from childhood to championships and from training at Mount Rainier and in the Colorado Rockies to battles against the Nazis.

Big Wonderful

by Kevin Holdsworth

In this unconventional memoir, Kevin Holdsworth vividly portrays life in remote, unpredictable country and ruminates on the guts - or foolishness - it takes to put down roots and raise a family in a merciless environment. Growing up in Utah, Holdsworth couldn't wait to move away. Once ensconced on the East Coast, however, he found himself writing westerns and dreaming of the mountains he'd skied and climbed. Fed up with city life, he moved to a small Wyoming town. In Big Wonderful, he writes of a mountaineering companion's death, the difficult birth of his son, and his father's terminal illness - encounters with mortality that sharpened his ideas about risk, care, and commitment. He puts a new spin on mountaineering literature, telling wild tales from his reunion with the mountains but also relating the surprising willpower it took to turn back from risks he would have taken before he became a father. He found he needed courage to protect and engage deeply with his family, his community, and the wild places he loves. Holdsworth's essays and poems are rich with anecdotes, characters, and vivid images. Readers will feel as if they themselves watched a bear destroy an entire expedition's food, walked with his great-great-grandmother along the icy Mormon Trail, and tried to plant a garden in Wyoming's infamous wind. Readers who love the outdoors will enjoy this funny and touching take on settling down and adventuring in the West's most isolated country.

Bayou Salado

by Virginia Mcconnell Simmons

Bayou Salado is an engaging look at the history of a high cool valley in the Rocky Mountains. Now known as South Park, Bayou Salado once attracted Ute and Arapaho hunters as well as European and American explorers and trappers. Virginia McConnell Simmons's colorful accounts of some of the valley's more notable residents - such as Father Dyer, the skiing Methodist minister-mailman, and Silver Heels, the dancer who lost her legendary beauty while tending to the ill during a small pox epidemic - bring the valley's storied past to life.

The Arapaho Language

by Andrew Cowell Alonzo Moss Sr.

The Arapaho Language is the definitive reference grammar of an endangered Algonquian language. Arapaho differs strikingly from other Algonquian languages, making it particularly relevant to the study of historical linguistics and the evolution of grammar. Andrew Cowell and Alonzo Moss Sr. document Arapaho's interesting features, including a pitch-based accent system with no exact Algonquian parallels, radical innovations in the verb system, and complex contrasts between affirmative and non-affirmative statements. Cowell and Moss detail strategies used by speakers of this highly polysynthetic language to form complex words and illustrate how word formation interacts with information structure. They discuss word order and discourse-level features, treat the special features of formal discourse style and traditional narratives, and list gender-specific particles, which are widely used in conversation. Appendices include full sets of inflections for a variety of verbs. Arapaho is spoken primarily in Wyoming, with a few speakers in Oklahoma. The corpus used in The Arapaho Language spans more than a century of documentation, including multiple speakers from Wyoming and Oklahoma, with emphasis on recent recordings from Wyoming. The book cites approximately 2,000 language examples drawn largely from natural discourse - either recorded spoken language or texts written by native speakers. With The Arapaho Language, Cowell and Moss have produced a comprehensive document of a language that, in its departures from its nearest linguistic neighbors, sheds light on the evolution of grammar.

Benjamin V. Cohen: Architect of the New Deal

by William Lasser

This is a biography of Benjamin V. Cohen focusing on the "New Deal" giant.

Futurism: An Anthology

by Lawrence Rainey Christine Poggi Laura Wittman

In 1909, F. T. Marinetti published his incendiary Futurist Manifesto, proclaiming, "We stand on the last promontory of the centuries!!" and "There, on the earth, the earliest dawn!" Intent on delivering Italy from "its fetid cancer of professors, archaeologists, tour guides, and antiquarians," the Futurists imagined that art, architecture, literature, and music would function like a machine, transforming the world rather than merely reflecting it. But within a decade, Futurism's utopian ambitions were being wedded to Fascist politics, an alliance that would tragically mar its reputation in the century to follow. Published to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the founding of Futurism, this is the most complete anthology of Futurist manifestos, poems, plays, and images ever to be published in English, spanning from 1909 to 1944. Now, amidst another era of unprecedented technological change and cultural crisis, is a pivotal moment to reevaluate Futurism and its haunting legacy for Western civilization.

Stars and Other Signs: Poems

by Marie Borroff

These poems were written over a period of more than fifty years during which, though most of my time was of necessity devoted to scholarship and teaching, the writing of poems was an essential part of life.

Who's Teaching Your Children? Why the Teacher Crisis Is Worse Than You Think and What Can Be Done About It

by Vivian Troen Katherine C. Boles

Many of the problems afflicting American education are the result of a critical shortage of qualified teachers in the classrooms. The teacher crisis is surprisingly resistant to current reforms and is getting worse. This important book reveals the causes underlying the crisis and offers concrete, affordable proposals for effective reform. Vivian Troen and Katherine Boles, two experienced classroom teachers and education consultants, argue that because teachers are recruited from a pool of underqualified candidates, given inadequate preparation, and dropped into a culture of isolation without mentoring, support, or incentives for excellence, they are programmed to fail. Half quit within their first five years. Troen and Boles offer an alternative, a model of reform they call the Millennium School, which changes the way teachers work and improves the quality of their teaching. When teaching becomes a real profession, they contend, more academically able people will be drawn into it, colleges will be forced to,improve the quality of their education, and better-prepared teachers will enter the classroom and improve the profession. For more information, visit the website at www. trilemmasolutions. com

