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The Bond

by Sampson Davis George Jenkins Rameck Hunt D. Margaret Bernstein

Drs. Sampson Davis, George Jenkins, and Rameck Hunt discovered early in their friendship that they shared a disturbing trait: as children, they navigated dangerous inner-city life without a father's guidance. In spite of this, they escaped delinquency and crime to form the Pact, dedicated to putting themselves on the road to success. Now, the Three Doctors make a new promise: to set aside their resentment, and rebuild the relationships with their fathers-men they barely recognize. Told in alternating voices between father and son, The Bond explores the hard lessons of growing up without a father and suggests ways to stem the tide of fatherlessness in communities across the country. Honest, brave, and poignant, The Bond is a book for every child and every family. .

Talking to Heaven

by James Van Praagh

Doreen Virtue and James Van Praagh have drawn upon their combined years of spiritual counseling work to bring you a healing tool to create clear conversations with heaven. Your loved ones in heaven want to talk with you, and share their love and reassurance to help heal your grief. With these Talking to Heaven Mediumship Cards, you can ask a departed friend or family member a question and receive answers through the 44 beautiful cards in the deck and the messages in the accompanying guidebook. Designed to complement Doreen and James's How to Heal a Grieving Heart, this card deck is a powerful reassurance of the reality of heaven.

Smashed

by Koren Zailckas

The day Koren turned fourteen she emerged from her friend's kitchen clutching a bottle of Southern Comfort. At fifteen she and Natalie sneaked out one summer night, then next morning had to piece back together forgotten fragments of drink, men and misplaced clothes. At sixteen she was carried through the hospital doors unconscious. And so it began. . . Koren was a sweet and normal teenager, from a stable home and loving parents, yet throughout her teens and twenties she regularly drank herself to the point of oblivion. This is the shocking but utterly recognisable story of a girl who used alcohol to help herself grow up. It began by making her feel better and making life seem less scary. It helped her know who she was, how she felt. Over time, though, she found herself almost unable to meet anyone new or embark on any social occasion at college and, later, in work, without being drunk. Finally, Koren's experimentation descended into a chaotic, dangerous dependency, until, one day, she decided she needed help. Smashed is a beautifully written book and a brutally honest account of just how easy it is to surrender your life to binge drinking. Sometimes funny, sometimes terrifying, it is unfailingly sympathetic. Told in a voice that compels but never preaches, this is a book that needed to be written and demands to be read.

Small Giants

by Bo Burlingham

It's an axiom of business that great companies grow their revenues and profits year after year. Yet quietly, under the radar, a small number of companies have rejected the pressure of endless growth to focus on more satisfying business goals. Goals like being great at what they do . . . creating a great place to work . . . providing great customer service . . . making great contributions to their communities . . . and finding great ways to lead their lives. In Small Giants, veteran journalist Bo Burlingham takes us deep inside fourteen remarkable companies that have chosen to march to their own drummer. They include Anchor Brewing, the original microbrewer; CitiStorage Inc. , the premier independent records-storage business; Clif Bar & Co. , maker of organic energy bars and other nutrition foods; Righteous Babe Records, the record company founded by singer-songwriter Ani DiFranco; Union Square Hospitality Group, the company of restaurateur Danny Meyer; and Zingerman's Community of Businesses, including the world-famous Zingerman's Deli of Ann Arbor. Burlingham shows how the leaders of these small giants recognized the full range of choices they had about the type of company they could create. And he shows how we can all benefit by questioning the usual definitions of business success. In his new afterward, Burlingham reflects on the similarities and learning lessons from the small giants he covers in the book. .

Sharpe's Sword: Richard Sharpe and the Salamanca Campaign, June and July 1812 (Richard Sharpe #14)

by Bernard Cornwell

Richard Sharpe is once again at war. But this time his enemy is just one man - the ruthless Colonel Leroux. Sharpe's mission is to safeguard El Mirador, a spy whose network of agents is vital to British victory. Sharpe is forced into a new world of political and military intrigue. And in unfamiliar surroundings of aristocratic Spanish society, his only guide is La Marquesa - a woman with her own secrets to conceal. . . Soldier, hero, rogue - Sharpe is the man you always want on your side. Born in poverty, he joined the army to escape jail and climbed the ranks by sheer brutal courage. He knows no other family than the regiment of the 95th Rifles whose green jacket he proudly wears.

