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Showing 41,226 through 41,250 of 73,671 results

One Renegade Cell

by Robert A. Weinberg

Cancer research has reached a major turning point, and no one is better qualified to explain the past two deacades' dramatic leaps forward in understanding this disease than world-renowned molecular biologist Robert Weinberg, director of the Oncology Research Laboratory at the Whitehead Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts. InOne Renegade Cell, Weinberg presents a state-of-the-art account of how cancer begins and how, one day, it will be cured.

One Day, All Children...

by Wendy Kopp

From her dorm room at Princeton University, twenty-one-year-old college senior Wendy Kopp decided to launch a movement to improve public education in America. InOne Day, All Children. . . , she shares the remarkable story of Teach For America, a non-profit organization that sends outstanding college graduates to teach for two years in the most under-resourced urban and rural public schools in America. The astonishing success of the program has proven it possible for children in low-income areas to attain the same level of academic achievement as children in more privileged areas and more privileged schools. One Day, All Children...is not just a personal memoir. It's a blueprint for the new civil rights movement--a movement that demands educational access and opportunity for all American children.

Never Coming To A Theater Near You

by Kenneth Turan

It is in the nature of today's movie business that while Hollywood blockbusters invade every megaplex, smaller, quality films often don't get screen time. Fans of finer films have to count on catching up with them on video and DVD, but even the most hard-core devotees have trouble remembering what sounded good when a film was originally released. Never Coming to a Theater Near You will remedy that situation. This selection of renowned film critic Kenneth Turan's absorbing and illuminating reviews, now revised and updated to factor in the tests of time, point viewers toward the films they can't quite remember, but should not miss. Moviegoers know they can trust Turan's impeccable taste. His eclectic selection represents the kind of sophisticated, adult, and entertaining films intelligent viewers are hungry for. More importantly, Turan shows readers what makes these unusual films so great, revealing how talented filmmakers and actors have managed to create the wonderful highs we experience in front of the silver screen.

Mind, Language And Society: Philosophy in the Real World

by John R. Searle

Disillusionment with psychology is leading more and more people to formal philosophy for clues about how to think about life. But most of us who try to grapple with concepts such as reality, truth, common sense, consciousness, and society lack the rigorous training to discuss them with any confidence. John Searle brings these notions down from their abstract heights to the terra firma of real-world understanding, so that those with no knowledge of philosophy can understand how these principles play out in our everyday lives. The author stresses that there is a real world out there to deal with, and condemns the belief that the reality of our world is dependent on our perception of it.

Men and Women of the Corporation

by Rosabeth Moss Kanter

In this landmark work on corporate power, especially as it relates to women, Rosabeth Moss Kanter, the distinguished Harvard management thinker and consultant, shows how the careers and self-images of the managers, professionals, and executives, and also those of the secretaries, wives of managers, and women looking for a way up, are determined by the distribution of power and powerlessness within the corporation. This new edition of her award-winning book has a major new afterward in which the author reviews and analyzes how attitudes and practices within the corporate power structure have changed in the 1990s.

Mad in America

by Robert Whitaker

Science journalist Whitaker has updated the 2002 edition of his history of the treatment of mental illness in America from 1750 to the present. The main changes are a new preface and epilogue; his argument remains the same. He concludes that the treatment of schizophrenia has been hit or miss throughout time, with an emphasis not on curing the patients, but controlling them. Particular emphasis is given to the widespread use of antipsychotics that, he states, actually make the patient worse and can cause organ damage that leads to early death. He blames skewed test results sponsored by pharmaceutical companies along with collusion by "academic psychiatrists. " His outrage, while understandable, overwhelms the conclusions he derives from studies indicating that patients treated with traditional long term psychotherapy and given drugs as a secondary, short-term treatment, are more likely to be cured. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Lords of the Harvest: Biotech, Big Money, and the Future of Food

by Daniel Charles

Biotech companies are creating designer crops with strange powers-from cholesterol-reducing soybeans to tobacco plants that act as solar-powered pharmaceutical factories. They promise great benefits: better health for consumers and more productive agriculture. But the vision has a dark side. In Lords of the Harvest, Daniel Charles tells the real story behind "Frankenstein foods"-the story you won't hear from the biotech companies or their fiercest opponents. He reveals for the first time the cutthroat scientific competition and backroom business deals that led to the first genetically engineered foods. And he exposes the secrets of campaigns on both sides of the Atlantic aimed at bringing down the biotech industry. A riveting tale of boundless ambition, political intrigue, and the quest for knowledge, Lords of the Harvest is ultimately a story of idealism and conflicting dreams about the shape of a better world.

