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The Last Summer

by Judith Kinghorn

A sweepingly epic and gloriously intimate commercial debut - a beautiful and haunting story of lost innocence and a powerful, enduring love. Clarissa is almost seventeen when the spell of her childhood is broken. It is 1914, the beginning of a blissful, golden summer - and the end of an era. DeyningPark is in its heyday, the large country house filled with the laughter and excitement of privileged youth preparing for a weekend party. When Clarissa meets Tom Cuthbert, home from university and staying with his mother, the housekeeper, she is dazzled. Tom is handsome and enigmatic; he is also an outsider. Ambitious, clever, his sights set on a career in law, Tom is an acute observer, and a man who knows what he wants. For now, that is Clarissa. As Tom and Clarissa's friendship deepens, the wider landscape of political life around them is changing, and another story unfolds: they are not the only people in love. Soon the world - and all that they know - is rocked by a war that changes their lives for ever.

What's a Dog For?

by John Homans

John Homans adopted his dog, Stella, from a shelter for all the usual reasons: fond memories of dogs from his past, a companion for his son, an excuse for long walks around the neighborhood. Soon enough, she is happily ensconced in the daily workings of his family. And not only that: Stella is treated like a family member--in ways that dogs of his youth were not. Spending humanlike sums on vet bills, questioning her diet and exercise regimens, contemplating her happiness--how had this all come to pass, when the dogs from Homans's childhood seemed quite content living mostly out in the yard?In What's a Dog For?, Homans explores the dog's complex and prominent place in our world and how it came to be. Evolving from wild animals to working animals to nearly human members of our social fabric, dogs are now the subject of serious scientific studies concerning pet ownership, evolutionary theory, and even cognitive science. From new insights into what makes dogs so appealing to humans to the health benefits associated with owning a dog, Homans investigates why the human-canine relationship has evolved so rapidly--how dogs moved into our families, our homes, and sometimes even our beds in the span of a generation, becoming a $53 billion industry in the United States in the process. As dogs take their place as coddled family members and their numbers balloon to more than seventy-seven million in the United States alone, it's no surprise that canine culture at large is also undergoing a massive transformation. They are now subject to many of the same questions of rights and ethics as people, and the politics of dogs are more tumultuous and public than ever-- with fierce moral battles raging over kill shelters, puppy mills, and breed standards. Incorporating interviews and research from scientists, activists, breeders, and trainers, What's a Dog For? investigates how dogs have reached this exalted status and why they hold such fascination for us. With one paw in the animal world and one paw in the human world, it turns out they have much to teach us about love, death, and morality--and ultimately, in their closeness and difference, about what it means to be human. .

A Working Theory of Love

by Scott Hutchins

A Working Theory of Love by Scott Hutchins is a brilliantly witty novel of 21st century relationships for readers of Nick Hornby and Douglas Coupland. 'Electrifying. Clever, funny and very entertaining' The New York Times'Tremendous, big, clever . . . Every once in a while a novel comes along and speaks to a generation . . . Hutchins expertly charts the terrain of love, and what it means to fall, and fall hard' Guardian'Touching and extremely funny, Neill Bassett is a disenchanted bachelor for the Noughties generation. Brilliantly achieved' GQRecently divorced, thirty-six-year-old Neill Bassett is engaged in an extraordinary experiment. By day, he works at a Silicon Valley software company, where he is helping to create the world's first 'living' artificial intelligence -- a computer programme based on the personality of his late father. By night, he is attempting to reconcile his own emotional shortcomings with the unexpected attractions of an intriguing young woman called Rachel. The question is: what does it take to be a real human being?Set in San Francisco, where anything goes (and regularly does), this recklessly witty, formidably funny, outrageously honest novel captures the exquisite agony of contemporary relationships. 'Likened to the work of Nick Hornby . . . humorous and quietly profound' Observer'Worthy of Chuck Palahniuk . . . Hutchins's satirical take on 21st-century existence is sharply observed' Independent'Smart, breezy, an assured debut . . . Mixing the everyman likeability of Nick Hornby with a splash of the offbeat intellect of Douglas Coupland' Metro'Zeitgeisty, poignant and funny' The Herald'Inventive, intelligent and sometimes hilarious. One of the pleasures here is Hutchins' terrific grasp of the zeitgest' San Francisco Chronicle'A brainy, bright, laughter-through-tears, can't-stop-reading-until-it's-over kind of novel' Gary Shteyngart'Terrific. Throughout, Hutchins hits that sweet spot where humour and melancholy comfortably coexist' Entertainment Weekly'Original, wise, full of serious thinking, serious fun and the shock of the new. Astonishing' Adam Johnson, author of The Orphan Master's Son'Terrific. And intriguing, original take on family and friendship, lust and longing, grief and forgiveness' Associated Press'Wonderful. Brilliantly observant about the way we live now. Comic and haunting' Charles Baxter, author of The Feast of Love'Beautifully written and consistently engaging. Charming, warm-hearted and thought-provoking' The New York Times'Inventive and engaging' New YorkerScott Hutchins teaches at Stanford University, California. His work has appeared in StoryQuarterly, The Rumpus, The New York Times and Esquire. This is his first novel.