Second Sight

by Amanda Quick

In financial straits and on a sure path to spinsterhood, Venetia Milton thought her stay at the remote, ramshackle Arcane House, far from society's prying eyes, would be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to engineer her own ravishment. She was there to photograph the relics and artifacts collected by a highly secretive organization, founded two centuries earlier by an eccentric alchemist. And the alchemist's descendant - her employer, Mr. Gabriel Jones - had the eyes of a sorcerer . . . After a night to remember, Venetia is prepared to cherish the memories of her romantic encounter and move on, but she is shattered when, shortly after their night together, she reads of Jones's death in the papers. As a private tribute to her one-time lover, she adopts the name "Mrs. Jones" and the guise of a respectable widow, and embarks on a new career as a fashionable photographer in London, where her unique ability to "see" beyond her subjects and capture that quality in her photography makes her photographs highly prized. But her romantic whim causes unexpected trouble. For one thing, Mr. Jones is about to stride, living and breathing, back into her life. And the bonds that tie them together include more than just the memory of passion; Venetia's special "double vision" has caught the attention of someone Mr. Jones is tracking - someone who will go to any lengths, even murder, to possess an ancient, extraordinary secret that has been lost for centuries. Someone who believes that as the "wife" of Mr. Jones, Venetia is the key. Now, as she introduces Gabriel about town as her miraculously back-from-the-dead "husband," Venetia must join him in a perilous quest to track down a dangerous opponent who manages to stay one step ahead. As they explore the darker, wilder underbelly of the modern, scientific Victorian world, they must see through society's illusions - or this time, Gabriel Jones may not be coming from the dead, and neither may Mrs. Jones.

Savage Love

by Dan Savage

Welcome to the hot new wave of writing about sex: Savage Love. Columnist Dan Savage has hand-picked over 300 letters from six years worth of "Savage Love," a no-holds-barred syndicated sex-advice column which runs in 16 papers in the United States and Canada, including The Village Voice and the San Francisco Weekly. An original and funny thinker, thrashing around in the playground of human sexuality, Savage advises on a wide range of titillating topics:* What is the best seduction music?* How do I come out to my fundamentalist parents?* What is so wonderful about intercourse, anyway?Forget Anka Radakovich and Isadora Altman. Tune in to Dan Savage as he answers these questions and much more in his own uniquely irreverent and sexually spunky style.

Losing Gemma

by Katy Gardner

This is the story of Gemma and me: how I lost her, I suppose. I don't usually tell it to anyone but myself; I save it for the darkest moments. Losing Gemma , Katy's Gardners debut novel about adventure, losing your best friend, and self-discovery, has been translates into twelve languages and compared to Alex Garland's breakthrough novel, The Beach, among many others. This time, the backpacking heroes are girls. What makes Losing Gemma truly unforgettable, is the read itself; it's an impossibly suspenseful novel that's as gripping as it is psychologically rich. Two young women have gone looking for adventure, backpacking through India-but only one returns. The other one believes it's all her fault. And the mystery behind what really happened during their fateful visit to a secluded shrine compels the reader forward to a page-turning conclusion that's shocking, strange, and haunting. .

POP! Create the Perfect Pitch, Title, and Tagline for Anything

by Sam Horn

Why do some ideas break out and others fade away? What causes people to become so excited about a product that they can't wait to tell their friends? How can an idea be communicated so that it catches fire in people's imaginations? Popular author, consultant and workshop leader Sam Horn identifies what makes an idea, message or product break out - and presents a simple and proven process: POP! (Purposeful, Original, Pithy) to create one-of-a-kind ideas, products and messages that pop through the noise, off the shelf and into consumers' imaginations.