Last Wish

by Betty Rollin

At a time when tempers flare over the Oregon assisted suicide law and Jack Kevorkian's physician-aid-in-dying, Last Wish, Betty Rollin's groundbreaking New York Times bestseller, is due for a rereading. Last Wish is an intimate, fiercely honest memoir of a daughter's struggle to come to terms with her terminally ill mother's decision to die. More than a examination of the ethical, spiritual, and technical aspects of assisted suicide, Last Wish is also a celebration of Rollin's imperfect family, a passionate testament to her mother's character and courage, and a compelling argument for the right of the terminally ill to a humane and dignified death. The PublicAffairs paperback edition includes a new foreword, questions for thought and discussion, and a helpful resource guide.

Killing Monsters: Why Children Need Fantasy, Super Heroes, and Make-Believe Violence

by Gerard Jones

Make-believe violence plays an essential role in children's development. Jones calls for parents, teachers and everyone to learn why these entertainments hold such enormous appeal and how they can help children develop in a healthy way. Children love fantasy violence not because the media indoctrinates them, but because it gives them coping skills they desperately need. Drawing on a wealth of true stories, many gleaned from the workshops Jones conducts with children and teenagers, he reveals why validating these fantasies teaches our kids to trust their own emotions, build stronger selves, and withstand the pressures of pop culture -- and why attacking or trying to eliminate them only increases the media's potential negative effects.

Rapid Development

by Steve Mcconnell

Corporate and commercial software-development teams all want solutions for one important problem--how to get their high-pressure development schedules under control. In RAPID DEVELOPMENT, author Steve McConnell addresses that concern head-on with overall strategies, specific best practices, and valuable tips that help shrink and control development schedules and keep projects moving. Inside, you'll find: A rapid-development strategy that can be applied to any project and the best practices to make that strategy work Candid discussions of great and not-so-great rapid-development practices--estimation, prototyping, forced overtime, motivation, teamwork, rapid-development languages, risk management, and many othersA list of classic mistakes to avoid for rapid-development projects, including creeping requirements, shortchanged quality, and silver-bullet syndromeCase studies that vividly illustrate what can go wrong, what can go right, and how to tell which direction your project is goingRAPID DEVELOPMENT is the real-world guide to more efficient applications development.

Just War Against Terror

by Jean Elshtain

Jean Bethke Elshtain advocates "just war" in times of crisis and mounts a reasoned attack against the anti-war contingent in American intellectual life. Advocating an ethic of responsibility, Elshtain forces us to ask tough questions not only about the nature of terrorism, but about ourselves. This paperback edition features a new introduction by the author, addressing the Iraq war and other events in the Middle East.

How Mumbo Jumbo Conquered the World

by Francis Wheen

Wheen, a columnist for the London Guardian, evokes the key personalities of the post-political age, including Princess Diana, Deepak Chopra, Osama bin Laden, and Nancy Reagan's astrologer, to lament the rise of superstition, relativism, and emotional hysteria over the last 25 years. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

How We Got Here: The 70s The Decade That Brought You Modern Life -- For Better Or Worse

by David Frum

For many, the 1970s evoke the Brady Bunch and the birth of disco. In this first, thematic popular history of the decade, David Frum argues that it was the 1970s, not the 1960s, that created modern America and altered the American personality forever. A society that had valued faith, self-reliance, self-sacrifice, and family loyalty evolved in little more than a decade into one characterized by superstition, self-interest, narcissism, and guilt. Frum examines this metamorphosis through the rise to cultural dominance of faddish psychology, astrology, drugs, religious cults, and consumer debt, and profiles such prominent players of the decade as Werner Erhard, Alex Comfort, and Jerry Brown. How We Got Here is lively and provocative reading.

Homeward Bound

by Elaine Tyler May

When Homeward Bound first appeared in 1988, it altered the way we understood Cold War America. The post-World War II era was thought of as a time when Americans turned away from politics to enjoy the fruits of peace and prosperity, while their leaders remained preoccupied with the dangers of the Atomic Age. Elaine Tyler May demonstrated that the Cold War infused life on every level from the boardroom to the bedroom. This new edition includes up-to-date information and references, along with an epilogue that examines how the legacy of the Cold War has shaped America since September 11, 2001.