Nutcracker Nation: How an Old World Ballet Became a Christmas Tradition in the New World

by Jennifer Fisher

The Nutcracker is the most popular ballet in the world, adopted and adapted by hundreds by hundreds of communities across the United States and Canada every Christmas season. In this entertainingly informative book, Jennifer Fisher offers new insights into the Nutcracker phenomenon, examining it as a dance scholar and critic, a former participant, an observer of popular culture, and an interviewer of those who dance, present, and watch the beloved ballet. Fisher traces The Nutcracker's history from its St. Petersburg premiere in 1892 through its emigration to North America in the mid-twentieth century to the many productions of recent years. She notes that after it was choreographed by another Russian immigrant to the New World, George Balanchine, the ballet began to thrive and variegate: Hawaiians added hula, Canadians added hockey, Mark Morris set it in the swinging sixties, and Donald Byrd placed it in Harlem. The dance world underestimates The Nutcracker at its peril, Fisher suggests, because the ballet,is one of its most powerfully resonant traditions. After starting life as a Russian ballet based on a German tale about a little girl's imagination, The Nutcracker has become a way for Americans to tell a story about their communal values and themselves.

Directions in Sexual Harassment Law

by Catharine A. Mackinnon Reva B. Siegel

When it was published twenty-five years ago, Catharine MacKinnon's pathbreaking work Sexual Harassment of Working Women had a major impact on the development of sexual harassment law. The U. S. Supreme Court accepted her theory of sexual harassment in 1986. Here MacKinnon collaborates with eminent authorities to appraise what has been accomplished in the field and what still needs to be done. An introductory essay by Reva Siegel considers how sexual harassment came to be regulated as sex discrimination. Contributors discuss how law can best address sexual harassment; the importance and definition of consent and unwelcomeness; issues of same-sex harassment; questions of institutional responsibility for sexual harassment in both employment and education settings; considerations of freedom of speech; effects of sexual harassment doctrine on gender and racial justice; and transnational approaches to the problem. An afterword by MacKinnon assesses the changes wrought by sexual harassment law in the past quarter century.

Religious Pluralism in America: The Contentious History of a Founding Ideal

by William R. Hutchison

In this reappraisal of American religious history, William Hutchison chronicles the country's struggle to fulfill the promise of its founding ideals. In 1800 the United States was an overwhelmingly Protestant nation. Over the next two centuries, Catholics, Mormons, Jews, Muslims, Hindus, and others emerged to challenge the Protestant mainstream. Although their demands were often met with resistance, Hutchison demonstrates that as a result of these conflicts we have expanded our understanding of what it means to be a religiously diverse country. No longer satisfied with mere legal toleration, we now expect that all religious groups will share in creating our national agenda. This book offers a groundbreaking and timely history of our efforts to become one nation under multiple gods. --BOOK JACKET. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

A Schoenberg Reader: Documents of a Life

by Joseph Henry Auner

Arnold Schoenberg and his music have been objects of celebration, controversy, and vilification for more than a century, from the time of his first performances to the present day. Not surprisingly, in accounts of his life and works by both his champions and his critics the adjective Schoenbergian has come to mean so many things as to be almost meaningless.

City: Urbanism and Its End

by Douglas W. Rae

How did neighborhood groceries, parish halls, factories, and even saloons contribute more to urban vitality than did the fiscal might of postwar urban renewal? In the grand lineage of Robert Putnam's Bowling Alone and Jane Jacob's The Death and Life of Great American Cities, Douglas Rae depicts the features that contributed most to city life in the early "urbanist" decades of the twentieth century. Rae's subject is New Haven, Connecticut, but the lessons he draws apply to many American cities. Starting with a vivid sketch of the guests attending a party in August 1919, City: Urbanism and Its End presents a portrait of New Haven in a period of centralized manufacturing, civic vitality, and mixed-use neighborhoods. As social and economic conditions changed, the city confronted its end of urbanism, first during the Depression, and then very aggressively during the mayoral reign of Richard C. Lee (1954-70), when New Haven led the nation in urban renewal spending. Strategies for the urban future should focus on nurturing the unplanned civic engagements that make mixed-use city life so appealing and so civilized. Small-scale retailing, neighborhood clubs, informal enforcement of sidewalk civility, and new urbanist design may be the keys to the future. Cities need not reach their old peaks of population, or look like thriving suburbs, to be once again splendid places for human beings to live and work. --BOOK JACKET. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

The Yale Guide to Women's Reproductive Health: From Menarche to Menopause

by Mary Jane Minkin Carol V. Wright

This book is for every woman who has wished for an unhurried, personal conversation with a sympathetic doctor who will answer her questions about reproductive health. With warmth and understanding, the authors respond to questions about the gynecological issues that concern women today.

Downtown: Its Rise and Fall, 1880-1950

by Robert M. Fogelson

Downtown is the first history of what was once viewed as the heart of the American city. Urban historian Robert Fogelson gives a riveting account of how downtown--and the way Americans thought about it--changed between 1880 and 1950. Recreating battles over subways and skyscrapers, the introduction of elevated highways and parking bans, and other controversies, this book provides a new and often starling perspective on downtown's rise and fall.

Showing 39,501 through 39,525 of 72,315 results

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