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Motherless Daughters

by Hope Edelman

An instant bestseller in both hardcover and paperback, Hope Edelman'sMotherless Daughtersexplores the myriad ways that losing a mother can affect almost every aspect and passage of a woman's life. First published a decade ago, it is still the book that motherless daughters of all ages look to for understanding and comfort and that they press into each other's hands. Building on interviews with hundreds of mother- loss survivors, this life-affirming book is now newly expanded to reflect the author's personal experience with the continued legacy of mother loss; now married and a mother of young children herself, Edelman better understands how the effects of mother loss change over time and in light of new relationships. A work of stunning courage and honesty,Motherless Daughtersis a must read for the millions of women whose mothers have gone, but whose need for healing, mourning, and mothering remains. It is a timeless classic.

Procrastination: Why You Do It, What to Do About It Now

by Jane B. Burka

Based on years of counseling, psychologists Jane B. Burka and Lenora M. Yuen offer a probing, sensitive, and sometimes humorous look at the problem that troubles everyone. Revealing the reasons we put off tasks-fears of failure, success, control, separation, and attachment-the authors outline a practical, tested program to overcome procrastination. Candid and understanding,Procrastinationis a must-have today for anyone who puts everything off until tomorrow.

Belly Laughs

by Jenny Mccarthy

Oh, the joys of pregnancy! There's the gassiness, constipation, queasiness, and exhaustion, the forgetfulness, crankiness, and the constant worry. Of course, no woman is spared the discomforts and humiliations of pregnancy, but most are too polite to complain or too embarrassed to talk about them. Not Jenny McCarthy! In theNew York Timesbest-sellingBelly Laughs, actress and new mother Jenny McCarthy reveals the naked truth about the tremendous joys, the excruciating pains, and the unseemly disfigurement that go along with pregnancy. Never shy, frequently crude, and always laugh-out-loud funny, McCarthy covers it all in the grittiest of girlfriend detail. From morning sickness and hormonal rage, to hemorrhoids, pregnant sex, and the torture and sweet relief that is delivery,Belly Laughsis must-read comic relief for anyone who is pregnant, who has ever been pregnant, is trying to get pregnant, or, indeed, has ever been born!

Jacob's Cane

by Elisa New

Drawn to an image of her great-grandfather's ornately carved cane, scholar Elisa New embarked on a journey to discover the origins of her precious family heirloom. Treading back across the paths of her ancestors, she travels from Baltimore to the Baltic to London in order to find and understand an immigrant world profoundly affected by modern German culture, from the Enlightenment through the Holocaust. Deeply ambitious in its narrative sweep, Jacob's Cane captures the rich texture of life on several continents as New's family searches to establish itself in the tobacco trade. A fascinating history of one family's story of progress, innovation, and struggle, Jacob's Cane will change the way we think about the Jewish American experience.

America's Unwritten Constitution

by Akhil Reed Amar

Despite its venerated place atop American law and politics, our written Constitution does not enumerate all of the rules and rights, principles and procedures that actually govern modern America. The document makes no explicit mention of cherished concepts like the separation of powers and the rule of law. On some issues, the plain meaning of the text misleads. For example, the text seems to say that the vice president presides over his own impeachment trial-but surely this cannot beright. As esteemed legal scholar Akhil Reed Amar explains inAmerica's Unwritten Constitution, the solution to many constitutional puzzles lies not solely within the written document, but beyond it-in the vast trove of values, precedents, and practices that complement and complete the terse text. In this sequel toAmerica's Constitution: A Biography, Amar takes readers on a tour of our nation'sunwrittenConstitution, showing how America's foundational document cannot be understood in textual isolation. Proper constitutional interpretation depends on a variety of factors, such as the precedents set by early presidents and Congresses; common practices of modern American citizens; venerable judicial decisions; and particularly privileged sources of inspiration and guidance, including theFederalistpapers, William Blackstone'sCommentaries on the Laws of England, the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, and Martin Luther King, Jr. 's "I Have a Dream" speech. These diverse supplements are indispensible instruments for making sense of the written Constitution. When used correctly, these extra-textual aids support and enrich the written document without supplanting it. An authoritative work by one of America's preeminent legal scholars,America's Unwritten Constitutionpresents a bold new vision of the American constitutional system, showing how the complementary relationship between the Constitution's written and unwritten components is one of America's greatest and most enduring strengths.