Passing

by Nella Larsen

First published to critical acclaim in 1929, Passing firmly established Nella Larsen's prominence among women writers of the Harlem Renaissance. The Modern Library is proud to present Passing--an electrifying story of two women who cross the color line in 1920s New York--together with a new Introduction by the Obie Award- winning playwright and novelist Ntozake Shange. Irene Redfield, the novel's protagonist, is a woman with an enviable life. She and her husband, Brian, a prominent physician, share a comfortable Harlem town house with their sons. Her work arranging charity balls that gather Harlem's elite creates a sense of purpose and respectability for Irene. But her hold on this world begins to slip the day she encounters Clare Kendry, a childhood friend with whom she had lost touch. Clare--light-skinned, beautiful, and charming--tells Irene how, after her father's death, she left behind the black neighborhood of her adolescence and began passing for white, hiding her true identity from everyone, including her racist husband. As Clare begins inserting herself into Irene's life, Irene is thrown into a panic, terrified of the consequences of Clare's dangerous behavior. And when Clare witnesses the vibrancy and energy of the community she left behind, her burning desire to come back threatens to shatter her careful deception. Brilliantly plotted and elegantly written, Passing offers a gripping psychological portrait of emotional extremity. The New York Times Book Review called Larsen "adroit at tracing the involved processes of a mind divided against itself, that fights between the dictates of reason and desire. " The Saturday Review of Literature said, "[Larsen] has produced a work so fine, sensitive, and distinguished that it rises above race categories and becomes that rare object, a good novel. "

Pan

by Knut Hamsun

Between "Hunger" and "Growth of the Soil" lies the time generally allotted to a generation, but at first glance the two books seem much farther apart. One expresses the passionate revolt of a homeless wanderer against the conventional routine of modern life. The other celebrates a root-fast existence bounded in every direction by monotonous chores. The issuance of two such books from the same pen suggests to the superficial view a complete reversal of position. The truth, however, is that Hamsun stands today where he has always stood. His objective is the same. If he has changed, it is only in the intensity of his feeling and the mode of his attack. What, above all, he hates and combats is the artificial uselessness of existence which to him has become embodied in the life of the city as opposed to that of the country. Problems do not enter into the novels of Hamsun in the same manner as they did into the plays of Ibsen. Hamsun would seem to take life as it is, not with any pretense at its complete acceptability, but without hope or avowed intention of making it over. If his tolerance be never free from satire, his satire is on the other hand always easily tolerant. One might almost suspect him of viewing life as something static against which all fight would be futile. Even life's worst brutalities are related with an offhandedness of manner that makes you look for the joke that must be at the bottom of them. The word reform would seem to be strangely eliminated from his dictionary, or, if present, it might be found defined as a humorous conception of something intrinsically unachievable.

Once Upon A Dream

by Nora Roberts Jill Gregory Marianne Willman Ruth Ryan Langan

Roberts heads the cast of writers that includes Jill Gregory, Ruth Ryan Langan, and Marianne Willman in delivering all-new tales of dreams and desires. Roberts' story, "In Dreams", concerns a beautiful woman who is drawn to a castle in the forests of Ireland and becomes the link to a stranger's past.

Lucky in Love

by Susan Rabin Barbara Lagowski

From the bestselling author of 101 Ways to Flirt and How to Attract Anyone, Anytime, Anyplace comes a new book designed to help you seize every flirting opportunity and find the love of your life. Are some of us simply luckier when it comes to love? Is it true that some people are just better flirts? Relationship and flirting expert Susan Rabin's new book teaches us that while everyone can learn to flirt, the real key to finding love is to take advantage of every occasion to put those flirting skills to work. In Lucky in Love, Rabin presents weekly strategies that both strengthen your flirting abilities and teach you how to embrace opportunity, turning impromptu conversations into memorable encounters, making exciting and enduring connections, and most importantly, increasing your chances of finding love every single week of the year. .

Lovers and Ladies

by Jo Beverley

In these two delectable novels, someone craves to be married and loses sight of the joys of true love--until their heart is opened unexpectedly. . . The Fortune Hunter : A stunning beauty rejects the charming suitor who isn't wealthy enough to save her impoverished family. But she can't so easily dismiss the memory of their sweet shared kiss. Deirdre and Don Juan : The dashing Earl of Everdon is most eager to marry someone-anyone-who will bear him an heir. But when he meets a quiet, well-bred lady who fits the bill, he must resort to an amorous dance of deception to gain her acceptance to his proposal. .