There Was A Country

by Chinua Achebe

From the legendary author of Things Fall Apart comes this long-awaited memoir recalling Chinua Achebe's personal experiences of and reflections on the Biafran War, one of Nigeria's most tragic civil warsChinua Achebe, the author of Things Fall Apart, was a writer whose moral courage and storytelling gifts have left an enduring stamp on world literature. There Was a Country was his long-awaited account of coming of age during the defining experience of his life: the Nigerian Civil War, also known as the Biafran War of 1967-1970. It became infamous around the world for its impact on the Biafrans, who were starved to death by the Nigerian government in one of the twentieth century's greatest humanitarian disasters. Caught up in the atrocities were Chinua Achebe and his young family. Achebe, already a world-renowned novelist, served his Biafran homeland as a roving cultural ambassador, witnessing the war's full horror first-hand. Immediately after the war, he took an academic post in the United States, and for over forty years he maintained a considered silence on those terrible years, addressing them only obliquely through his poetry. After years in the making There Was a Country presents his towering reckoning with one of modern Africa's most fateful experiences, both as he lived it and eventually came to understand it. Marrying history and memoir, with the author's poetry woven throughout, There Was a Country is a distillation of vivid observation and considered research and reflection. It relates Nigeria's birth pangs in the context of Achebe's own development as a man and a writer, and examines the role of the artist in times of war. Reviews:'No writer is better placed than Chinua Achebe to tell the story of the Nigerian Biafran war . . . [The book] makes you pine for the likes of Achebe to govern . . . We have in There Was a Country an elegy from a master storyteller who has witnessed the undulating fortunes of a nation' Noo Saro-Wiwa, Guardian'Chinua Achebe's history of Biafra is a meditation on the condition of freedom. It has the tense narrative grip of the best fiction. It is also a revelatory entry into the intimate character of the writer's brilliant mind and bold spirit. Achebe has created here a new genre of literature' Nadine Gordimer'Part-history, part-memoir, [Achebe's] moving account of the war is laced with anger, but there is also an abiding tone of regret for what Nigeria might have been without conflict and mismanagement' Sunday TimesAbout the author:Chinua Achebe was born in Nigeria in 1930. He published novels, short stories, essays, and children's books. His volume of poetry, Christmas in Biafra, was the joint winner of the first Commonwealth Poetry Prize. Of his novels, Arrow of God won the New Statesman-Jock Campbell Award, and Anthills of the Savannah was a finalist for the 1987 Booker Prize. Things Fall Apart, Achebe's masterpiece, has been published in fifty different languages and has sold more than ten million copies. Achebe lectured widely, receiving many honors from around the world, amongst them the Nigerian National Merit Award, Nigeria's highest award for intellectual achievement. In 2007, he won the Man Booker International Prize. He died in March 2013.

A Thousand Mornings

by Mary Oliver

Mornings with the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Mary Oliver In A THOUSAND MORNINGS, Mary Oliver returns to the imagery that has come to define her life's work, transporting us to the marshland and coastline of her beloved home, Provincetown, Massachusetts. In these pages, Oliver shares the wonder of dawn, the grace of animals, and the transformative power of attention. Whether studying the leaves of a tree or mourning her adored dog, Percy, she is ever patient in her observations and open to the teachings contained in the smallest of moments. Our most precious chronicler of physical landscape, Oliver opens our eyes to the nature within, to its wild and its quiet. With startling clarity, humor, and kindness, A THOUSAND MORNINGS explores the mysteries of our daily experience. .