Predictive Health

by Kenneth Brigham Michael M. E. Johns

Our health care system is crippled by desperate efforts to prevent the inevitable. A third of the national Medicare budget--nearly $175 billion--is spent on the final year of life, and a third of that amount on the final month, often on expensive (and futile) treatments. Such efforts betray a fundamental flaw in how we think about healthcare: we squander resources on hopeless situations, instead of using them to actually improve health. InPredictive Health, distinguished doctors Kenneth Brigham and Michael M. E. Johns propose a solution: invest earlier--and use science and technology to make healthcare more available and affordable. Every child would begin life with a post-natal genetic screen, when potential risk--say for type II diabetes or heart disease--would be found. More data on biology, behavior, and environment would be captured throughout her life. Using this information, health-care workers and the people they care for could forge personal strategies for healthier living long before a small glitch blows up into major disease. This real health care wouldn't just replace much of modern disease care--it would make it obsolete. The result, according to Brigham and Johns, will be a life defined by a long stay at top physical and mental form, rather than an early peak and long decline. Accomplishing this goal will require new tools, new clinics, fewer doctors and more mentors, smarter companies, and engaged patients. In short, it will require a revolution. Thanks to a decade-long collaboration between Brigham, Johns and others, it is already underway. An optimistic plan for reducing or eliminating many chronic diseases as well as reforming our faltering medical system,Predictive Healthis adeeply knowledgeable, deeply humane proposal for how we can reallocate expenses and resources to prolong the best years of life, rather than extending the worst.

The Ravenous Brain

by Daniel Bor

Consciousness is our gateway to experience: it enables us to recognize Van Gogh's starry skies, be enraptured by Beethoven's Fifth, and stand in awe of a snowcapped mountain. Yet consciousness is subjective, personal, and famously difficult to examine: philosophers have for centuries declared this mental entity so mysterious as to be impenetrable to science. InThe Ravenous Brain, neuroscientist Daniel Bor departs sharply from this historical view, and builds on the latest research to propose a new model for how consciousness works. Bor argues that this brain-based faculty evolved as an accelerated knowledge gathering tool. Consciousness is effectively an idea factory--that choice mental space dedicated to innovation, a key component of which is the discovery of deep structures within the contents of our awareness. This model explains our brains' ravenous appetite for information--and in particular, its constant search for patterns. Why, for instance, after all our physical needs have been met, do we recreationally solve crossword or Sudoku puzzles? Such behavior may appear biologically wasteful, but, according to Bor, this search for structure can yield immense evolutionary benefits--it led our ancestors to discover fire and farming, pushed modern society to forge ahead in science andtechnology, and guides each one of us to understand and control the world around us. But the sheer innovative power of human consciousness carries with it the heavy cost of mental fragility. Bor discusses the medical implications of his theory of consciousness, and what it means for the origins and treatment of psychiatric ailments, including attention-deficit disorder, schizophrenia, manic depression, and autism. All mental illnesses, he argues, can be reformulated as disorders of consciousness--a perspective that opens up new avenues of treatment for alleviating mental suffering. A controversial view of consciousness,The Ravenous Brainlinks cognition to creativity in an ingenious solution to one of science's biggest mysteries.

Answers for Aristotle

by Massimo Pigliucci

How should we live? According to philosopher and biologist Massimo Pigliucci, the greatest guidance to this essential question lies in combining the wisdom of 24 centuries of philosophy with the latest research from 21st century science. In Answers for Aristotle, Pigliucci argues that the combination of science and philosophy first pioneered by Aristotle offers us the best possible tool for understanding the world and ourselves. As Aristotle knew, each mode of thought has the power to clarify the other: science provides facts, and philosophy helps us reflect on the values with which to assess them. But over the centuries, the two have become uncoupled, leaving us with questions--about morality, love, friendship, justice, and politics--that neither field could fully answer on its own. Pigliucci argues that only by rejoining each other can modern science and philosophy reach their full potential, while we harness them to help us reach ours. Pigliucci discusses such essential issues as how to tell right from wrong, the nature of love and friendship, and whether we can really ever know ourselves--all in service of helping us find our path to the best possible life. Combining the two most powerful intellectual traditions in history, Answers for Aristotle is a remarkable guide to discovering what really matters and why.