Intelligence in Nature

by Jeremy Narby

Continuing the journey begun in his acclaimed book The Cosmic Serpent, the noted anthropologist ventures firsthand into both traditional cultures and the most up-todate discoveries of contemporary science to determine nature's secret ways of knowing. Anthropologist Jeremy Narby has altered how we understand the Shamanic cultures and traditions that have undergone a worldwide revival in recent years. Now, in one of his most extraordinary journeys, Narby travels the globe-from the Amazon Basin to the Far East-to probe what traditional healers and pioneering researchers understand about the intelligence present in all forms of life. Intelligence in Nature presents overwhelming illustrative evidence that independent intelligence is not unique to humanity alone. Indeed, bacteria, plants, animals, and other forms of nonhuman life display an uncanny penchant for self-deterministic decisions, patterns, and actions. Narby presents the first in-depth anthropological study of this concept in the West. He not only uncovers a mysterious thread of intelligent behavior within the natural world but also probes the question of what humanity can learn from nature's economy and knowingness in its own search for a saner and more sustainable way of life. .

Home to Holly Springs

by Jan Karon

Readers of the nine bestselling Mitford novels have been captivated by Jan Karon?s ?gift for illuminating the struggles that creep into everyday lives?along with a vividly imagined world? (People). They learned quickly that ?after you?ve spent time in Mitford, you?ll want to come back? (Chicago Tribune). Millions eagerly awaited the publication of each novel, relishing the story of the bookish and bighearted Episcopal priest and the extraordinary fullness of his seemingly ordinary life. Now, Jan Karon enchants us with the story of the newly retired priest?s spur-of-the-moment adventure. For the first time in decades, Father Tim returns to his birthplace, Holly Springs, Mississippi, in response to a mysterious, unsigned note saying simply: ?Come home. ? Little does he know how much these two words will change his life. A story of long-buried secrets, forgiveness, and the wonder of discovering new people, places, and depth of feeling, Home to Holly Springs will enthrall new readers and longtime fans alike. .

Grace (Eventually)

by Anne Lamott

The world, the community, the family, the heart: these are the beautiful and complicated arenas in which our lives unfold. Wherever you look, there's trouble and wonder, pain and beauty, restoration and darkness. Yet if you look carefully, in nature or in the kitchen, in ordinariness or in mystery, beyond the emotional muck we all slog through, you'll find it eventually: a path, some light to see by, in other words, grace. Here, Anne Lamott describes how she copes with the missteps, detours, and roadblocks in her walk of faith. Book jacket.

Fat Camp

by Deborah Blumenthal

Camp! Freedom, first kisses, summer fun. . . but not at Camp Calliope, a prison camp for the overweight. That's where Cam Phillips' parents have shipped her off to eat controlled portions, endure rigorous exercise, and sleep in a bunk full of girls who'd rather exchange recipes than ghost stories and gossip. Except for one cool girl from Texas, Faith Masters-who's normal enough to help her stay sane and temporarily replace her best friend, Evie. And then there's Jesse-the only thing close enough to drool-worthy on the camp's menu. Cam can totally relate to him, since his basketball-coach Dad sounds a lot like her perfectly thin, successful Mom. It looks like for the next eight weeks, only the issues (and not the food) on Cam's plate will be supersized.

Fantasyland

by Sam Walker

Every spring, millions of Americans prepare to take part in one of the oddest, most obsessive, and most engrossing rituals in the sports pantheon: Rotisserie baseball, a fantasy game where armchair fans match wits by building their own teams. In 2004, Sam Walker, a sports columnist for the Wall Street Journal, decided to explore this phenomenon by talking his way into Tout Wars, a league reserved for the nation's top experts. The result is one of the most sheerly entertaining sports books in years and a matchless look into the heart and soul of our national pastime. .

Facundo

by Domingo F. Sarmiento

Ostensibly a biography of the gaucho barbarian Juan Facundo Quiroga, Facundo is also a complex, passionate work of history, sociology, and political commentary, and Latin America's most important essay of the nineteenth century. .