Good Work: When Excellence and Ethics Meet

by Howard Gardner

What does it mean to carry out "good work"? What strategies allow people to maintain moral and ethical standards at a time when market forces have unprecedented power and work life is being radically altered by technological innovation? These questions lie at the heart of this eagerly awaited new book. Focusing on genetics and journalism-two fields that generate and manipulate information and thus affect our lives in myriad ways-the authors show how in their quest to build meaningful careers successful professionals exhibit "humane creativity," high-level performance coupled with social responsibility. Over the last five years the authors have interviewed over 100 people in each field who are engaged in cutting-edge work, probing their goals and visions, their obstacles and fears, and how they pass on their most cherished practices and values. They found sharp contrasts between the two fields. Until now, geneticists' values have not been seriously challenged by the demands of their work world, while journalists are deeply disillusioned by the conflict between commerce and ethics. The dilemmas these professionals face and the strategies they choose in their search for a moral compass offer valuable guidance on how all persons can transform their professions and their lives. Enlivened with stories of real people facing hard decisions, Good Work offers powerful insight into one of the most important issues of our time and, indeed, into the future course of science, technology, and communication.

First Person

by Vladimir Putin Nataliya Gevorkyan Natalya Timakova Andrei Kolesnikov

An intimate, candid portrait of the man who holds the future of Russia in his grip. An extraordinary compilation of over 24hours of in-depth interviews and remarkable photographs, it delves deep into Putin's KGB past and explores his meteoric rise to power. No Russian leader has ever subjected himself to this kind of public examination of his life and views. Both as a spy and as a virtual political unknown until selected by Boris Yeltsin to be Prime Minister, Putin has been regarded as a man of mystery. Now, the curtain lifts to reveal a remarkable life of struggles and successes. Putin's life story is of major importance to the world.

Feeding Your Child - The Brazelton Way

by T. Berry Brazelton Joshua Sparrow

Nursing newborns, picky toddlers, four-year-olds with bizarre food preferences-at every age, parents are concerned with what their children eat. In this indispensable, straight-to-the-point guide, Brazelton and Sparrow follow the same approach of the earlier three very successful books in this series. First they apply the Touchpoints philosophy to feeding (watch for the setbacks that often come before a leap of progress), then they follow feeding progress age by age, and finally they deal with the most common issues: breast or bottle, weaning, basic nutritional needs, the over-involved parent, food battles, adolescent overeating, and the roots of eating disorders. Mealtimes can be fun, healthy, family times-the Brazelton Way.

Fear No Evil

by Natan Sharansky

Temperamentally and intellectually, Natan Sharansky is a man very much like many of us-which makes this account of his arrest on political grounds, his trial, and ten years' imprisonment in the Orwellian universe of the Soviet gulag particularly vivid and resonant. Since Fear No Evil was originally published in 1988, the Soviet government that imprisoned Sharansky has collapsed. Sharansky has become an important national leader in Israel-and serves as Israel's diplomatic liaison to the former Soviet Union! New York Times Jerusalem Bureau Chief Serge Schmemann reflects on those monumental events, and on Sharansky's extraordinary life in the decades since his arrest, in a new introduction to this edition. But the truths Sharansky learned in his jail cell and sets forth in this book have timeless importance so long as rulers anywhere on earth still supress their own peoples. For anyone with an interest in human rights-and anyone with an appreciation for the resilience of the human spirit-he illuminates the weapons with which the powerless can humble the powerful: physical courage, an untiring sense of humor, a bountiful imagination, and the conviction that "Nothing they do can humiliate me. I alone can humiliate myself. "

Fables Of Abundance

by Jackson Lears

Fables of Abundance ranges from the traveling peddlers of early modern Europe to the twentieth-century American corporation, exploring the ways that advertising collaborated with other cultural institutions to produce the dominant aspirations and anxieties in the modern United States.

Extraordinary Minds: Portraits of Exceptional Individuals and an Examination of Our Extraordinariness

by Howard Gardner

Fifteen years ago, psychologist and educator Howard Gardner introduced the idea of multiple intelligences, challenging the presumption that intelligence consists of verbal or analytic abilities only-those intelligences that schools tend to measure. He argued for a broader understanding of the intelligent mind, one that embraces creation in the arts and music, spatial reasoning, and the ability to understand ourselves and others. Today, Gardner's ideas have become widely accepted-indeed, they have changed how we think about intelligence, genius, creativity, and even leadership, and he is widely regarded as one of the most important voices writing on these subjects. Now, in Extraordinary Minds, a book as riveting as it is new, Gardner poses an important question: Is there a set of traits shared by all truly great achievers-those we deem extraordinary-no matter their field or the time period within which they did their important work?In an attempt to answer this question, Gardner first examines how most of us mature into more or less competent adults. He then examines closely four persons who lived unquestionably extraordinary lives-Mozart, Freud, Woolf, and Gandhi-using each as an exemplar of a different kind of extraordinariness: Mozart as the master of a discipline, Freud as the innovative founder of a new discipline, Woolf as the great introspector, and Gandhi as the influencer. What can we learn about ourselves from the experiences of the extraordinary? Interestingly, Gardner finds that an excess of raw power is not the most impressive characteristic shared by superachievers; rather, these extraordinary individuals all have had a special talent for identifying their own strengths and weaknesses, for accurately analyzing the events of their own lives, and for converting into future successes those inevitable setbacks that mark every life. Gardner provides answers to a number of provocative questions, among them: How do we explain extraordinary times-Athens in the fifth century B. C. , the T'ang Dynasty in the eighth century, Islamic Society in the late Middle Ages, and New York at the middle of the century? What is the relation among genius, creativity, fame, success, and moral extraordinariness? Does extraordinariness make for a happier, more fulfilling life, or does it simply create a special onus?