Interventions

by Kofi Annan

"[A] resolute, detailed, and unflinching review of [Annan's] most difficult hours...No one ever came closer to being the voice of "we the peoples" and no one paid a higher price for it. The world still needs such a voice, but the next person who tries to fill that role will want to reflect long and hard on the lessons of this candid, courageous, and unsparing memoir. " --Michael Ignatieff, The New York Review of Books Receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in December 2001, United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan spoke to a world still reeling from the terrorist attacks of September 11. "Ladies and Gentlemen," proclaimed Annan, "we have entered the third millennium through a gate of fire. If today, after the horror of 11 September, we see better, and we see further-we will realize that humanity is indivisible. New threats make no distinction between races, nations, or regions. " Yet within only a few years the world was more divided than ever-polarized by the American invasion of Iraq, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the escalating civil wars in Africa, and the rising influence of China. Interventions: A Life in War and Peace is the story of Annan's remarkable time at the center of the world stage. After forty years of service at the United Nations, Annan shares here his unique experiences during the terrorist attacks of September 11; the American invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan; the war between Israel, Hizbollah, and Lebanon; the brutal conflicts of Somalia, Rwanda, and Bosnia; and the geopolitical transformations following the end of the Cold War. With eloquence and unprecedented candor, Interventions finally reveals Annan's unique role and unparalleled perspective on decades of global politics. The first sub-Saharan African to hold the position of Secretary-General, Annan has led an extraordinary life in his own right. His idealism and personal politics were forged in the Ghanaian independence movement of his adolescence, when all of Africa seemed to be rising as one to demand self-determination. Schooled in Africa, Europe, and the United States, Annan ultimately joined the United Nations in Geneva at the lowest professional level in the still young organization. Annan rose rapidly through the ranks and was by the end of the Cold War prominently placed in the dramatically changing department of peacekeeping operations. His stories of Presidents Clinton and Bush, dictators like Saddam Hussein and Robert Mugabe, and public figures of all stripes contrast powerfully with Annan's descriptions of the courage and decency of ordinary people everywhere struggling for a new and better world. Showing the successes of the United Nations, Annan also reveals the organization's missed opportunities and ongoing challenges-inaction in the Rwanda genocide, continuing violence between Israelis and Palestinians, and the endurance of endemic poverty. Yet Annan's great strength in this book is his ability to embed these tragedies within the context of global politics, demonstrating how, time and again, the nations of the world have retreated from the UN's founding purpose. From the pinnacle of global politics, Annan made it his purpose to put the individual at the center of every mission for peace and prosperity. A personal biography of global statecraft, Annan's Interventions is as much a memoir as a guide to world order-past, present, and future. .

The Signal and the Noise

by Nate Silver

Every time we choose a route to work, decide whether to go on a second date, or set aside money for a rainy day, we are making a prediction about the future. Yet from the global financial crisis to 9/11 to the Fukushima disaster, we often fail to foresee hugely significant events. In The Signal and the Noise, the New York Times' political forecaster and statistics guru Nate Silver explores the art of prediction, revealing how we can all build a better crystal ball. In his quest to distinguish the true signal from a universe of noisy data, Silver visits hundreds of expert forecasters, in fields ranging from the stock market to the poker table, from earthquakes to terrorism. What lies behind their success? And why do so many predictions still fail? By analysing the rare prescient forecasts, and applying a more quantitative lens to everyday life, Silver distils the essential lessons of prediction. We live in an increasingly data-driven world, but it is harder than ever to detect the true patterns amid the noise of information. In this dazzling insider's tour of the world of forecasting, Silver reveals how we can all develop better foresight in our everyday lives.

Plutocrats

by Chrystia Freeland

Forget the 1% - it's time to get to grips with the 0. 1% . . . There has always been some gap between rich and poor, but it has never been wider - and now the rich are getting wealthier at such breakneck speed that the middle classes are being squeezed out. While the wealthiest 10% of Americans, for example, receive half the nation's income, the real money flows even higher up, in the top 0. 1%. As a transglobal class of highly successful professionals, these self-made oligarchs often have more in common with one another than with their own countrymen. But how is this happening, and who are the people making it happen? Chrystia Freeland, acclaimed business journalist and Global Editor-at-Large of Reuters, has unprecedented access to the richest and most successful people on the planet, from Davos to Dubai, and dissects their lives with intelligence, empathy and objectivity. Pacily written and powerfully researched, Plutocrats could not provide a more timely insight into the current state of Capitalism and its most wealthy players. 'A superb piece of reportage . . . a tremendous illumination' (New Statesman on Freeland's previous title, Sale of the Century)

The Generals: American Military Command from World War II to Today

by Thomas E. Ricks

From the #1 bestselling author of Fiasco and The Gamble, an epic history of the decline of American military leadership from World War II to Iraq History has been kind to the American generals of World War II--Marshall, Eisenhower, Patton, and Bradley--and less kind to the generals of the wars that followed. In The Generals, Thomas E. Ricks sets out to explain why that is. In part it is the story of a widening gulf between performance and accountability. During the Second World War, scores of American generals were relieved of command simply for not being good enough. Today, as one American colonel said bitterly during the Iraq War, "As matters stand now, a private who loses a rifle suffers far greater consequences than a general who loses a war. " In The Generals we meet great leaders and suspect ones, generals who rose to the occasion and those who failed themselves and their soldiers. Marshall and Eisenhower cast long shadows over this story, as does the less familiar Marine General O. P. Smith, whose fighting retreat from the Chinese onslaught into Korea in the winter of 1950 snatched a kind of victory from the jaws of annihilation. But Korea also showed the first signs of an army leadership culture that neither punished mediocrity nor particularly rewarded daring. In the Vietnam War, the problem grew worse until, finally, American military leadership bottomed out. The My Lai massacre, Ricks shows us, is the emblematic event of this dark chapter of our history. In the wake of Vietnam a battle for the soul of the U. S. Army was waged with impressive success. It became a transformed institution, reinvigorated from the bottom up. But if the body was highly toned, its head still suffered from familiar problems, resulting in tactically savvy but strategically obtuse leadership that would win battles but end wars badly from the first Iraq War of 1990 through to the present. Ricks has made a close study of America's military leaders for three decades, and in his hands this story resounds with larger meaning: about the transmission of values, about strategic thinking, and about the difference between an organization that learns and one that fails. .

