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Showing 39,501 through 39,525 of 71,991 results

Pass Thru Fire :

by Lou Reed

Containing a body of work that spans more than three decades, Pass Thru Fire is a stunning collection of the lyrics of an American original. Through his many incarnations-from proto punk to glam rocker to elder statesman of the avant garde-Lou Reed's work has maintained an undeniable vividness and raw beauty, fueled by precise character studies and rendered with an admirable shot of moral ambiguity. Beginning with his formative days in the Velvet Underground and continuing through his remarkable solo career-albums like Transformer, Berlin, New York, Magic and Loss, and Ecstasy-Pass Thru Fire is crucial to an appreciation of Lou Reed, not only as a consummate underground musician, but as one of the truly significant poets of our time.

Eating for Recovery

by Molly Siple

You can reverse the physical damage of alcoholism with nature's best medicine: food. Common side effects of excessive drinking include poor digestive and liver function; problems with managing blood sugar; weakened circulatory, immune, and nervous systems; and impaired thinking and changes in mood-regulating hormones. While the primary focus of anyone recovering from alcoholism is staying sober, a critical part of recovery involves halting or reversing the physical damage of excessive alcohol consumption. Registered Dietitian Molly Siple's innovative program helps you improve your health, detoxify, and reduce the risk of degenerative diseases linked to alcohol abuse. Siple's stress-free, uncomplicated program offers: Critical information on common physical ailments brought on by alcoholism Lists of "recovery foods" that help combat specific ills and improve health Manageable recovery goals and easy ways to implement them Easy-to-make recipes for every meal, including snacks and beverages 21 days worth of menus to jump-start nutritious eating Shopping lists, recommendations for eating out, and other resources Eating for Recovery's guidelines, practical tips, recipes and varied meal plans make it the essential resource for anyone seeking to restore their health and vitality after alcohol abuse.

A Mended and Broken Heart: The Life and Love of Francis of Assisi

by Wendy Murray

Francis of Assisi is Catholicism's most popular saint. Tens of millions of spiritual seekers summon his name and example. But the real Francis--both his complicated personality and his complex theology--have been misunderstood for centuries. In 1228, Pope Gregory IX rushed to canonize St. Francis only two years after his death. Soon thereafter, the Church eliminated significant aspects of his biography from the public record. For Francis's early life was defined by his profligacy; shortly before dying, Francis himself warned his brothers: "Don't be too quick to canonize me. I am perfectly capable of fathering a child. " In A Mended and Broken Heart, journalist Wendy Murray slices through the bowdlerized version of Francis's life promoted within the Catholic tradition and reveals instead a saint who was in every way also a real man. Murray stresses in particular the crucial but completely neglected role that Clare of Assisi played in Francis's life, both pre- and post-conversion, and his theology. A profoundly humane portrait of a misunderstood saint, A Mended and Broken Heart makes a powerful case that St. Francis's life and thought make him a role model for religious seekers of every faith.

Zhou Enlai :

by Gao Wenqian

Zhou Enlai, the premier of the People's Republic of China from 1949 until his death in 1976, is the last Communist political leader to be revered by the Chinese people. He is considered "a modern saint" who offered protection to his people during the Cultural Revolution; an admirable figure in an otherwise traumatic and bloody era. Works about Zhou in China are heavily censored, and every hint of criticism is removed-so when Gao Wenqian first published this groundbreaking, provocative biography in Hong Kong, it was immediately banned in the People's Republic. Using classified documents spirited out of China, Gao Wenqian offers an objective human portrait of the real Zhou, a man who lived his life at the heart of Chinese politics for fifty years, who survived both the Long March and the Cultural Revolution not thanks to ideological or personal purity, but because he was artful, crafty, and politically supple. He may have had the looks of a matinee idol, and Nixon may have called him "the greatest statesman of our era," but Zhou's greatest gift was to survive, at almost any price, thanks to his acute understanding of where political power resided at any one time.