Confessions of a Slacker Mom

by Muffy Mead-Ferro

Parents who are fed up with the pressure to turn their children into star athletes, concert violinists, and merit scholars-all at once!-finally have an alternative: the world of Slacker Moms, where kids learn to do things for themselves and parents can cut themselves some slack; where it's perfectly all right to do less, have less, and spend less. Slacker moms say "No" to parenting philosophies that undermine parents'-and children's-ability to think for themselves. They say "Yes" to saving their money and time by opting out of the parenting competition. And they say "Hell, Yes!" to having a life of their own, knowing it makes them better parents. In this witty and insightful book, author Muffy Mead-Ferro reflects on her experience of growing up on a ranch in Wyoming, where parenting-by necessity-was more hands-off, people "made do" with what they had, and common sense and generational wisdom prevailed. We should all take her sane lead!

Clockspeed

by Charles H. Fine

It's an undeniable principle of business today that the forces of technological and management change can quickly knock an industry leader off their pedestal, to be replaced by a more innovative or savvy competitor. In order to survive, let alone thrive, companies must be able to anticipate and adapt to change, or face rapid, brutal extinction. In "Clockspeed," Charles Fine provides managers with the analytical tools they need to anticipate the twists and turns of the marketplace and seize tomorrow's opportunities while simultaneously exploiting today's. This revolutionary book gives managers the ability to look into the future and determine the evolution of their company--and even their industry--by the choices they make about which capabilities to keep in-house and which to purchase from outside suppliers or distributors. Fine introduces a whole new vocabulary for analyzing and implementing business strategy, turning managers into "corporate geneticists. "

Clock Of The Long Now: Time And Responsibility: The Ideas Behind The World's Slowest Computer

by Stewart Brand

Using the designing and building of the Clock of the Long Now as a framework, this is a book about the practical use of long time perspective: how to get it, how to use it, how to keep it in and out of sight. Here are the central questions it inspires: How do we make long-term thinking automatic and common instead of difficult and rare? Discipline in thought allows freedom. One needs the space and reliability to predict continuity to have the confidence not to be afraid of revolutions Taking the time to think of the future is more essential now than ever, as culture accelerates beyond its ability to be measured Probable things are vastly outnumbered by countless near-impossible eventualities. Reality is statistically forced to be extraordinary; fiction is not allowed this freedom This is a potent book that combines the chronicling of fantastic technology with equally visionary philosophical inquiry.

Battles Of The Revolutionary War

by W. J. Wood

The Americans did not simply outlast the British, nor was the war just a glorified guerrilla action with sporadic skirmishes. Americans won their independence on the battlefield by employing superior strategies, tactics, and leadership. So W. J. Wood contends in this groundbreaking study of the battles of Bunker Hill, Quebec, Trenton, Princeton, Saratoga, Cowpens, and others. For each engagement he describes the types of combatants on each side and the weapons available to them; outlines the tactics; narrates blow-by-blow accounts; and analyzes the factors that determined the character of the battle and outcome. Battles of the Revolutionary War has been designed for the "armchair strategist. " Dozens of illustrations and maps, many specially prepared for this volume, contribute to the overall clarity and insight of Wood's presentation. Anyone with a desire to attain a feel for the dramatic times and colorful personalities that accompanied the birth of this country would do well to read it.

Applied Economics

by Sowell

This revised and updated edition adds a chapter on the economics of immigration and includes interesting examples and analysis designed for general readers. The chapter on the economics of housing is up to date, exploring the recent subprime mortgage crisis and the role of "creative" financing. But the chapter on the economics of medical care, while expanded to cover the issue of organ transplants, appears to have been written before many of the issues arose in the current debate about paying for health care. Other chapters focus on labor, the economics of discrimination, and the economic development over time of various nations. Includes a sources section with the references written more in a text style. Sowell is a Scholar in Residence at the Hoover Institution. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

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