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What Colleges Don't Tell You

by Elizabeth Wissner-Gross

From the author of What Colleges Don't Tell You, 250 secrets for raising the kid colleges will compete to acceptThe headlines prove it: Competition for admission to America's top colleges is more cutthroat than ever. Gone are the days when parents could afford to let high school guidance counselors handle the admissions process alone-gone, also, are the days when a student could wait until senior year to prepare for it. As Elizabeth Wissner-Gross, a highly successful educational strategist, knows from working for over a decade with hundreds of middle- and high school students and their parents, if you want to raise a kid colleges will compete for, you must act, early and aggressively, as opportunity scout, coach, tutor, manager, and publicist-or be willing to watch that acceptance letter go to someone whose parents did. What High Schools Don't Tell You reveals 250 strategies to help parents stack the admissions deck in their kid's favor, gleaned from Wissner-Gross's expertise and from interviews with parents of outstandingly high achievers-strategies that most high school guidance counselors, principals, and teachers simply don't know to share. From identifying exactly which academic credentials will wow an admissions committee to which summer programs and extra-curriculars can turn an ordinary applicant into a must-have, What High Schools Don't Tell You demonstrates how hands-on parental involvement early in a child's high school career is essential to achieving college admissions success.

Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher

by Nicholas Wapshott

Drawing on interviews with those closest to them, as well as on hundreds of recently declassified private letters and telephone calls, Nicholas Wapshott depicts a complex, personal, and sometimes argumentative relationship between two unlikely political soulmates.

Unprotected

by Miriam Grossman

Our campuses are steeped in political correctness-that's hardly news to anyone. But no one realizes that radical social agendas have also taken over campus health and counseling centers, with dire consequences. Psychiatrist Miriam Grossman knows this better than anyone. She has treated more than 2,000 students at one of America's most prestigious universities, and she's seen how the anything- goes, women-are-just-like-men, "safer-sex" agenda is actually making our sons and daughters sick. Dr. Grossman takes issue with the experts who suggest that students problems can be solved with free condoms and Zoloft. What campus counselors and health providers must do, she argues, is tell uncomfortable, politically incorrect truths, especially to young patients in their most vulnerable and confused moments. Instead of platitudes and misinformation, it's time to offer them real protection.

Now They Call Me Infidel

by Nonie Darwish

One woman's story of why she left the culture of Islamic Jihad to support American liberty and tolerance Why are so many Muslims embracing jihad and cheering for al-Qaeda and Hamas? Why are even the modern, secularized Arab states such as Egypt producing a generation of angry young extremists?Nonie Darwish knows why. When she was eight, her father died while leading Fedayeen raids into Israel. Her family moved from Gaza back to Cairo, where they were honored as survivors of a "shahid"-a martyr for jihad. She grew up learning the same lessons as millions of Muslim children: to hate Jews, destroy Israel, oppose America, and submit to dictatorship. But Darwish became increasingly appalled by the anger and hatred in her culture, and in 1978 she emigrated to America. Since 9/11 she has been lecturing and writing on behalf of moderate Arabs and Arab-Americans. Extremists have denounced her as an infidel and threatened her life. In this fascinating book, she speaks out against the dark side of her native culture-women abused by Islamic traditions; the poor and uneducated mistreated by the elites; bribery and corruption as a way of life. Her former friends and neighbors blamed all the their troubles on Jews and Americans, but Darwish rejects their bigotry and calls for the Arab world to make peace with the West. The only hope for the future, she writes, is for America to continue waging its War on Terror, seeding the Middle East with the values of democracy, respect for women, and tolerance for all religions.

