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Showing 40,051 through 40,075 of 72,587 results

Consciousness: A User's Guide

by Adam Zeman

This engaging and readable book provides an introduction to consciousness that does justice both to the science and to the philosophy of consciousness, that is, the mechanics of the mind and the experience of awareness. The book opens with a general discussion of the brain and of consciousness itself. Then, exploring the areas of brain science most likely to illuminate the basis of awareness, Zeman focuses on the science of sleep and waking and on the science of vision. He describes healthy states and disorders--epilepsy, narcolepsy, blindsight and hallucinations after stroke--that provide insights into the capacity for consciousness and into its contents. And he tracks the evolution of the brain, the human species, and human culture and surveys the main current scientific theories of awareness, pioneering attempts to explain how the brain gives rise to experience. Zeman concludes by examining philosophical arguments about the nature of consciousness. A practicing neurologist, he animates his text with examples from the behavioral and neurological disorders of his patients and from the expanding mental worlds of young children, including his own. His book is an accessible and enlightening explanation of why we are conscious.

Electoral Realignments: A Critique of an American Genre

by David R. Mayhew

One of our most influential political scientists shows why realignment theory does not hold up under scrutiny and calls for new ways of thinking about election issues.

Mammon's Music: Literature and Economics in the Age of Milton

by Blair Hoxby

This book explores what the commercial revolution of the seventeenth century meant to the greatest poet of the era, John Milton, and the broader literary tradition in which he worked. New economic ideas influenced a wide range of Milton's most famous writings as he and other authors engaged with the economic discourse of the age, reimagining ideas about self, community, and empire.

Italian Tales: An Anthology of Contemporary Italian Fiction

by Massimo Riva

This anthology serves as a literary map to guide readers through the varied geography of contemporary Italian fiction. Massimo Riva has gathered English-language translations of short stories and excerpts from novels that were originally published in Italian between 1975 and 2001. As an expression of a communal contemporary condition, these narratives suggest a new sensibility and a new way of seeing, exploring, and inhabiting the world, in writing. Riva provides a comprehensive introduction to Italian literary trends of the past twenty years. Each selection is preceded by a short introduction and biography of the writer. For English-language readers who are familiar with the work of Italo Calvino and Umberto Eco, this collection presents an opportunity to acquaint themselves with the work of other important contemporary Italian writers of fiction.

Intuition: Its Powers and Perils

by David G. Myers

A professor of psychology presents an engaging and accessible book that shows that, while intuition can provide useful and often amazing insights, it can also be dangerously misleading. Drawing on recent research, Myers discusses the powers and perils of intuition.

The Metabolism Miracle

by Diane Kress

Do you keep gaining weight, despite your efforts to diet? Do the pounds accumulate around your tummy? Do you feel tired, irritable, and unable to focus? If you answered "yes" to any of the above, you may be one of the millions who have Metabolism B, an inherited condition that causes your body to overprocess carbohydrate foods into excess body fat. There is a reason that some people can eat all they want (and seemingly never gain a pound), while the rest of us fret over every carb. Diane Kress, a registered dietitian and weight-loss specialist, has helped thousands with Metabolism B lose weight--and keep it off--with her revolutionary, scientifically based program. Now she shares its secrets here. Among the many life-changing elements ofThe Metabolism Miracle, you will discover: * The reason why cookie-cutter approaches to dieting (subtracting calories burned from calories consumed)cannotwork for those with Metabolism B * The tools to lose weight and reprogram your metabolismpermanently * A foolproof method to improve your cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugar * The return of your energy, focus, and sense of well-being * Sample menus to help you take it one day at a time * Delicious recipes (including vegan) tailored to match each step * An active lifestyle plan to maintain your newfound body weight. As someone who struggled with Metabolism B for years, Diane Kress knows firsthand the frustration of diets that don't work. Based on the latest research, her own experience, and the experiences of her clients, she has developed this groundbreaking plan to help you take back your life--starting today.

The First Year

by Shepard Jules E. Dowler

Using coded videotapes of fifty-eight mother/infant pairs at infant ages of 2 1/2 , 5, 7 1/2 , and 22 months, the authors examined the complex process of emotional development. Their report identifies the features of expressive behavior and attempts correlation with maternal behavior and other factors. No index. Annotation(c) 2003 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Samuel Johnson: The Struggle

by Jeffrey Meyers

Samuel Johnson is no doubt a giant among literary giants: poet and essayist, moralist and conversationalist, and dictionary creator. But Meyers (author and Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature) takes readers past Johnson's intellect to reveal him as a man filled with contradiction who suffered from severe depression, physical and mental ailments, and a mercurial personality. The author took advantage of archives, letters, and manuscripts as well as recently uncovered information about his physical deformities and their effects on his life. The book is both interesting and lively reading. Annotation c2010 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Valkyrie: An Insider's Account of the Plot to Kill Hitler