Man the Hunted

by Hart

Although "Man the Hunter" is a popular description of our ancestry, the central importance of hunting is firmly fixed only in the archeological record of relatively recent human history. Man the Huntedargues that primates, including the earliest members of the human family, have evolved not as hunters but as the prey of any number of predators, including wild cats and dogs, hyenas, snakes, crocodiles, and even birds of prey. Eyewitness accounts, data collected by the authors, and the published reports of naturalists establish the astonishing extent to which living monkeys, lemurs, apes, and even humans fall victim to a wide variety of predators, some of which even specialize in the consumption of primates. Additionally, the fossil record demonstrates that primates have been prey for millions of years, a fact that necessarily shaped the evolution of our earliest ancestors in body and behavior. Skillfully combining information from a number of lines of evidence,Man the Huntedcasts an entirely new light on the natural history of primates and the evolution of fossil and modern humans.

Africa in World Politics

by Harbeson

Political scientists and economists examine issues presented by the improvements in domestic economic and politics in sub-Saharan Africa and the emergence of the region onto the world stage. Among their topics are the heritage of colonialism, promising democratization trajectories in Africa's weak states, inter-African negotiations and reforming political order, and China's engagement in Africa. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Programming Microsoft® Web Forms

by Douglas J. Reilly

Get the focused, straightforward information you need to master the most common challenges in developing real-world Web Forms applications. Whether you're a new or experienced developer, you'll learn the essential techniques for exploiting new forms and controls in Microsoft ASP.NET 2.0--enabling you to write Web applications more quickly and with less code. Discover how to: Work with standard ASP.NET controls for common tasks Create your own user controls and custom server controls Lay out forms with HTML and Cascading Style Sheets Create common page elements just once with Master Pages Style your Web Forms with themes and skins Add Web Parts and allow users to personalize pages Access and edit data with Microsoft ADO.NET objects Bind data to your form controls--without adding any code Create security-enhanced Web applications Integrate your Web forms with Windows Forms applications PLUS--Get code samples on the Web

When The War Was Over

by Elizabeth Becker

Award-winning journalist Elizabeth Becker started covering Cambodia in 1973 for The Washington Post, when the country was perceived as little more than a footnote to the Vietnam War. Then, with the rise of the Khmer Rouge in 1975 came the closing of the border and a systematic reorganization of Cambodian society. Everyone was sent from the towns and cities to the countryside, where they were forced to labor endlessly in the fields. The intelligentsia were brutally exterminated, and torture, terror, and death became routine. Ultimately, almost two million people-nearly a quarter of the population-were killed in what was one of this century's worst crimes against humanity. When the War Was Over is Elizabeth Becker's masterful account of the Cambodian nightmare. Encompassing the era of French colonialism and the revival of Cambodian nationalism; 1950s Paris, where Khmer Rouge leader Pol Pot received his political education; the killing fields of Cambodia; government chambers in Washington, Paris, Moscow, Beijing, Hanoi, and Phnom Penh; and the death of Pol Pot in 1998; this is a book of epic vision and staggering power. Merging original historical research with the many voices of those who lived through the times and exclusive interviews with every Cambodian leader of the past quarter century, When the War Was Over illuminates the darkness of Cambodia with the intensity of a bolt of lightning.

What Dying People Want

by David Kuhl

Facing death results in more fear and anxiety than any other human experience. Though much has been done to address the physical pain suffered by those with a terminal illness, Western medicine has been slow to understand and alleviate the psychological and spiritual distress that comes with the knowledge of death. In What Dying People Want, Dr. David Kuhl begins to bridge that gap by addressing end-of-life realities--practical and emotional--through his own experiences as a doctor and through the words and experiences of people who knew that they were dying. Dr. Kuhl presents ways of finding new life in the process of dying, understanding the inner reality of living with a terminal illness, and addressing the fear of pain, as well as pain itself. He also offers concrete guidance on how to enhance doctor/patient relationships and hold family meetings, and provides an introduction to the process of life review. It is possible to find meaning and peace in the face of death. What Dying People Want "helps us learn to view the knowledge of death as a gift, not a curse. " (New Times)