Primary Mistake

by Steve Laffey

The inside story of the most shocking Republican primary of 2006-and what it means for the GOP's future Why should anyone care about a Senate primary in the nation's smallest state? Because that one unique race tipped the balance of power in Washington and exposed everything that was wrong with the GOP in 2006. It also points the way toward the Republican Party's recovery, in 2008 and beyond. Steve Laffey isn't the kind of slick politician who wanted to be a senator since kindergarten. He's a down- to-earth guy, with working-class Irish Catholic roots, who made good in business and then wanted to save his hometown from financial ruin. As the twice elected mayor of Cranston, Rhode Island, he won over a city full of Democrats with Ronald Reagan's classic message: Fight the special interests, cut out the waste, and opportunity for all. But when he decided to challenge Senator Lincoln Chafee-the most liberal Republican in Congress- Laffey collided head on with the biggest names in the Washington Republican establishment. First, they tried to bully Laffey into dropping out. When that failed, they gave all their support and millions of dollars to Chafee, and even slandered Laffey to the press, breaking Reagan's famous eleventh commandment: "Thou shalt not speak ill of another Republican. " Conservative activists nationwide were outraged and supported Laffey with thousands of e-mails, phone calls, and small donations. It was the ultimate David vs. Goliath campaign, drawing national attention as"the first skirmish in a very important war," as Pat Toomey wrote in The Wall Street Journal. Now, with his straight talk and quirky sense of humor, Laffey reveals the inside story, naming the powerful people who felt so threatened that they resorted to lies and threats. He also shows how much fun it can be to run a go-for-broke campaign, fueled by gut instinct, adrenaline, some passionate staff and volunteers, and a whole lot of pizza. Above all, Laffey shows what happens when a party gets so obsessed with holding on to power that it abandons its core principles. If Republicans read Primary Mistake and take it to heart, they will be back on the road to victory.

A Patriot's History of the United States

by Allen Michael Schweikart Larry

For at least thirty years, high school and college students have been taught to be embarrassed by American history. Required readings have become skewed toward a relentless focus on our country's darkest moments, from slavery to McCarthyism. As a result, many history books devote more space to Harriet Tubman than to Abraham Lincoln; more to My Lai than to the American Revolution; more to the internment of Japanese Americans than to the liberation of Europe in World War II. Now, finally, there is an antidote to this biased approach to our history. Two veteran history professors have written a sweeping, well-researched book that puts the spotlight back on America's role as a beacon of liberty to the rest of the world. Schweikart and Allen are careful to tell their story straight, from Columbus's voyage to the capture of Saddam Hussein. They do not ignore America's mistakes through the years, but they put them back in their proper perspective. And they conclude that America's place as a world leader derived largely from the virtues of our own leaders--the men and women who cleared the wilderness, abolished slavery, and rid the world of fascism and communism. The authors write in a clear and enjoyable style that makes history a pleasure, not just for students but also for adults who want to learn what their teachers skipped over. .

The Truth About Hillary

by Edward Klein

Hillary Rodham Clinton is the most polarizing figure in American politics. Love her or hate her, everyone has a strong opinion about the former first lady turned senator who is almost certainly going to run for president in 2008. Despite more than a dozen years in the national spotlight and more than a dozen unauthorized books about her, she has managed to keep many secrets from the public especially about her turbulent marriage and its impact on her career. There have been plenty of rumors about what Hillary and Bill Clinton did behind closed doors, but never a definitive book that exposes the truth. Bestselling author Edward Klein draws on rare access to inside sources to reveal what Hillary knew and when she knew it during her years as first lady, especially during her husband's impeachment. Klein's book, embargoed until publication, will break news about the choices and calculations she has made over the years. It will also prove that she lied to America in her bestselling autobiography Living History. When she was just a little girl, Hillary Rodham dreamed of becoming the first female president, and her lifelong dream is almost within reach. But just as the swift boat veterans convinced millions of voters that John Kerry lacked the character to be president, Klein's book will influence everyone who is sizing up the character of Hillary Clinton. .

Spud

by John van de Ruit

Spud is the hilarious debut novel by John van de RuitIt's 1990. Apartheid is crumbling, Nelson Mandela has just been released from prison and thirteen-year-old Spud Milton is about to start his first year at an elite boys-only boarding school. Cursed with embarrassingly dysfunctional parents, a nutty granny and a dormitory full of strange characters, Spud has his hands full trying to adapt to his new home. With only his wits and his diary, he takes readers on a rowdy boarding school romp full of illegal midnight swims, catastrophic cricket matches, ghostbusting escapades, girls and disastrous holidays. South African comedian John van de Ruit invites the reader into the mind of a young boy whose eyes are being opened to love, friendship and complete insanity!Some rave reviews from South Africa:'Funny, fast-paced and wonderfully observant' - The Daily News'Once you pick it up it's almost as if the pages turn themselves' - Metrobeat'Achingly funny' - Sunday Times LifestyleJohn van de Ruit was born in Durban, South Africa. He went to the University of Natal where he completed a Masters degree in Drama and Performance. Since 1998 he has been a professional actor, playwright and producer, winning numerous awards. Spud is his first novel.