The Personal History of Rachel DuPree

by Ann Weisgarber

Short-listed for the Orange Award for New Writers & long-listed for the Orange Prize It is 1917 in the South Dakota Badlands, and summer has been hard. Fourteen years have passed since Rachel and Isaac DuPree left Chicago to stake a claim in this unforgiving land. Isaac, a former Buffalo Soldier, is fiercely proud: black families are rare in the West, and black ranchers even rarer. But it hasn't rained in months, the cattle bellow with thirst, and supplies are dwindling. Pregnant, and struggling to feed her family, Rachel is isolated by more than just geography. She is determined to give her surviving children the life they deserve, but she knows that her husband will never leave his ranch. Moving and majestic, The Personal History of Rachel DuPree is an unforgettable novel about love and loyalty, homeland and belonging. Above all, it is the story of one woman's courage in the face of the most punishing adversity.

The Black Nile

by Dan Morrison

A spectacular modern-day adventure along the Nile River from Lake Victoria to the Mediterranean Sea Inspired by Alan Moorehead's classic river chronicles, The Blue Nileand The White Nile, foreign correspondent Dan Morrison bought a plank-board boat, summoned a childhood buddy who'd never been off American soil, and set out from Uganda, paddling the White Nile on a quest across Sudan toward Cairo. In the vein of Redmond O'Hanlon and Ryszard Kapuscinski, the story of Morrison's four-thousandmile trip is a gripping blend of travel narrative and reportage that reveals this vast region's riches, troubles, and paradoxes. Morrison follows the river as the locals do-by boat, bus, and on foot-past the contested borderlands of Sudan, where a hidden oil war still rages, to the air-conditioned cafés of Khartoum and through modern Cairo, where control of the Nile outranks the Iranian nuclear program as a national security issue. By turns funny and frightening, The Black Nileis an engrossing and thoughtful contemporary portrait of a complex region in profound transition.

Alan Lomax

by John Szwed

Writer, musicologist, archivist, singer, DJ, filmmaker, record, radio and TV producer, Alan Lomax was a man of many parts. Without him the history of popular music would have been very different. Armed with a tape-recorder and his own near-flawless good taste, Lomax spent years travelling the US, particularly the south, recording its heritage of music and song for posterity, bringing to light the talents of performers ranging from Jelly Roll Morton to Leadbelly and Muddy Waters, and crucially influencing generations of musicians from Pete Seeger to the Stones, from Woody Guthrie to Bob Dylan. His influence continues: recordings made by Lomax are the core of the sound-tracks of Oh Brother, Where art Thou? and Gangs of New York, and even featured, remixed, on Moby's Play. John Szwed's biography is the first ever of this remarkable and contradictory man (whom he both knew and worked with for ten years); through it Szwed will tell the story of a musical and political era, as he did so successfully in his previous book on Miles Davis.

A Stranger Like You

by Elizabeth Brundage

"A pithy, ironic L. A. noir full of broken dreams and snappy repartee. " -Stewart O'Nan After years of working a dead-end job at an insurance company in New Jersey, Hugh Waters finally sells his screenplay to a major Hollywood studio. But when the young, Ivy League hotshot Hedda Chase takes over as top executive, she finds his story violent, unconvincing, and riddled with clichés, and quickly pulls the plug on the deal. So Hugh hops on a plane to L. A. hoping to talk things over-or perhaps he'll find another way to prove that his script isn't so implausible after all. . . Evocative of Patricia Highsmith, and set against high-voltage backdrops from Hollywood to Abu Dhabi, A Stranger Like You is a taut and terrifying thriller about the lengths to which we'll go to make our dreams come true.

My Teenage Werewolf

by Lauren Kessler

A veteran journalist navigates the mother-daughter relationship at its most crucial moment With the eye of a reporter, the curiosity of an anthropologist, and the open (and sometimes wounded) heart of a mother, award-winning author Lauren Kessler embeds herself in her about-to-be-teenage daughter's life. In seventh- and eighth-grade classrooms, at home, online, at the mall, and at summer camp, Kessler observes, investigates, chronicles- and participates in-the life of a twenty-first-century teen. As she begins to better understand and appreciate her mercurial daughter, their relationship-at first a mirror of the author's difficult relationship with her own mother-lurches in new directions. With the help of a resident teen expert (her daughter), as well as teachers, doctors, therapists, and other mothers, Kessler illuminates the age-old struggle from both sides, gracefully interweaving personal experience with journalistic inquiry. Funny, poignant, and insightful, My Teenage Werewolfexplores the fascinating and scary world of today's teen as it comes to grips with the single most important relationship in a woman's life.

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