Drawing the Map of Life

by Victor K. Mcelheny

Science journalist McElheny charts the history of the human genome project from the discovery of DNA less than sixty years ago to the real possibility of recreating our own genetic coding. Along the way he puts faces to the scientists working on the project. He also covers the political and ethical debates. For some of the researchers, the search was intensified by personal experiences. One had a brother with Down Syndrome, another a child with schizophrenia. The wide-ranging possibilities of genetic manipulation are discussed, including retro-viruses to treat cancer and AIDS and increase food production. For the most part, McElheny concentrates on telling the story without becoming embroiled in the ethical and religious controversies surrounding the topic. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Arabs

by Eugene Rogan

This excellent history of the Middle East, a paperbound reprint of the 2009 edition, provides readers with a compelling narrative that explains the current state of the wider Arab world through an exploration of the major periods in its recent history. Divided chronologically, the work examines the period of Ottoman rule from 1516 to the early 1800s, the era of European colonization, the Cold War era, and the ongoing period of U. S. intervention. Drawing on primary source material, the work discusses the continuity of Arab culture in relation to dominating external powers and provides a cogent analysis of the current political and religious conflicts gripping the nations of the Arab world. The work includes a collection of color plates. Rogan is a professor of Middle East studies at St. Anthony's College, Oxford. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Massive

by Ian Sample

While physicists dislike the media calling the theorized Higgs boson "the God particle," scientists at CERN's Large Hadron Collider near Geneva and the Fermilab outside of Chicago are nonetheless engaged in a race to confirm its existence. In an accessible account, Sample (science correspondent, The Guardian) traces the science and politics driving this search for the missing piece of the Standard Model that describes all of the known particles. The machines and money involved and the implications are massive. He also covers public safety concerns. This is a paperbound reprint of the 2010 edition. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Games Primates Play

by Dario Maestripieri

Most humans dont realize that when they exchange emails with someone, anyone, they are actually exhibiting certain unspoken rules about dominance and hierarchy. The same rules regulate the exchange of grooming behavior in rhesus macaques or chimpanzees. Interestingly, some of the major aspects of human nature have profound commonalities with our ape ancestors: the violence of war, the intensity of love, the need to live together. In Games Primates Play, primatologist Dario Maestripieri examines the curious unspoken customs that govern our behavior. An idiosyncratic and witty approach to our deep and complex origins, Games Primates Play reveals the ways in which our primate nature drives so much of our lives.

Turning the Tide

by Ed Offley

The United States experienced its most harrowing military disaster of World War II not in 1941 at Pearl Harbor but in the period from 1942 to 1943, in Atlantic coastal waters from Newfoundland to the Caribbean. Sinking merchant ships with impunity, German U-boats threatened the lifeline between the United States and Britain, very nearly denying the Allies their springboard onto the European Continent--a loss that would have effectively cost the Allies the war. In Turning the Tide, author Ed Offley tells the gripping story of how, during a twelve-week period in the spring of 1943, a handful of battle-hardened American, British, and Canadian sailors turned the tide in the Atlantic. Using extensive archival research and interviews with key survivors, Offley places the reader at the heart of the most decisive maritime battle of World War II.

Dog Sense

by John Bradshaw

Bradshaw, (director, Anthrozoology Institute, U. of Bristol) an expert on dog-human interaction, draws on canine science to argue that dogs have been misunderstood and that current ideas about dogs' motivations and behavior are harmful. He discusses the ways in which changing expectations of dogs, breeding to accentuate certain physical traits, and an over-reliance on comparative zoology in linking dogs so closely to wolves, have done a disservice to dogs and suggests new ways of understanding and relating to our canine friends. A selection of further reading is included. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Love's Executioner

by Irvin D. Yalom

The collection of ten absorbing tales by master psychotherapist Irvin D. Yalom uncovers the mysteries, frustrations, pathos, and humor at the heart of the therapeutic encounter. In recounting his patients' dilemmas, Yalom not only gives us a rare and enthralling glimpse into their personal desires and motivations but also tells us his own story as he struggles to reconcile his all-too human responses with his sensibility as a psychiatrist. Not since Freud has an author done so much to clarify what goes on between a psychotherapist and a patient.