by Hans Bernd Gisevius

When on July 20, 1944, a bomb--boldly placed inside Hitler's headquarters by Colonel Count Claus von Stauffenberg-- exploded without killing the Führer, the subsequent coup d'état against the Third Reich collapsed. The conspirators were summarily shot or condemned in show trials and sadistically hanged. One of the few survivors of the conspiracy was Hans Bernd Gisevius, who had used his positions in the Gestapo and the Abwehr (military intelligence) to further the anti-Nazi plot. Valkyrie, an abridgment of Gisevius's classic insider's account To the Bitter End, is an intimate memoir as riveting as it is exceptional.

First in Peace: How George Washington Set the Course for America

by Conor Cruise O'Brien

This is the last in a series of books by Irish intellectual O'Brien arguing that the French Revolution was not an extension of the principles of the American Revolution, but a negation of those principles. It examines the presidency of George Washington, focusing on the dissension between Washington and Jefferson regarding the extremist tactics of the French Revolution. An introduction by Christopher Hitchens, a commentator representing the opposite end of the political spectrum from O'Brien, puts the interpretation into the larger context of O'Brien's work on the importance of rational discourse over ideology. O'Brien was a diplomat and scholar. Annotation c2010 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Less than Crazy

by Karla Dougherty

Bipolar II is a form of bipolar disorder in which a person, when in a manic cycle, is crippled by anxiety, irritability, and highs just intense enough to be embarrassing. Instead of being the life of the party, someone with Bipolar II might be too nervous to go to the party at all. And, unlike the Bipolar I sufferer who may attempt suicide in a depressive cycle, the Bipolar II might be incapacitated by guilt over an imaginary crime. In Less than Crazy, health writer and Bipolar II sufferer Karla Dougherty shares her story, presenting the first patient-expert's guide to recognizing and living well with this condition. Covering both adults and children, this accessible, all-in-one resource includes information on diagnosis, conditions that may mimic Bipolar II, and treatments.

Comfortably Numb

by Mark Blake

Mark Blake draws on his own interviews with band members as well as the group's friends, road crew, musical contemporaries, former housemates, and university colleagues to produce a riveting history of one of the biggest rock bands of all time. We follow Pink Floyd from the early psychedelic nights at UFO, to the stadium-rock and concept-album zenith of the seventies, to the acrimonious schisms of the late '80s and '90s. Along the way there are fascinating new revelations about Syd Barrett's chaotic life at the time ofPiper at the Gates of Dawn, the band's painstaking and Byzantine recording sessions at Abbey Road, and the fractious negotiations to bring about their fragile, tantalizing reunion in Hyde Park. Meticulous, exacting, and ambitious as any Pink Floyd album,Comfortably Numbis the definitive account of this most adventurous-and most English-rock band.

Forgotten Patriots

by Edwin G. Burrows

Between 1775 and 1783, some 200,000 Americans took up arms against the British Crown. Just over 6,800 of those men died in battle. About 25,000 became prisoners of war, most of them confined in New York City under conditions so atrocious that they perished by the thousands. Evidence suggests that at least 17,500 Americans may have died in these prisons-more than twice the number to die on the battlefield. It was in New York, not Boston or Philadelphia, where most Americans gave their lives for the cause of independence. New York City became the jailhouse of the American Revolution because it was the principal base of the Crown's military operations. Beginning with the bumper crop of American captives taken during the 1776 invasion of New York, captured Americans were stuffed into a hastily assembled collection of public buildings, sugar houses, and prison ships. The prisoners were shockingly overcrowded and chronically underfed-those who escaped alive told of comrades so hungry they ate their own clothes and shoes. Despite the extraordinary number of lives lost,Forgotten Patriotsis the first-ever account of what took place in these hell-holes. The result is a unique perspective on the Revolutionary War as well as a sobering commentary on how Americans have remembered our struggle for independence-and how much we have forgotten.

Richard M. Nixon: A Life in Full

by Conrad Black

From the late 1940s to the mid-1970s, Richard Nixon was a polarizing figure in American politics, admired for his intelligence, savvy, and strategic skill, and reviled for his shady manner and cutthroat tactics. Conrad Black, whose epic biography of FDR was widely acclaimed as a masterpiece, now separates the good in Nixon-his foreign initiatives, some of his domestic policies, and his firm political hand-from the sinister, in a book likely to generate enormous attention and controversy. Black believes the hounding of Nixon from office was partly political retribution from a lifetime's worth of enemies and Nixon's misplaced loyalty to unworthy subordinates, and not clearly the consequence of crimes in which he participated. Conrad Black's own recent legal travails, though hardly comparable, have undoubtedly given him an unusual insight into the pressures faced by Nixon in his last two years as president and the first few years of his retirement.