NW: A Novel

by Zadie Smith

North West London comes vividly to life in NW, the new novel by the author of the bestselling White Teeth and Man Booker-shortlisted On Beauty. This is the story of a city. The north-west corner of a city. Here you'll find guests and hosts, those with power and those without it, people who live somewhere special and others who live nowhere at all. And many people in between. Every city is like this. Cheek-by-jowl living. Separate worlds. And then there are the visitations: the rare times a stranger crosses a threshold without permission or warning, causing a disruption in the whole system. Like the April afternoon a woman came to Leah Hanwell's door, seeking help, disturbing the peace, forcing Leah out of her isolation . . . Zadie Smith's brilliant tragi-comic new novel follows four Londoners - Leah, Natalie, Felix and Nathan - as they try to make adult lives outside of Caldwell, the council estate of their childhood. From private houses to public parks, at work and at play, their London is a complicated place, as beautiful as it is brutal, where the thoroughfares hide the back alleys and taking the high road can sometimes lead you to a dead end. Depicting the modern urban zone - familiar to town-dwellers everywhere - Zadie Smith's NW is a quietly devastating novel of encounters, mercurial and vital, like the city itself. Praise for Zadie Smith: 'A tremendous talent' Boyd Tonkin, Independent'A writer of remarkable wit and originality' Observer'One of the handful of novelists writing at present who really matter and who, we may confidently assume, will "last". She is "canonical"' The Times'[It is] impossible not to admire Smith's marriage of humanity, humour and intellect' Irish Times 'An outstanding novelist with the powerful understanding both of what the brain knows and what love knows' ObserverZadie Smith was born in north-west London in 1975. She is the author of the novels White Teeth, The Autograph Man and On Beauty, which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. She is also the author of a collection of essays, Changing My Mind, and the editor of The Book of Other People.

The Patriarch

by David Nasaw

2013 Pulitzer Prize Finalist New York Times Ten Best Books of 2012 "Riveting...The Patriarch is a book hard to put down. " - Christopher Buckley, The New York Times Book Review In this magisterial new work The Patriarch, the celebrated historian David Nasaw tells the full story of Joseph P. Kennedy, the founder of the twentieth century's most famous political dynasty. Nasaw-the only biographer granted unrestricted access to the Joseph P. Kennedy papers in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library-tracks Kennedy's astonishing passage from East Boston outsider to supreme Washington insider. Kennedy's seemingly limitless ambition drove his career to the pinnacles of success as a banker, World War I shipyard manager, Hollywood studio head, broker, Wall Street operator, New Deal presidential adviser, and founding chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission. His astounding fall from grace into ignominy did not come until the years leading up to and following America's entry into the Second World War, when the antiwar position he took as the first Irish American ambassador to London made him the subject of White House ire and popular distaste. The Patriarch is a story not only of one of the twentieth century's wealthiest and most powerful Americans, but also of the family he raised and the children who completed the journey he had begun. Of the many roles Kennedy held, that of father was most dear to him. The tragedies that befell his family marked his final years with unspeakable suffering. The Patriarch looks beyond the popularly held portrait of Kennedy to answer the many questions about his life, times, and legacy that have continued to haunt the historical record. Was Joseph P. Kennedy an appeaser and isolationist, an anti-Semite and a Nazi sympathizer, a stock swindler, a bootlegger, and a colleague of mobsters? What was the nature of his relationship with his wife, Rose? Why did he have his daughter Rosemary lobotomized? Why did he oppose the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the Korean War, and American assistance to the French in Vietnam? What was his relationship to J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI? Did he push his second son into politics and then buy his elections for him? In this pioneering biography, Nasaw draws on never-before-published materials from archives on three continents and interviews with Kennedy family members and friends to tell the life story of a man who participated in the major events of his times: the booms and busts, the Depression and the New Deal, two world wars and a cold war, and the birth of the New Frontier. In studying Kennedy's life, we relive with him the history of the American Century. .