How to Stop Time

by Ann Marlowe

"Heroin," writes Ann Marlowe, "is a stand-in, a stopgap, a mask for what we believe is missing. Like the 'objects' seen by Plato's man in a cave, dope is the shadow cast by cultural movements we can't see directly. "Cultural criticism masquerading as a heroin memoir masquerading as a dictionary,how to stop timelooks at American society through the lens of heroin use. Weaving personal history (Marlowe used heroin for eight years) with aphorisms and analysis, Ann Marlowe is unsparing in her exploration of her, and society's, obsession with heroin addiction. There is no glamorization of 'heroin chic,' nothing about the irresistible power of the drug, no cliched scenes of degradation and ecstasy. There is much about craving the validation of danger, about suburban childhood, about the loss of a father to Parkinson's disease, about moving to the East Village, musicians' parties, being cool, and striving to remake yourself. how to stop timeis the first book to examine heroin in relation to our cynical, post-consumer society, and the first to explain the profound nostalgia that powers both addiction and our age. "That drive to return to the past," Ann Marlowe writes, "isn't an innocent one. It's about stopping your passage to the future. It is a symptom of the fear of death and the love of predictable experience. " Moral but not pious, this book sheds new light not just on nostalgia but on digital culture, consumerism, and glamour. In the annals of addiction literature it will take its place beside William S. Burroughs'sJunkie, Jim Carroll'sBasketball Diaries, and Thomas De Quincey'sConfessions of an English Opium Eater.

Manning Up

by Kay S. Hymowitz

Hymowitz, author of Marriage and Caste in America: Separate and Unequal Families in a Post-Marital Age, examines the radical changes in male courting habits over the last 50 years. He asserts that in an economic and social landscape where the traditional male role has been made unnecessary and even, in many ways, undesirable, a new stage of male development has emerged. These man-children live out their 20's and 30's with fierce anti-domestic tendencies, thus presenting courtship difficulties for their female peers. Hymowitz attempts here to explain this change and what it means for the future of family life and society as a whole. This book will appeal to those with an interest in sociology and modern culture. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Hitler

by A. N. Wilson

A ruthless dictator who saved his country from economic ruin only to nearly destroy it-and an entire people-in his quest for world domination, Adolf Hitler forever changed the course of history. In this masterful account of Hitler's life, biographer A. N. Wilson pulls back the curtain to reveal the man behind the mythic figure, shedding new light on Hitler's personality, his desires, and his complex relationship with the German people. While Hitler maintained that his life had been characterized by "struggle" from its very beginnings, Wilson shows that the reality could not have been more different. Hitler grew up in middle-class comfort and, as a young man, lacked ambitions of any sort besides a vaguely bohemian desire to become an artist. And while the Hitlerian mythos holds that he forged his skills as a leader during the First World War, Wilson explains the truth: Hitler spent most of the war as an office boy miles from the front lines, and only received his cherished Iron Cross because of his slavishness to the officers he served. The army gave him a sense of purpose and brotherhood, however, which continued to inspire Hitler once the war ended. Hitler left the army with no skills, contacts, or money-and yet, within fourteen years, he would become chancellor of the German nation. Wilson describes the story of Hitler's ascent as one of both opportunism and sheer political shrewdness. He possessed no real understanding of the workings of government but had a prodigious knack for public speaking, and found that a large number of Germans, despairing at their country's recent defeat and terrified by the specter of international communism, were willing to listen to the right-wing fantasies that had taken root inside his head. Allying himself with the extremist German Workers' Party (soon renamed the National Socialist Party), Hitler offered many Germans a seductive vision of how the country might raise itself back up and reclaim its rightful place at the center of world politics. Wilson shows that, although Hitler's bid for power stalled at first, he soon gained traction with a German public starved for hope. Using his skills as a manipulator, Hitler found himself first at the head of the Nazi Party, then at the helm of the German nation. Wilson explores the forces that allowed Hitler to become Chancellor of Germany, and later to march Germany into total war. He examines Hitler's increasingly virulent anti-Semitism and his decision to implement the Final Solution to exterminate European Jews, and he considers Hitler's tactical successes-and failures-in World War II. Wilson also reveals a great deal about how Hitler's personal life affected his time as Germany's leader, from the lasting pain caused by the death of his mother and the suicide of his young niece to his poor health and addiction to the drugs prescribed by his doctor. As Wilson demonstrates, Hitler the Führer was not so different from Hitler the bohemian: lazy, moody, and hypersensitive, he ruled more through intimidation and the mystifying force of his personality than through any managerial skill or informed decision-making. His story-and that of Germany-is ultimately a cautionary tale. In a modern era enamored with progress, rationality, and modernity, it is often the darkest and most chaotic elements of society that prove the most seductive. Hitler's unlikely rise to power and his uncanny ability to manipulate his fellow man resulted in the deaths of millions of Europeans and a horrific world war, yet despite his colossal role in world history, he remains mythologized and, as a result, misunderstood. In Hitler, A. N. Wilson limns this mysterious figure with great verve and acuity, showing that it was Hitler's frightening normalcy-not some otherworldly evilness-that makes him so truly terrifying.