Those Girls

by Sara Lawrence

THOSE GIRLS are Jinx Slater and Liberty Latiffe- lovely, rich, and wild seventeen-year-olds at the exclusive Stagmount School for Girls. They have the glittery seaside town of Brighton and an endless flow of cash at their fingertips. Nothing-not even their vile ex-housemistress-can slow them down in their pursuit of fun. Then snobby new girl Stella Fox shows up and naïve Liberty falls under her spell. Jinx is determined to win back her best friend, even if it means waging war on power-hungry Stella. But when Jinx delves into Stella's past, she discovers there's a lot more than schoolgirl jealousy on the line . . . This time, Jinx could lose Liberty forever.

The One Where the Kid Nearly Jumps to His Death and Lands in California

by Mary Hershey

"Mom didn't think it was funny when I took off my leg at school, put it in my locker, and then tied a rag around my stump with fake blood on it. After that, though, the kids at school pretty much knew if anyone was going to be cracking jokes about my leg, it was gonna be me. " So says thirteen-year-old Alastair Hudson in this darkly humorous coming-of- age story about the relationship between Alastair-who calls himself Stump to draw shocked attention to his missing leg-and his father, who left the family after the accident that resulted in the amputation five years earlier. When Alastair is sent to spend the summer with his dad and his dad's new wife, father and son are forced to confront the truth of what happened years ago, finally allowing Alastair to move forward with his life.

What High Schools Don't Tell You

by Elizabeth Wissner-Gross

From the author of What Colleges Don't Tell You, 250 secrets for raising the kid colleges will compete to acceptThe headlines prove it: Competition for admission to America's top colleges is more cutthroat than ever. Gone are the days when parents could afford to let high school guidance counselors handle the admissions process alone-gone, also, are the days when a student could wait until senior year to prepare for it. As Elizabeth Wissner-Gross, a highly successful educational strategist, knows from working for over a decade with hundreds of middle- and high school students and their parents, if you want to raise a kid colleges will compete for, you must act, early and aggressively, as opportunity scout, coach, tutor, manager, and publicist-or be willing to watch that acceptance letter go to someone whose parents did. What High Schools Don't Tell You reveals 250 strategies to help parents stack the admissions deck in their kid's favor, gleaned from Wissner-Gross's expertise and from interviews with parents of outstandingly high achievers-strategies that most high school guidance counselors, principals, and teachers simply don't know to share. From identifying exactly which academic credentials will wow an admissions committee to which summer programs and extra-curriculars can turn an ordinary applicant into a must-have, What High Schools Don't Tell You demonstrates how hands-on parental involvement early in a child's high school career is essential to achieving college admissions success.

Dog Man

by Martha Sherrill

This is the story of how one man's consuming passion for dogs saved a legendary breed from extinction and led him to a difficult, more soulful way of life in the wilds of Japan's remote snow country As Dog Man opens, Martha Sherrill brings us to a world that Westerners know very little about - the snow country of Japan during World War II. In a mountain village, we meet Morie Sawataishi, a fierce individualist who has chosen to break the law by keeping an Akita dog hidden in a shed on his property. During the war, the magnificent and intensely loyal Japanese hunting dogs were donated to help the war effort, eaten, or used to make fur vests for the military. By the time of the Japanese surrender in 1945, there were only sixteen Akitas left in the country. The survival of the breed became Morie's passion and life - almost a spiritual calling. Devoted to the dogs, Morie is forever changed. His life becomes radically unconventional - almost preposterous - in ultra-ambitious, conformist Japan. For the dogs, Morie passes up promotions, bigger houses, and prestigious engineering jobs in Tokyo. Instead, he raises a family with his young wife, Kitako - a sheltered urban sophisticate - in Japan's remote and forbidding snow country. Their village is isolated, but interesting characters are always dropping by - dog buddies, in-laws from Tokyo, and a barefoot hunter who lives in the wild. Due in part to Morie's perseverance and passion, the Akita breed strengthens and becomes wildly popular, sometimes selling for millions of yen. Yet Morie won't sell his spectacular dogs. He only likes to give them away. Morie and Kitako remain in the snow country today, living in the traditional Japanese cottage they designed together more than thirty years ago - with tatami mats, an overhanging roof, a deep bathtub, and no central heat. At ninety-four years of age, Morie still raises and trains the Akita dogs that have come to symbolise his life. In beautiful prose that is a joy to read, Martha Sherrill opens up the world of the dog man and his wife, providing a profound look at what it is to be an individualist in a culture that reveres conformity - and what it means to live life in one's own way, while expertly revealing Japan and Japanese culture as we've never seen it before.