How to Write Like Chekhov

by Anton Chekhov Piero Brunello Lena Lencek

Maxim Gorky said that no one understood "the tragedy of life's trivialities" as clearly as Anton Chekhov, widely considered the father of the modern short story and the modern play. Chekhov's singular ability to speak volumes with a single, impeccably chosen word, mesh comedy and pathos, and capture life's basic sadness as he entertains us, are why so many aspire to emulate him. How to Write Like Chekhov meticulously cherry-picks from Chekhov's plays, stories, and letters to his publisher, brother, and friends, offering suggestions and observations on subjects including plot and characters (and their names), descriptions and dialogue, and what to emphasize and avoid. This is a uniquely clear roadmap to Chekhov's intelligence and artistic expertise and an essential addition to the writing-guide shelf.

A Great Idea at the Time

by Alex Beam

Today the classics of the western canon, written by the proverbial "dead white men," are cannon fodder in the culture wars. But in the 1950s and 1960s, they were a pop culture phenomenon. The Great Books of Western Civilization, fifty-four volumes chosen by intellectuals at the University of Chicago, began as an educational movement, and evolved into a successful marketing idea. Why did a million American households buy books by Hippocrates and Nicomachus from door-to-door salesmen? And how and why did the great books fall out of fashion? In A Great Idea at the Time Alex Beam explores the Great Books mania, in an entertaining and strangely poignant portrait of American popular culture on the threshold of the television age. Populated with memorable characters, A Great Idea at the Time will leave readers asking themselves: Have I read Lucretius's De Rerum Natura lately? If not, why not?

The Sun and the Moon

by Matthew Goodman

On August 26, 1835, a fledgling newspaper called the Sun brought to New York the first accounts of remarkable lunar discoveries. A series of six articles reported the existence of life on the moon-including unicorns, beavers that walked on their hind legs, and four-foot-tall flying man-bats. In a matter of weeks it was the most broadly circulated newspaper story of the era, and the Sun, a working-class upstart, became the most widely read paper in the world. An exhilarating narrative history of a divided city on the cusp of greatness, and tale of a crew of writers, editors, and charlatans who stumbled on a new kind of journalism, The Sun and the Moon tells the surprisingly true story of the penny papers that made America a nation of newspaper readers.

Passing Game

by Murray Greenberg

Benny Friedman, the son of working class immigrants in Cleveland's Jewish ghetto, arrived at the University of Michigan and transformed the game of football forever. At the time, in the 1920s, football was a dull, grinding running game, and the forward pass was a desperation measure. Benny would change all of that. In Ann Arbor, the rookie quarterback's passing abilities so eclipsed those of other players that legendary coach Fielding Yost came back from retirement to coach him. The other college teams had no answer for Friedman's passing attack. He then went pro-an unpopular decision at a time when the NFL was the poor stepchild to college football-and was equally sensational, eventually signing with the New York Giants for an unprecedented $10,000, bringing fans and attention to the fledgling NFL. Passing Gamerediscovers this little-known sports hero and tells the story of Friedman's evolution from upstart to American celebrity, in a vivid narrative that will delight and enlighten football fans of all ages.

Backstabbing for Beginners

by Michael Soussan

The year is 1997, Michael Soussan, a fresh-faced young graduate takes up a new job at the U. N. 's Oil-for-Food Program, the largest humanitarian operation in the organization's history. His mission is to help Iraqi civilians survive the devastating impact of economic sanctions that were imposed following the 1990 invasion of Kuwait. As a gaffe-prone novice in a world of sensitive taboos, Soussan struggles to negotiate the increasing paranoia of his incomprehensible boss and the inner workings of one of the world's notoriously complex bureaucracies. But as he learns more about the vast sums of money flowing through the program, it becomes clear that all is not what it seems. Soussan becomes aware that Saddam Hussein is extracting illegal kickbacks, a discovery that sets him on a collision course with the organization's leadership. On March 8, 2004, in a Wall Street Journal op-ed editorial, Soussan becomes the first insider to call for "an independent investigation" of the U. N. 's dealings with Saddam Hussein. One week later, a humiliated Kofi Annan appointed Paul Volcker to lead a team of sixty international investigators, whose findings resulted in hundreds of prosecutions in multiple countries, many of which are still ongoing. Backstabbing for Beginners is at once a witty tale of one man's political coming of age, and a stinging indictment of the hypocrisy that prevailed at the heart of one of the world's most idealistic institutions.