It's Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism

by Thomas E. Mann Norman J. Ornstein

Congressional scholars Mann (government studies, The Brookings Institution) and Ornstein (American Enterprise Institute) survey the roots and scope of America's dysfunctional politics. They identify several sources of dysfunction: adversarial political parties; a governing system that makes it difficult for majorities to act, due to separation of powers, separately elected institutions, and constraints on majority rule; and the Republican Party, which has become ideologically extreme. They criticize common responses to the American political situation, such as proposals for public financing of elections and the notion that "the political system will correct itself. " The authors make recommendations for fixing the party system, reforming US political institutions, and navigating the current system. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Screen Time

by Lisa Guernsey

As a mother, Lisa Guernsey wondered about the influence of television on her two young daughters. As a reporter, she resolved to find out. What she first encountered was tired advice, sensationalized research claims, and a rather draconian mandate from the American Academy of Pediatrics: no TV at all before the age of two. But like many parents, she wanted straight answers and realistic advice, so she kept digging: she visited infant-perception labs and child development centers around the country. She interviewed scores of parents, psychologists, cognitive scientists, and media researchers, as well as programming executives at Noggin, Disney, Nickelodeon, Sesame Workshop, and PBS. Much of what she found flies in the face of conventional wisdom and led her to conclude that new parents will be best served by focusing on "the three C's": content, context, and the individual child. Advocating a new approach to television and DVDs, Guernsey focuses on infants to five-year-olds and goes beyond the headlines to explore what exactly is "educational" about educational media. She examines how play and language development are affected by background and foreground television and how to choose videos that are age-appropriate. She explains how to avoid the hype of "brain stimulation" and focus instead on social relationships and the building blocks of language and literacy. Along the way, Guernsey highlights independent research on shows ranging from Dora the Explorer to Dragon Tales, and distills some surprising new findings in the field of child development. Into the Minds of Babesis a fascinating book that points out how little credible research exists to support the AAP's dire recommendation. Parents, teachers, and psychologists will be relieved to learn positive approaches to using videos with young children and will be empowered to make their own informed choices.

There Is No Alternative

by Claire Berlinski

Great Britain in the 1970s appeared to be in terminal decline-ungovernable, an economic train wreck, and rapidly headed for global irrelevance. Three decades later, it is the richest and most influential country in Europe, and Margaret Thatcher is the reason. The preternaturally determined Thatcher rose from nothing, seized control of Britain's Conservative party, and took a sledgehammer to the nation's postwar socialist consensus. She proved that socialism could be reversed, inspiring a global free-market revolution. Simultaneously exploiting every politically useful aspect of her femininity and defying every conventional expectation of women in power, Thatcher crushed her enemies with a calculated ruthlessness that stunned the British public and without doubt caused immense collateral damage. Ultimately, however, Claire Berlinski agrees with Thatcher: There was no alternative. Berlinski explains what Thatcher did, why it matters, and how she got away with it in this vivid and immensely readable portrait of one of the towering figures of the twentieth century.