Please Excuse My Daughter

by Julie Klam

A woman's hilarious, bittersweet account of growing up in a family of career-shunning, dependence-seeking women and her journey to a state of twenty-first-century self-reliance. Julie Klam was raised as the only daughter of a Jewish family in the exclusive WASP stronghold of Bedford, New York. Her mother was sharp, glamorous, and funny, but did not think that work was a woman's responsibility. Her father was fully supportive, not just of his wife's staying at home, but also of her extravagant lifestyle. Her mother's offbeat parenting style-taking Julie out of school to go to lunch at Bloomingdale's, for example-made her feel well-cared-for (and well-dressed) but left her unprepared for graduating and entering the real world. She had been brought up to look pretty and wait for a rich man to sweep her off her feet. But what happened if he never showed up? When Julie gets married to a hardworking but not wealthy man-one who expects her to be part of a modern couple and contribute financially to the marriage-she realizes how ambivalent and ill-equipped she is for life. Once she gives birth to a daughter, she knows she must grow up, get to work, and teach her child the self-reliance that she never learned. Delivered in an uproariously funny, sweet, self-effacing, and utterly memorable voice, Please Excuse My Daughteris a bighearted memoir from an irresistible new writer.

The Ten-Year Nap

by Meg Wolitzer

The Jane Austen of contemporary sexual politics transforms domestic fiction u this time into a compelling, compassionate and witty inquiry into the price of ambition, the value of work, issues of class, money and the meaning of motherhood. For a group of four New York friends, the past ten years have been defined by marriage and motherhood. Educated to believe that they and their generation would conquer the world, they nonetheless left high-powered jobs to stay at home with their babies. What was intended as a temporary time-out has turned into a decade. Now at forty, without professions to define them, and with children growing up, Amy, Jill, Roberta and Karen wake up to a life and a future that is not what they expected or intended. When Amy gets drawn into the ambit of a seductive and successful working mother who seems to have it all - work, love family - a lifetime's worth of concerns, both practical and existential open up. As Amy's fascination grows, the four friends are forced to confront the choices they've made in opting for stay-at-home motherhood over career, for domestic over financial responsiblity. Wolitzer's narrative brilliantly juggles and manipulates the classic image of the harassed, emotionally unfulfilled but dynamic working mother, against the secret satisfaction, regret and powerlessness of the stay-at-home version - and behind that their own mothers, an earlier generation who had fewer options and bigger dreams. Nothing is quite as it seems, though, and Amy faces a real-life wake-up call when the romantic dream she's conjured up starts to curdle, reality takes hold, and the landscape begins to shift for all of them. . .

Song Yet Sung

by James Mcbride

Nowhere has the drama of American slavery played itself out with more tension than in the dripping swamps of Maryland's eastern shore, where abolitionists such as Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman, born less than thirty miles apart, faced off against nefarious slave traders in a catch-me-if-you-can game that fueled fear and brought economic hardship to both white and black families. Trapped in the middle were the watermen, a group of America's most original and colorful pioneers, poor oystermen who often found themselves caught between the needs of rich plantation owners and the roaring Chesapeake, which often claimed their lives. The powerful web of relationships in a small Chesapeake Bay town collapses as two souls face off in a gripping page-turner. Liz Spocott, a young runaway who has odd dreams about the future of the colored race, mistakenly inspires a breakout from the prison attic of a notorious slave thief named Patty Cannon. As Cannon stokes revenge, Liz flees into the nefarious world of the underground railroad with its double meanings and unspoken clues to freedom known to the slaves of Dorchester County as "The Code. " Denwood Long, a troubled slave catcher and eastern shore waterman, is coaxed out of retirement to break "The Code" and track down Liz. Filled with rich history-much of the story is drawn from historical events-and told in McBride's signature lyrical storytelling style, Song Yet Sung brings into full view a world long misunderstood in American fiction: how slavery worked, and the haunting, moral choices that lived beneath the surface, pressing both whites and blacks to search for relief in a world where both seemed to lose their moral compass. This is a story of tragic triumph, violent decisions, and unexpected kindness. .