Governing the World

by Mark Mazower

The story of global cooperation between nations and peoples is a tale of dreamers goading us to find common cause in remedying humanity's worst problems. But international institutions have also provided a tool for the powers that be to advance their own interests and stamp their imprint on the world. Mark Mazower's Governing the World tells the epic story of that inevitable and irresolvable tension--the unstable and often surprising alchemy between ideas and power. From the beginning, the willingness of national leaders to cooperate has been spurred by crisis: the book opens in 1815, amid the rubble of the Napoleonic Empire, as the Concert of Europe was assembled with an avowed mission to prevent any single power from dominating the continent and to stamp out revolutionary agitation before it could lead to war. But if the Concert was a response to Napoleon, internationalism was a response to the Concert, and as courts and monarchs disintegrated they were replaced by revolutionaries and bureaucrats. 19th century internationalists included bomb-throwing anarchists and the secret policemen who fought them, Marxist revolutionaries and respectable free marketeers. But they all embraced nationalism, the age's most powerful transformative political creed, and assumed that nationalism and internationalism would go hand in hand. The wars of the twentieth century saw the birth of institutions that enshrined many of those ideals in durable structures of authority, most notably the League of Nations in World War I and the United Nations after World War II. Throughout this history, we see that international institutions are only as strong as the great powers of the moment allow them to be. The League was intended to prop up the British empire. With Washington taking over world leadership from Whitehall, the United Nations became a useful extension of American power. But as Mazower shows us, from the late 1960s on, America lost control over the dialogue and the rise of the independent Third World saw a marked shift away from the United Nations and toward more pliable tools such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. From the 1990s to 2007, Governing the World centers on a new regime of global coordination built upon economic rule-making by central bankers and finance ministers, a regime in which the interests of citizens and workers are trumped by the iron logic of markets. Now, the era of Western dominance of international life is fast coming to an end and a new multi-centered global balance of forces is emerging. We are living in a time of extreme confusion about the purpose and durability of our international institutions. History is not prophecy, but Mark Mazower shows us why the current dialectic between ideals and power politics in the international arena is just another stage in an epic two-hundred-year story. .

Deceived

by Randy Wayne White

Hannah Smith returns in the stunning new adventure in the New York Times-bestselling series from the author of the Doc Ford novels. A twenty-year-old unsolved murder from Florida's pothauling days gets Hannah Smith's attention, but so does a more immediate problem. A private museum devoted solely to the state's earliest settlers and pioneers has been announced, and many of Hannah's friends and neighbors in Sulfur Wells are being pressured to make contributions. The problem is, the whole thing is a scam, and when Hannah sets out to uncover whoever's behind it, she discovers that things are even worse than she thought. The museum scam is a front for a real estate power play, her entire village is in danger of being wiped out-and the forces behind it have no intention of letting anything, or anyone, stand in their way. .

Joy, Guilt, Anger, Love

by Giovanni Frazzetto

Is science ever enough to explain why we feel the way we feel? In this engaging account, renowned neuroscientist Giovanni Frazzetto blends cutting-edge scientific research with personal stories to reveal how our brains generate our emotions. He demonstrates that while modern science has expanded our knowledge, investigating art, literature, and philosophy is equally crucial to unraveling the brain's secrets. What can a brain scan, or our reaction to a Caravaggio painting, reveal about the deep seat of guilt? Can ancient remedies fight sadness more effectively than antidepressants? What can writing poetry tell us about how joy works? Structured in seven chapters encompassing common human emotions-anger, guilt, anxiety, grief, empathy, joy, and love-Joy, Guilt, Anger, Love offers a way of thinking about science and art that will help us to more fully understand ourselves and how we feel. .

Un hijo americano

by Marco Rubio

Pocos políticos han alcanzado una preeminencia a nivel nacional tan rápidamente como Marco Rubio. A sus cuarenta y un años de edad es objeto de un interés genera-lizado y de muchas especulaciones, pero nunca antes había contado en detalle la increíble historia que con todos sus giros y vueltas hizo de él un hijo americano. Esa historia empezó cuando sus padres salieron de Cuba en 1956. Una vez que Fidel Castro y su comunismo se tomaron el poder, Mario y Oria Rubio jamás pudieron regresar a su tierra natal. Pero adoptaron su nuevo país y enseñaron a sus hijos a agradecerle sus extraordinarias oportunidades. Cada sacrificio que hicieron durante todos esos años y los trabajos que pasaron en humildes oficios en Miami y Las Vegas, fue por sus hijos. De niño, Rubio pasaba horas y horas con su abuelo analizando la historia y los sucesos del momento. A "Papá" le fascinaba ser cubano, pero también le fascinaban los Estados Unidos por ser un modelo de libertad para los pueblos oprimidos de todo el mundo. Como dice Rubio: "Mi abuelo no pensaba que los Estados Unidos es un país excepcional por haberlo leído en un libro. Él lo experi­mentó y lo vio con sus propios ojos". Destrozado por la muerte de su abuelo, Rubio empezó a obtener malas calificaciones al mismo tiempo que le costaba trabajo encajar en la escuela secundaria, donde algunos de sus condiscípulos lo ridiculizaban por ser "demasiado americano". Sin embargo, impulsado por el fútbol americano y la política, sus dos grandes pasiones, ya en la universidad y en la escuela de leyes se dedicó a estudiar en serio. Habiendo jugado fútbol americano en una pequeña universidad en Missouri, regresó a la Florida para estudiar en el Santa Fe Community College y la Universidad de Florida. Obtuvo su título de abogado en la Universidad de Miami y entró a trabajar en un bufete de abogados con un salario excelente, que permitió que su padre se retirara. Siendo un joven abogado, se postuló como candidato para comisionado de la ciudad de West Miami, cargo que lo condujo a la Cámara de Representantes. En solo seis años llegó a ser Presidente de la Cámara y se convirtió en un destacado abanderado de la libre empresa, así como de la lucha por tener mejores escuelas, un gobierno constitu­cional y un sistema tributario más justo y simplificado. Descubrió entonces que podía relacionarse con la gente más allá de las barreras partidistas y mantener su respeto por los valores conservadores tradicionales. Su campaña para el Senado de los Estados Unidos con­tra Charlie Crist, para ese entonces popular gobernador de la Florida, se inició como una posibilidad muy remota. Sin dejarse desanimar, ni por las cifras de las primeras encues­tas ni por el tiempo que debió permanecer alejado de su esposa e hijos, Rubio recorrió todo el estado con su mensaje de empoderamiento y optimismo. Y venció a Crist, tanto en la elección primaria como en una dramática elección general tripartita, después de que Crist abandonara el Gran Partido Republicano para postularse como independiente. Ahora, Rubio habla en los estrados nacionales sobre los retos que afrontamos y ese futuro mejor que podremos alcanzar si volvemos a nuestros principios fundadores. En sus propias palabras: "El conservatismo no busca retrasar a la gente. El conservatismo busca actualizar a la gente". Con esa visión, igual que con la historia de su familia, Rubio ha demonstrado que el Sueño Americano aún tiene vigencia para aquellos que luchan por alcanzarlo. Few politicians have risen to national prominence as quickly as Marco Rubio. At age forty-one he''s the subject of widespread interest and speculation. But he has never before told the full story of his unlikely journey, with all the twists and turns that made him an American son. That journey began when his parents first left Cuba in 1956. After Fidel Castro solidified his Communist grip on power, Mario and Oria Rubio could never again return to their homeland. But they embraced their new country and taught their children to appreciate its unique opportu...