Rock, Paper, Scissors

by Len Fisher

Praised byEntertainment Weeklyas "the man who put the fizz into physics," Dr. Len Fisher turns his attention to the science of cooperation in his lively and thought-provoking book. Fisher shows how the modern science of game theory has helped biologists to understand the evolution of cooperation in nature, and investigates how we might apply those lessons to our own society. In a series of experiments that take him from the polite confines of an English dinner party to crowded supermarkets, congested Indian roads, and the wilds of outback Australia, not to mention baseball strategies and the intricacies of quantum mechanics, Fisher sheds light on the problem of global cooperation. The outcomes are sometimes hilarious, sometimes alarming, but always revealing. A witty romp through a serious science,Rock, Paper, Scissorswill both teach and delight anyone interested in what it what it takes to get people to work together.

When a Crocodile Eats the Sun: A Memoir of Africa

by Peter Godwin

After his father's heart attack in 1984, Peter Godwin began a series of pilgrimages back to Zimbabwe, the land of his birth, from Manhattan, where he now lives. On these frequent visits to check on his elderly parents, he bore witness to Zimbabwe's dramatic spiral downwards into the jaws of violent chaos, presided over by an increasingly enraged dictator. And yet long after their comfortable lifestyle had been shattered and millions were fleeing, his parents refuse to leave, steadfast in their allegiance to the failed state that has been their adopted home for 50 years. Then Godwin discovered a shocking family secret that helped explain their loyalty. Africa was his father's sanctuary from another identity, another world. WHEN A CROCODILE EATS THE SUN is a stirring memoir of the disintegration of a family set against the collapse of a country. But it is also a vivid portrait of the profound strength of the human spirit and the enduring power of love. A Readers Guide is included, which contains an interview with the author and discussion questions.

The Supremes

by Mark Ribowsky

Drawing on intimate recollections from friends, family, and Motown contemporaries, Mark Ribowsky charts the Supremes' meteoric rise and bitter disintegration. He sheds light on Diana Ross's relationship with Berry Gordy and her cutthroat rise to top billing in the group, as well as Florence Ballard's corresponding decline. He also takes us inside the studio, examining how timeless classics were conceived and recorded on the Motown "assembly line," and considers the place of Motown in an era of cultural upheaval, when not being "black enough" became a fierce denunciation within the black music industry. Deftly combining personal testimony, history, and expert analysis, Ribowsky not only tells the full, heartbreaking story of the Supremes, but shows why Gordy's revolutionary concept of "blacks singing white" was essential to the modern evolution of music.

The Agony and the Agony

by Betty Londergan

"Mom, you woke me up when I specifically asked you not to!" "Why did you turn here when you know this is the slowest possible way to go?" "I cannot believe you made teriyaki chicken again! Is that the only freaking thing you know how to make?" Sound familiar?The Agony and the Agony is a bitingly honest guide to what it takes (out of you) to raise a teen in today's permissive, high-anxiety culture. This book is packed with hilarious stories, tips from former teens, parental traps to avoid, and advice on how not to handle each phase. For every parent who's wondered, "What the hell is wrong with my kid?" Londergan provides empathy and wisdom from the trenches, as well as hope for a gainfully employed future.

Abraham Lincoln

by Brian Lamb Susan Swain C-Span

In a handsome, gift-quality volume celebrating the 200th anniversary of Lincoln's birth, America's top Lincoln historians offer their diverse perspectives on the life and legacy of America's sixteenth president. Spanning Lincoln's life-from his early career as a Springfield lawyer, to his presidential reign during one of America's most troubled historical periods, to his assassination in 1865-these essays, developed from original C-SPAN interviews, provide a compelling, composite portrait of Lincoln, one that offers up new stories and fresh insights on a defining leader. Edited by C-SPAN's Brian Lamb and Susan Swain, illustrated with Lamb's photographs of Lincoln landmarks, and promoted throughout the year on C-SPAN,Abraham Lincolnis a wonderful compendium of information and deeply-informed analysis that deserves a prominent place on every bookshelf.

Too Close to the Sun

by Curtis Roosevelt

Curtis Roosevelt was three when he and his sister, Eleanor, arrived at the White House soon after their grandfather's inauguration. The country's "First Grandchildren," a pint-sized double act, they were known to the media as "Sistie and Buzzie. " In this rich memoir, Roosevelt brings us into "the goldfish bowl," as his family called it-that glare of public scrutiny to which all presidential households must submit. He recounts his misadventures as a hapless kid in an unforgivably formal setting and describes his role as a tiny planet circling the dual suns of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. Blending self-abasement, humor, awe and affection,Too Close to the Sunis an intimate portrait of two of the most influential and inspirational figures in modern American history-and a thoughtful exploration of the emotional impact of growing up in their irresistible aura.

Showing 40,051 through 40,075 of 72,587 results

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