Vietnam, Now

by David Lamb

Thirty years after he covered the Vietnam War as a young combat correspondent, Lamb returned to live in Vietnam for four years to document the country's recovery from war. Through intimate stories of personal encounters with students, former soldiers, shopkeepers, Communist Party members, and returning boat people, he gives insight into how Vietnam has managed to bury the residue of war and why the Vietnamese now welcome Americans. B&w photos are included. The author has written five previous books on diverse topics. Annotation c. Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Underboss

by Dick Lehr Gerard O'Neill

Longtime investigative reporters for the describe how in the 1980s a group of FBI agents brought down Gennaro J. "Jerry" Angiulo and his four brothers, who had run the Mafia in Boston for decades. Their coup was placing a bug at the main office. The 1989 edition was cloth bound. Annotation c. Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Sword And The Olive

by Martin Van Creveld

Offers a complete history of the Israeli Defense Force (IDF), tracing it from its beginnings in Palestine in the early 1900s to the present day. Examines Israeli conflicts, debunks prominent myths about the IDF, and includes in-depth profiles of Israeli soldiers and leaders, as well as their Arab counterparts. While detailing the accomplishments of the Israeli armed forces, material also investigates the erosion of morale in the modern IDF. Annotation c. Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Monroe Doctrine

by Lorraine Monroe

Leadership is the key to excellence. And leadership can be learned. Thank goodness, because many people who fall into managerial positions haven't the foggiest notion how to lead. They don't feel driven to attain the competencies of a boss--much less a great boss. Lorraine Monroe is a born leader. She caught the bug early, as secretary of the student council in the fourth grade at P. S. 157 in Central Harlem. She went on to found the Frederick Douglass Academy in Harlem, a remarkably successful and innovative public school, and became one of the most respected education reformers in America. Now Monroe translates her extensive experience in New York City public schools into the "Monroe Doctrine" to show other education and business leaders how to create and maintain high-achieving organizations. The Monroe Doctrine offers readers concrete lessons in the craft of leadership. Its brief, catchy lessons and anecdotes will help potential leaders tap into their natural gifts and harness those gifts to lead seemingly by instinct. Monroe's personal story of conquering the most overwhelming challenges will inspire leaders of all types to try new ideas to enrich their lives and the lives of their organizations. With The Monroe Doctrine by their side, readers will be able to lead any organization--whether a hospital, a house of worship, a sorority, a family, a school, or a business--with renewed passion and results.

The Math Gene

by Keith Devlin

The Maths Gene explains how the human mind came to - and continues to - perform mathematical reasoning. Where does this ability come from? Our prehistoric ancestors' brains were essentially the same as ours, so they must have had the same underlying ability. What purpose could it serve in 50,000bc? And what exactly goes on in our brains when we multiply 15 by 36 or prove Fermat's last theorem? The answer, according to Keith Devlin, lies within our genes and more specifically with the pattern-making abilities with which we are born. He uses this insight to reveal why some people feel that they 'can't do maths', while a select few excel at the subject and to suggest ways in which we can improve our mathematical skills. He also answers the following questions: o Are there things I can do to improve my mathematical skills? (YES) o Can new-born babies do mathematics? (YES) o Do mathematicians have a key secret that enables them to do mathematics with apparent ease? (YES) o Do Chinese and Japanese children have a built-in advantage over American and European children when it comes to learning mathematics? (YES)