Stranded

by Jeff Probst

A New York Times Bestseller! As seen on The Today Show, Rachael Ray, and Kelly and Michael. From the Emmy-Award winning host of Survivor, Jeff Probst, with Middle School: The Worst Years of My Life co-author, Chris Tebbetts, comes a brand new family adventure series! A family vacation becomes a game of survival! It was supposed to be a vacation--and a chance to get to know each other better. But when a massive storm sets in without warning, four kids are shipwrecked alone on a rocky jungle island in the middle of the South Pacific. No adults. No instructions. Nobody to rely on but themselves. Can they make it home alive? A week ago, the biggest challenge Vanessa, Buzz, Carter, and Jane had was learning to live as a new blended family. Now the four siblings must find a way to work together if they're going to make it off the island. But first they've got to learn to survive one another. .

Skin

by Max Allan Collins Mickey Spillane

The saga of Dark Angel continues! Someone is killing normal humans in the fog-enshrouded city of Seattle. The murders are brutal and grisly, but inside Terminal City they barely cause a ripple of concern. The transgenics who live there have problems of their own. In an area under siege by the oppressive arm of the police, the transgenics must protect their fledgling colony against the outside world--a world that eyes them with contempt and suspicion . . . and will do anything to be rid of them. As the killings escalate, Joshua comes to Max with a dire suspicion: the killer may be one of their own. Tensions are high between normal humans and transgenics, and many inside the protected City would just as soon let the humans fend for themselves. Yet Max and her inner circle know they must investigate the crimes and stop the bloodshed. Doing nothing would simply give the normals more reasons to hate. But what they discover will shock even the most jaded among them--and expose a sinister agenda that leads to an old, nefarious foe. . . .

I Want to Kill the Dog

by Richard M. Cohen

A hilarious book by Richard M. Cohen, the New York Times bestselling author of Blindsided and Strong at the Broken Places, about living with his wife, Meredith Vieira, and her band of difficult dogs. "Has a couple ever gone to war or a spouse moved to another country because a pet came between them? Have two people other than my wife and me ever had such opposing feelings when it comes to domestic animals?" So wonders Richard M. Cohen, who has endured the beasts his wife, Meredith Vieira, has brought into the house to enrich their lives. Despite her unshakable affection for these furry creatures, the various animals have destroyed the serenity of a once calm household. Friends watch in stunned silence as the family frantically struggles to keep peace in this lawless land. Delivery people have fled in fear. Guests have cowered or simply laughed at the hideous shrieks, the current mutt's stab at intimidation. Then there are the cats that think they are ferocious jungle creatures. Weary of having animals run the show, Richard is fed up. These animals are destroying a home, and the life of one simple soul who seeks only peace and quiet. The King has been overthrown. The Queen and her court have taken over. That would be Meredith and her minions. I Want to Kill the Dog is more than a countercultural ode to those weary of the pet pedestal. It is a portrait of a marriage and of the redemptive power of humor and family when banishing the beast is not an option. .