Intellectuals and Society

by Thomas Sowell

Sowell (Hoover Institution, Stanford U. ) issues a right-wing jeremiad against the intelligentsia, the membership of which seems to primarily consist of academics, writers, etc. whose views he finds distasteful. If there is a core argument to the work, it is that intellect does not equal wisdom, that the ideas of intellectuals are not subjected to empirical verifiability, and that intellectuals wield an outsized influence on society that often leads to harmful outcomes (less so, he notes gratefully, in the United States than in Europe, although it is telling that he places the high point of US intellectuals' influence as being in the 1960s and 1970s, an era of greater left influence than later decades). However, this core argument appears to be less of a thesis to be proved than a hook upon which to hang a litany of complaints against ideas that he disagrees with in the realms of economics, social visions, the law, and war. With regards to these complaints, Sowell is frequently less than convincing, as he rarely treats the ideas of his opponents with even a semblance of seriousness. On the very first page, for instance, he argues that Marx's idea that labor is the source of all wealth is disproved because, "if this were true, countries with much labor and little technology or entrepreneurship would be more prosperous than countries with the reverse, when in fact it is blatantly obvious that the direct opposite is the case. " This is such a laughably ridiculous distortion of Marx's theory of labor value that is hard to imagine that any thoughtful reader could possibly take it, or most of the rest of Sowell's similarly-styled arguments, seriously. Those on the right who merely want their political beliefs reinforced may find the work enjoyable however. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Words Like Loaded Pistols

by Sam Leith

Leith, a British journalist and writer, offers a no-nonsense introduction to rhetoric for an intelligent, but non-academic audience. He uses both historical and contemporary, real and literary examples to present where western rhetoric comes from and how it has been taught/used over the ages; what the terms of rhetoric are; why different arguments work the way they do and why some arguments work while others don't. The aim of the book is to instill a practical awareness for rhetoric. He considers five parts of rhetoric--invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery--as well as three branches of oratory--deliberative, judicial, and epideictic rhetoric. Along the way he draws on great speeches and "champions of rhetoric," from Martin Luther King to Satan to Barack Obama to Hitler to Cicero. There is a glossary of rhetorical terms in the back. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Epic of New York City

by Edward Robb Ellis

In swift, witty chapters that flawlessly capture the pace and character of New York City, acclaimed diarist Edward Robb Ellis presents his masterpiece: a thorough, and thoroughly readable, history of America's largest metropolis. Ellis narrates some of the most significant events of the past three hundred years and more-the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr's fatal duel, the formation of the League of Nations, the Great Depression-from the perspective of the city that experienced, and influenced, them all. Throughout, he infuses his account with the strange and delightful anecdotes that a less charming tour guide might omit, from the story of the city's first, block-long subway to that of the blizzard of 1888 that turned Macy's into one big slumber party. Playful yet authoritative, comprehensive yet intimate, The Epic of New York City confirms the words of its own epigraph, spoken by Oswald Spengler: "World history is city history," particularly when that city is the Big Apple.

The Rise of the Creative Class--Revisited

by Richard Florida

The Washington Monthly 2002 Annual Political Book Award WinnerThe Rise of the Creative Class gives us a provocative new way to think about why we live as we do today-and where we might be headed. Weaving storytelling with masses of new and updated research, Richard Florida traces the fundamental theme that runs through a host of seemingly unrelated changes in American society: the growing role of creativity in our economy. Just as William Whyte's 1956 classic The Organization Man showed how the organizational ethos of that age permeated every aspect of life, Florida describes a society in which the creative ethos is increasingly dominant. Millions of us are beginning to work and live much as creative types like artists and scientists always have-with the result that our values and tastes, our personal relationships, our choices of where to live, and even our sense and use of time are changing. Leading the shift are the nearly 38 million Americans in many diverse fields who create for a living-the Creative Class. The Rise of the Creative Class chronicles the ongoing sea of change in people's choices and attitudes, and shows not only what's happening but also how it stems from a fundamental economic change. The Creative Class now comprises more than thirty percent of the entire workforce. Their choices have already had a huge economic impact. In the future they will determine how the workplace is organized, what companies will prosper or go bankrupt, and even which cities will thrive or wither.

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