The Man Who Shocked The World

by Thomas Blass

The creator of the famous "Obedience Experiments," carried out at Yale in the 1960s, and originator of the "six degrees of separation" concept, Stanley Milgram was one of the most innovative scientists of our time. In this sparkling biography-the first in-depth portrait of Milgram-Thomas Blass captures the colorful personality and pioneering work of a social psychologist who profoundly altered the way we think about human nature. Born in the Bronx in 1933, Stanley Milgram was the son of Eastern European Jews, and his powerful Obedience Experiments had obvious intellectual roots in the Holocaust. The experiments, which confirmed that "normal" people would readily inflict pain on innocent victims at the behest of an authority figure, generated a firestorm of public interest and outrage-proving, as they did, that moral beliefs were far more malleable than previously thought. But Milgram also explored other aspects of social psychology, from information overload to television violence to the notion that we live in a small world. Although he died suddenly at the height of his career, his work continues to shape the way we live and think today. Blass offers a brilliant portrait of an eccentric visionary scientist who revealed the hidden workings of our very social world.

The Last Three Minutes

by Paul Davies

Ragnarok. Armageddon. Doomsday. Since the dawn of time, man has wondered how the world would end. InThe Last Three Minutes,Paul Davies reveals the latest theories. It might end in a whimper, slowly scattering into the infinite void. Then again, it might be yanked back by its own gravity and end in a catastrophic "Big Crunch. " There are other, more frightening possibilities. We may be seconds away from doom at this very moment. Written in clear language that makes the cutting-edge science of quarks, neutrinos, wormholes, and metaverses accessible to the layman,The Last Three Minutestreats readers to a wide range of conjectures about the ultimate fate of the universe. Along the way, it takes the occasional divergent path to discuss some slightly less cataclysmic topics such as galactic colonization, what would happen if the Earth were struck by the comet Swift-Tuttle (a distinct possibility), the effects of falling in a black hole, and how to create a "baby universe. " Wonderfully morbid to the core, this is one of the most original science books to come along in years.

The Ideas That Conquered The World

by Michael Mandelbaum

This is a paperbound reprint of a 2002 book about which Book News wrote: Continuing in the same tradition as Francis Fukuyama's , political science professor (and senior fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations) Mandelbaum continues the argument that capitalism and democracy are inextricably linked and that so-called "free markets" have emerged as indisputably triumphant in the world of contesting political and economic ideas. In exploring the political affairs of the United States, Europe, the Middle East, Russia, and China, he advances two propositions about liberal democracies that may seem surprising to observers of the current international scene: that democracies tend to conduct peaceful foreign affairs and that free markets naturally lead to democracy. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Hip-Hop Generation: Young Blacks and the Crisis in African-american Culture

by Bakari Kitwana

Young blacks born between 1965 and 1984 belong to the first generation to have grown up in post-segregation America. Their historical significance is tremendous, but until now there has been no in-depth study of the African American youth who are making this important chapter in our nation's history. Bakari Kitwana, one of black America's sharpest young cultural critics, offers a sobering look at his generation's disproportionate incarceration and unemployment rates, as well as the collapse of its gender relations, and gives his own provocative social and political analysis. He finds the pain of his generation buried in tough, slick gangsta movies, and their voice in the lyrics of rap music, "the black person's CNN. " By turns scathing, funny, and analytic, The Hip Hop Generation will stand as the testament of black youth culture at the turn of the century. With extraordinary insight and understanding, Bakari Kitwana has combined the culture and politics of his generation into a pivotal work in American studies.

The Haunted Smile

by Lawrence J. Epstein

It has been estimated that although Jews comprise only three percent of Americans, over 80% of comedians are Jewish. A specialist in American Jewish life, Epstein (English, Suffolk Community College) argues that Jewish comedy is tinged by bitter encounters with anti-Semitism, a desire to be accepted, and concern for a culture disappearing at the same time it draws on a long tradition of Jewish humor. Annotation c. Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Dust Of Empire

by Karl Meyer

This paperback edition of the book which was originally published in 2003 includes a new introduction titled "On America After Iraq. " Meyer, a journalist and coauthor of (1999), seeks to educate Americans in the post-9/11 terrorist war context about the history of a perennial "hotspot" that has long viewed the US as an empire. Includes a map of Asia and photos of US, British, and Soviet players in the region. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Day the Voices Stopped: A Memoir of Madness and Hope

by Ken Steele Claire Berman

For thirty-two years Ken Steele lived with the devastating symptoms of schizophrenia, tortured by inner voices commanding him to kill himself, ravaged by the delusions of paranoia, barely surviving on the ragged edges of society. In this inspiring story, Steele tells the story of his hard-won recovery from schizophrenia and how activism and advocacy helped him regain his sanity and go on to give hope and support to so many others like him.