Can't Buy Me Like

by Bob Garfield

Today's brands face an apparent choice between two evils: continue betting on their increasingly ineffective advertising or put blind faith in the supposedly mystical power of social media, where "likes" stand in for transactions and a mass audience is maddeningly elusive. There has to be a better way . . . As Lennon and McCartney wrote a half century ago, money can't buy you love. But in today's world, where people have become desensi­tized-even disillusioned-by ad campaigns and marketing slogans, that maxim needs an update: Money can't even buy you like. That's because we've entered the "Relationship Era," where the only path for businesses seeking long-term success is to create authentic customer relationships. Not through hip social media promo­tions, viral videos or blizzards of micro-targeted online ads. Those tactics, which simply disguise old ways of thinking with new technology, just don't work in the long run. So what does work in this bewildering new era? Where do "authentic customer relationships" come from? The answers will make some leaders sigh with relief while others rip their hair out: Honesty. Transparency. Shared values. A purpose beyond profit. Sure you still need a high-quality product or service to offer, but that's not enough. Now that people can easily discover everything that's ever been said about your brand, you can't manipu­late, seduce, persuade, flatter or entertain them into loyalty. You have to treat them like flesh-and-blood human beings, not abstract consumers or data points on a spreadsheet. It may sound like the woo-woo language of self-help books and inspirational wall posters. But as Garfield and Levy show in this book, it's the deadly serious reality of business in the 2010s. It's why General Motors abandoned its $10 million annual budget for Facebook ads, and why some brands have hurt themselves badly on social media by nagging, interrupting, abusing and generally ticking off their customers. The good news is that some companies have already embraced the Relationship Era and are enjoying consistent growth and profits while spending substantially less on marketing than their competitors. The authors show what we can learn from case studies such as . . . Patagonia, a clothing company with a passion for environmentalism, which solidified its customer relationships by urging people NOT to buy one of its jackets. Panera Bread, which doubled per-store sales by focusing on ways to create a welcoming environ­ment while spending just 1 percent of sales on advertising. Secret, the women's antiperspirant brand, which gained significant share by focusing on its com­mitment to strong women. Krispy Kreme, which has built a near cult of loyal Facebook and Twitter fans, all but obliterating the need for paid advertising. Blending powerful new research, fascinating exam­ples and practical advice, Garfield and Levy show how any company can thrive in the Relationship Era. .

The Half-Life of Facts: Why Everything We Know Has an Expiration Date

by Samuel Arbesman

New insights from the science of science Facts change all the time. Smoking has gone from doctor recommended to deadly. We used to think the Earth was the center of the universe and that Pluto was a planet. For decades, we were convinced that the brontosaurus was a real dinosaur. In short, what we know about the world is constantly changing. But it turns out there's an order to the state of knowledge, an explanation for how we know what we know. Samuel Arbesman is an expert in the field of scientometrics-literally the science of science. Knowl­edge in most fields evolves systematically and predict­ably, and this evolution unfolds in a fascinating way that can have a powerful impact on our lives. Doctors with a rough idea of when their knowl­edge is likely to expire can be better equipped to keep up with the latest research. Companies and govern­ments that understand how long new discoveries take to develop can improve decisions about allocating resources. And by tracing how and when language changes, each of us can better bridge gen­erational gaps in slang and dialect. Just as we know that a chunk of uranium can break down in a measurable amount of time-a radioactive half-life-so too any given field's change in knowledge can be measured concretely. We can know when facts in aggregate are obsolete, the rate at which new facts are created, and even how facts spread. Arbesman takes us through a wide variety of fields, including those that change quickly, over the course of a few years, or over the span of centuries. He shows that much of what we know consists of "mesofacts"-facts that change at a middle timescale, often over a single human lifetime. Throughout, he of­fers intriguing examples about the face of knowledge: what English majors can learn from a statistical analysis of The Canterbury Tales, why it's so hard to measure a mountain, and why so many parents still tell kids to eat their spinach because it's rich in iron. The Half-life of Facts is a riveting journey into the counterintuitive fabric of knowledge. It can help us find new ways to measure the world while accepting the limits of how much we can know with certainty. .

Extreme Couponing: Learn How to be a Savvy Shopper and Save Money...One Coupon at a Time

by Beth Adelman Joni Meyer-Crothers

In today's economy, being money savvy is a necessity. For most American households cutting back on the things they love has become harder and harder to bear. But there are ways to get what you want at a fraction of the cost--if not free. With this book, extreme couponing expert Joni Meyer-Crothers explains precisely how she has managed to save thousands by clipping coupons, using them wisely and never paying full retail price for any product. She reveals what basic items you should never pay for (toothpaste, toothbrushes, razors, pasta, etc. ), and teaches readers techniques to obtain coupons that do not cost a penny and turn them around to save big on groceries, cleaning items, hygienic supplies, and many other household products. Learn the basics of couponing, maximizing your savings, and thinking outside of the box when it comes to how you shop. With Extreme Couponing, there's no reason to pay full price for the things you need in life. .