The Reason for God

by Timothy Keller

At a time when scientists and critics such as Richard Dawkins and Christopher Hitchens are questioning the validity of religion, this book uses literature, philosophy and reason to explain how faith in a Christian God is a soundly rational belief. Timothy Keller, pastor of an inner-city New York church, looks at some of the most widespread accusations levelled at Christianity, including Christianity's claim of exclusivity; how a good God could allow suffering; why the Church is responsible for injustice; and if science has disproved religious belief. This book has been written for believers and non-believers, sceptics and churchgoers, and charts a brilliantly considered and impassioned path to Christianity - a Mere Christianity for the twenty-first century.

Foreskin's Lament

by Shalom Auslander

A New York Times Notable Book, and a "chaotic, laugh riot"(San Francisco Chronicle) of a memoir- first time in trade paperback. Shalom Auslander was raised with a terrified respect for God. Even as he grew up and was estranged from his community, his religion and its traditions, he could not find the path to a life where he didn't struggle daily with the fear of God's formidable wrath. Foreskin's Lament reveals Auslander's "painfully, cripplingly, incurably, miserably religious" youth in a strict, socially isolated Orthodox community, and recounts his rebellion and efforts to make a new life apart from it. His combination of unrelenting humor and anger renders a rich and fascinating portrait of a man grappling with his faith and family.

Slummy Mummy

by Fiona Neill

A smart, laugh-out-loud debut novel about a deeply flawed but endearing stay-at-home mom, a book for anyone who took Bridget Jones to heart a decade ago-and now has kids. Lucy Sweeney has three sons, a husband on a short fuse, and a tendency toward domestic disaster. It has been years since the dirty laundry pile was less than three feet high, months since she remembered to have sex, and weeks since her toddler started using the trash can as a toilet. Lucy is living in a constant state of emergency, caught between perfectionist Yummy Mummy No. 1 and competitive Alpha Mum, making it hard for her to remember exactly why she exchanged her career and sanity for less than blissful domesticity. When she begins a flirtation with Sexy Domesticated Dad, a father from the school car-pool lane, the string of white lies to cover up the trail of chaos and illicit desire starts to unravel and disaster looms. Slummy Mummy: The Secret Life of Lucy Sweeneyis a hilarious novel about the dilemmas of modern marriage and motherhood for those who never discovered their inner domestic goddess. Pitch-perfect and satisfyingly smart, it does for the stay-at-home mother what Allison Pearson's blockbuster bestseller I Don't Know How She Does Itdid for the working mom: It offers a lovable, flawed character who resonates, entertains, and undoubtedly has it worse than you do.

The Office of Desire

by Martha Moody

From the nationally bestselling author of the novel Best Friends: a touching novel about five very different people navigating work-and life. Alicia, Brice, and Caroline are the ABCs-three close friends who have been brought together while working at the cozy medical practice of Drs. Markowitz and Strub in Midburg, Ohio. But when Alicia and Dr. Strub begin an affair, a dramatic chain of events ensues that gradually but drastically changes the office environment-ultimately requiring all five coworkers to redefine their relationships to one another. Finally, a questionable business venture precipitates a tragedy that will either tear them apart or bring them closer together. Touching and insightful, The Office of Desire an office novel that will resonate with anyone who has ever experienced the unlikely alliances that develop at work, and seen what happens when those relationships are altered. .

Joseph's Bones

by Jerome M. Segal

A bold and radical reinterpretation of the Old Testament. "Brilliant. . . Nothing quite like it has appeared in years. " (Jack Miles, author of God: A Biography ) Imagine if someone who had never heard of Judaism or Christianity read the Old Testament. How could the relationship between God and humanity possibly be understood? In Joseph's Bones, Segal approaches the Bible from this fresh perspective-one framed by the story of the Israelites' fidelity to Joseph-and finds something unexpected: an account of the human condition that reads like an existential novel about the struggle of mankind against the unpredictable and often unwarranted wrath of God. This is a rarity in Biblical interpretation- brilliant and rigorously argued, "a work of stunning originality. "

America at Night

by Larry J. Kolb

A shocking true account only one man can tell, "the kind. . . about which fiction writers can only dream. "--New York Times When the Department of Homeland Security suspects that two former CIA operatives are at the center of plot involving money laundering and the funding of Al Qaeda-and when their supposedly comprehensive database turns up little to no information on either man-it takes onetime spy Larry Kolb to crack the case. But when Kolb begins to connect the dots, he realizes something even more sinister is afoot, and that he's on to the biggest possible con with the highest political stakes. America at Nightreads like a thriller, but the story is true and extensively documented. Kolb shows us how one well-informed individual did what all of our security agencies could not: trail two brilliant covert political operatives through a labyrinth of disguised identities and dark crimes to expose corruption at the highest levels.