The Chastening

by Paul Blustein

Blustein, who covered the financial crises and the IMF in the 1990s from his position as a staff writer for the ), turned the story into a surprisingly engaging tale published in 2001 (also with PublicAffairs) and now available in this paperback edition. Annotation (c)2003 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Birth of the Mind

by Gary Marcus

Writing for a lay audience, Marcus (psychology, New York U. ) goes through the sticky question about how much our genes contribute to our mental lives. He believes genes do not control our destinies, but they do affect our personalities, temperaments, and other qualities that make each person unique. He shows how the brain developed its structure across evolution, how humans are hard-wired to learn and to acquire language in ways other animals are not, which common-sense perceptions about the relationship between genetics, brain structures, and the human mind are simply wishful thinking, and how the new genetics is likely to impact the development of the mind in the future. He takes into account a number of leading-edge experiments, such as those that have produced mice that exhibit behaviors indicating high anxiety. He also works mindfully though the most recent literature. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Birth Of A Mother

by Daniel N. Stern Nadia Bruschweiler-Stern Alison Freeland

As you prepare to become a mother, you face an experience unlike any other in your life. Having a baby will redirect your preferences and pleasures and, most likely, will realign some of your values. As you undergo this unique psychological transformation, you will be guided by new hopes, fears, and priorities. In a most startling way, having a child will influence all of your closest relationships and redefine your role in your family's history. The charting of this remarkable, new realm is the subject of this compelling book. Renowned psychiatrist Daniel N. Stern has joined forces with pediatrician and child psychiatrist Nadia Bruschweiler-Stern and journalist Alison Freeland to paint a wonderfully evocative picture of the psychology of motherhood. At the heart ofThe Birth of a Motheris an arresting premise: Just as a baby develops physically in utero and after birth, so a mother is born psychologically in the many months that precede and follow the birth of her baby. The recognition of this inner transformation emerges from hundreds of interviews with new mothers and decades of clinical experience. Filled with revealing case studies and personal comments from women who have shared this experience, this book will serve as an invaluable sourcebook for new mothers, validating the often confusing emotions that accompany the development of this new identity. In addition to providing insight into the unique state of motherhood, the authors touch on related topics such as going back to work, fatherhood, adoption, and premature birth. During pregnancy, mothers-to-be talk about morning sickness and their changing bodies, and new mothers talk about their exhaustion, the benefits of nursing or bottle-feeding, and the dilemma of whether or when they should return to work. And yet, they can be strangely mute about the dramatic and often overwhelming changes going on in their inner lives. Finally, withThe Birth of a Mother, these powerful feelings are eloquently put into words.

Taboo

by Jon Entine

In virtually every sport in which they are given opportunity to compete, people of African descent dominate. East Africans own every distance running record. Professional sports in the Americas are dominated by men and women of West African descent. Why have blacks come to dominate sports? Are they somehow physically better? And why are we so uncomfortable when we discuss this? Drawing on the latest scientific research, journalist Jon Entine makes an irrefutable case for black athletic superiority. We learn how scientists have used numerous, bogus "scientific" methods to prove that blacks were either more or less superior physically, and how racist scientists have often equated physical prowess with intellectual deficiency. Entine recalls the long, hard road to integration, both on the field and in society. And he shows why it isn't just being black that matters-it makes a huge difference as to where in Africa your ancestors are from. Equal parts sports, science and examination of why this topic is so sensitive, Taboois a book that will spark national debate.

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