Man Up

by Carlos Andres Gomez

Inspired by the award-winning poet and actor's acclaimed one-man play, a powerful coming-of-age memoir that reimagines masculinity for the twenty-first-century male. Award-winning poet, actor, and writer Carlos Andrés Gómez is a supremely gifted storyteller with a captivating voice whose power resonates equally on the live stage and on the page. In one of his most moving spoken-word poems, Gómez recounts a confrontation he once had after accidentally bumping into another man at a club. Just as they were about to fight, Gómez experienced an unexplainable surge of emotion that made his eyes well up with tears. Everyone at the scene jumped back, as if crying, or showing vulnerability, was the most insane thing that Gómez could possibly have done. Like many men in our society, Gómez grew up believing that he had to be ready to fight at all times, treat women as objects, and close off his emotional self. It wasn't until he discovered acting that he began to see the true cost of squelching one's emotions-and how aggression dominates everything that young males are taught. Statistics on graduation rates, employment, and teen and young-adult suicide make it clear that the young males in our society are at a crisis point, but Gómez seeks to reverse these ominous trends by sharing the lessons that he has learned. Like Hill Harper's Letters to a Young Brother, Man Up will be an agent for positive change, galvanizing men-but also mothers, girlfriends, wives, and sisters-to rethink and reimagine the way all men interact with women, deal with violence, handle fear, and express emotion. .

Unstoppable

by Anthony Robles

The powerful and inspiring story of an all-American wrestler who defied the odds Anthony Robles is a three-time all-American wrestler, the 2011 NCAA National Wrestling Champion, and a Nike-sponsored athlete. He was also born without his right leg. Doctors could not explain to his mother, Judy, what led to the birth defect, but at the age of five, the one-legged toddler scaled a fifty-foot pole unassisted. From that moment on, Judy knew without a doubt that her son would be unstoppable. When Anthony first began wrestling in high school, he was the smallest kid on the team and finished the year in last place. Yet Anthony's family and coaches supported his decision to continue, and he completed his junior and senior years with a 96-0 record to become a two-time Arizona State champion. In college, Anthony had to prove all over again that he could excel. Despite hardships on and off the mat--including the temptation to quit school and get a job to help his family when they lost their home to foreclosure--Anthony focused his determination and became a champion once again. Since winning the national championship in March 2011, Anthony has become a nationally recognized role model to kids and adults alike. But Unstoppable is not just an exciting sports memoir or an inspirational tale of living with a disability. It is also the story of one man whose spirit and unyielding resolve remind us all that we have the power to conquer adversity--in whatever form. .

Mistrial

by Mark Geragos

A searing and entertaining manifesto on the ills of the criminal justice system from two of America's most prominent defense attorneys. From the rise of the Internet and the 24-hour news cycle to the television ratings bonanza of the O. J. Simpson trial, a perfect storm of media coverage has given the public an unprecedented look inside the courtroom, kicking off popular courtroom shows and TV legal commentary that further illuminate how the criminal justice system operates. Or has it? In Mistrial, Mark Geragos and Pat Harris debunk the myths of judges as Solomon-like figures, jurors as impartial arbiters of the truth, and prosecutors as super-ethical heroes. Mistrial draws the curtain on the court's ugly realities-from stealth jurors who secretly swing for a conviction, to cops who regularly lie on the witness stand, to defense attorneys terrified of going to trial. Ultimately, the authors question whether a justice system model drawn up two centuries ago before blogs and television is still viable today. In the aftermath of recent high-profile cases, the flaws in America's justice system are more glaring than ever. Geragos and Harris are legal experts and prominent criminal defense attorneys who have worked on everything from celebrity media-circuses-having represented clients like Michael Jackson, Winona Ryder, Scott Peterson, Chris Brown, Susan MacDougal, and Gary Condit-to equally compelling cases defending individuals desperate to avoid the spotlight. Shining unprecedented light on what really goes on in the courtroom, Mistrial is an enjoyable, fun look at a system that rarely lets you see behind the scenes. .

It's Complicated (But It Doesn't Have to Be)

by Paul Carrick Brunson

The "Modern Day Matchmaker" presents a refreshingly optimistic and plainspoken dating guide to finding romance--both on- and off-line. Finding and keeping a mate has never been harder. New rules are needed to navigate the complicated and changing modern-love landscape. If someone wants to find "the one," what are the guidelines he or she needs to know, now that online dating and Google-searching a prospective love interest are the norm? Happily married for ten years, Paul Carrick Brunson is a husband, a father, and a rising star in the matchmaking world. In It's Complicated (But It Doesn't Have to Be), Brunson tackles relevant questions such as: Is marriage right for my personality type? Do the rules of chivalry still apply? How can I date more than one person without hurt feelings? What is the best mode of communication (text messages, phone, e-mail, etc. ) for asking someone out? With an appealing mix of humor, candor, and real-world examples, It's Complicated (But It Doesn't Have to Be) is a breath of fresh air in the dating guide category, offering a message of eternal optimism from a man who believes in true love--and practices what he preaches. .

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