The Beautiful Things that Heaven Bears

by Dinaw Mengestu

A literary debut hailed by The New York Times Book Review as a great American novel. Awards Include:Finalist for the Young Lions Fiction AwardFinalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for First FictionWinner of the Guardian First Book PrizeNew York Times Notable BookWinner of the National Book Foundation's "5 Under 35" AwardRecipient of a Lannan Literary FellowshipWinner of the Prix du Premier RomanNamed the Seattle Reads Selection of 2008Seventeen years ago, Sepha Stephanos fled the Ethiopian Revolution for a new start in the United States. Now he finds himself running a failing grocery store in a poor African-American section of Washington, D. C. , his only companions two fellow African immigrants who share his bitter nostalgia and longing for his home continent. Years ago and worlds away Sepha could never have imagined a life of such isolation. As his environment begins to change, hope comes in the form of a friendship with new neighbors Judith and Naomi, a white woman and her biracial daughter. But when a series of racial incidents disturbs the community, Sepha may lose everything all over again.

Unhooked

by Laura Sessions Stepp

Features a new Afterword for this edition. A controversial look at today's sexual hook-up culture, and "[a] book. . . you won't stop talking about. "-Patricia Cornwell From the front lines of today's sexual battlefield comes an eye-opening examination of the hookup culture, seen through the personal experiences of the teenage girls and young women who live it-and who are left unprepared for its consequences. The Pulitzer Prize-winning author presents a disturbing and enlightening indictment of the hookup culture, the social forces that contribute to it, and what can be done to change it. .

Brooklyn was Mine

by Valerie Steiker Chris Knutsen

A tribute to New York City's most literary borough-featuring original nonfiction pieces by today's most celebrated writers. Of all the urban landscapes in America, perhaps none has so thoroughly infused and nurtured modern literature as Brooklyn. Though its literary history runs deep-Walt Whitman, Truman Capote, and Norman Mailer are just a few of its storied inhabitants-in recent years the borough has seen a growing concentration of bestselling novelists, memoirists, poets, and journalists. It has become what Greenwich Village once was for an earlier generation: a wellspring of inspiration and artistic expression. Brooklyn Was Minegives some of today's best writers an opportunity to pay tribute to the borough they love in 20 original essays that draw on past and present to create a mosaic that brilliantly captures the quality and diversity of a unique, literary landscape. Contributors include: Emily Barton, Susan Choi, Rachel Cline, Philip Dray, Jennifer Egan, Colin Harrison, Joanna Hershon, Jonathan Lethem, Dinaw Mengestu, Elizabeth Gaffney, Lara Vapnyar, Lawrence Osborne, Katie Roiphe, John Burnham Schwartz, Vijay Seshadri, Darcey Steinke, Darin Strauss, Alexandra Styron, Robert Sullivan With an introduction by Phillip Lopate.

The Teahouse Fire

by Ellis Avery

Set in the late nineteenth century at a turning point in Japan's relationship with the western world, THE TEAHOUSE FIRE is the story of Aurelia, a young French-American girl who, after the death of her mother, finds herself lost and alone in Japan and in need of a new family. Knowing only a few words of Japanese she hides in a tea house and is adopted by the family who own it: gradually falling in love with both the tea ceremony and with her young mistress, Yukako. As Aurelia grows up she devotes herself to the family and its failing fortunes in the face of civil war and western intervention, and to Yukako's love affairs and subsequent marriage. But her feelings for her mistress are never reciprocated and as tensions mount in the household Aurelia begins to realise that to the world around her she will never be anything but a foreigner. Like MEMOIRS OF A GEISHA, THE TEAHOUSE FIRE is an utterly convincing recreation of a now lost world and a fascinating insight into the intricacies and intimacies of the tea ceremony.

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