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Small Beauties

by Elvira Woodruff Adam Rex

"One day this child shall hold the very heart of our family in the palm of her hand," predicts Granny on the day Darcy Heart O'Hara is born in a cottage on Derry Lane, in the town of Pobble O'Keefe, in County Kerry, Ireland.Darcy grows up to be a noticer, delighting in the small beauties all around her: a dew-covered spider web, castles in the clouds, a shiny wooden rosary bead. Life is simple but sweet in Pobble O'Keefe, with her family gathered round the hearth in the evenings while Granddad's voice fills the small room with stories. But in 1845, a blight strikes the land, the potatoes turn rotten, and Darcy and her family must leave Ireland forever. How will Darcy ever find a way to to bring the small beauties of home across the sea to America? Elvira Woodruff's story of emigration, heartbreak, and hope is vividly illustrated with the warm, evocative oil paintings of Adam Rex.

The Most Beautiful Book in the World

by Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt

Balthazar is a successful author; Odette is a cashier at a supermarket. Balthazar has a beautiful wife and a delightful home; Odette and the two troubled kids she is raising alone live in subsidised housing. Life has been generous to Balthazar and harsh to Odette. Yet, of the two Balthazar is the unhappy one. In this, and other short stories, Schmitt enchants his readers with a style that is spirited and buoyant as he moves from the story of a barefooted princess to that of a prisoner in a Soviet gulag and a perennially disgruntled perfectionist.

The Woman with the Bouquet

by Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt

In his new collection of stories, the beloved author of "The Most Beautiful Book in the World" probes the paradox that the events that shape our lives are often the stuff of dreams, but nonetheless true.

Limassol

by Yishai Sarid

A high-ranking official in the Israeli secret service is handed a new brief: go undercover as an aspiring novelist to befriend Daphna, an Israeli writer, and her friend Hani, a renowned Palestinian poet. The target is Hani's son Yotam, a wanted terrorist leader. As the agent becomes ingrained in Daphna and Hani's lives, his own sense of right and wrong is clouded. The writers have awoken new feelings, yet his sense of duty remains. At the final moment he must choose between his professional loyalties and the long dormant feelings his new friendships have awoken.

The Girl on the Via Flaminia

by Alfred Hayes

"An author of authentic distinction. "- The New York Times Robert is an American soldier in occupied Rome during the final months of World War II. Lisa is a young woman obliged to work in Mamma Adele's on the Via Flaminia. The passion they feel for one another is fueled by their separate and equally desperate needs. But can love between victor and vanquished ever blossom? This classic story of a poignant love affair informed by the aftermath of war is as relevant and moving today as when it was first published. Alfred Hayes' screenplay for Paisan, directed by Roberto Rossellini, was nominated for an Academy Award.

Death's Dark Abyss

by Massimo Carlotto

A riveting drama of guilt, revenge and justice telling the story of two men and the savage crime that binds them. During a robbery, Raffaello Beggiato takes a young woman and her child hostage and later murders them. Beggiato is arrested, tried and sentenced to life. The victim's father and husband plunge into an ever-deepening abyss until the day, years later, when the murderer seeks pardon - and the wounded Silvano turns predator, ruthlessly plotting his revenge.

The Proof of the Honey

by Salwa Al Neimi

A bestseller throughout the Arab world, a tribute to sex, eroticism, language and liberty, The Proof of the Honey is a superb celebration of female pleasure. A Syrian scholar working in Paris is invited to contribute to a conference on the subject of classic erotic literature in Arabic. The invitation provides occasion for her to evoke memories from her own life, to exult in her personal liberty, her lovers, her desires, and to revisit moments of shared intimacy with other women as they discuss life, love, and sexual desire. Far more than an erotic novel, The Proof of the Honey is a surprising and illuminating voyage into the history of Arabic literature. Borrowing inspiration from The Thousand and One Nights, erudite asides are woven into the fabric of the protagonist's story and the stories of her lovers. Affirming that "Arabic is the language of sex," and making desire the source of her own personal liberty, Al Neimi has written a stirring novel about the place afforded sex in modern Arabic society and its relationship to the long, rich tradition of Arabic erotica. .

Broken Glass Park

by Alina Bronsky

Broken Glass Park made a remarkable debut when it was published in Germany in 2008. Its author, the twenty-nine-year old Russian-born Alina Bronksy has since been hailed as a wunderkind, an immense talent who has been the subject of constant praise and debate. The heroine of this enigmatic, razor-sharp, and thoroughly contemporary novel is seventeen- year-old Sacha Naimann, born in Moscow. Sacha lives in Berlin now with her two younger siblings and, until recently, her mother. She is precocious, independent, skeptical and, since her stepfather murdered her mother several months ago, an orphan. Unlike most of her companions, she doesn?t dream of getting out the tough housing project where they live. Her dreams are different: she wants to write a novel about her mother; and she wants to end the life of Vadim, the man who murdered her. What strikes the reader most in this exceptional novel is Sacha?s voice: candid, self-confident, mature and childlike at the same time: a voice so like the voices of many of her generation with its characteristic mix of worldliness and innocence, skepticism and enthusiasm. This is Sacha?s story and it is as touching as any in recent literature. Germany?s Freundin Magazine called Broken Glass Park ?a ruthless, entertaining portrayal of life on the margins of society. ? But Sacha?s story does not remain on the margins; it goes straight to the heart of what it means to be seventeen in these the first years of the new century. .

The Days of Fear

by Daniele Mastrogiacomo

On March 5, 2007, Daniele Mastrogiacomo, his driver and his interpreter were captured by the Taliban. His captors threatened to execute him if Italy did not immediately withdraw its troops from Afghanistan. When Italy refused this demand, the driver, twenty-five-year old Sayed Agha, was decapitated before Mastrogiacomo?s eyes. A video of this horrifying event was shown around the world, and Mastrogiacomo spent the rest of his time in captivity convinced that a similar fate would soon befall him. His jail, however, was not a dark room hidden away in some urban periphery, but a kind of open-air prison: to escape detection, his captors dragged him from village to village, through opium plantations, along dusty roads and over rugged mountains, from one end of Afghanistan to the other. It was a captivity that consisted in a continuous and nerve-racking confrontation with a world that bore no resemblance to that which he had ever known. Mastrogiacomo draws from his experience not only a hostage?s tale of captivity but also a story that lies at the heart of the eternal human drama: that of a man?s encounter with The Other. As brilliantly crafted as a first-rate suspense novel and with the kind of emotional impact associated with the best literary fiction, Mastrogiacomo?s story of courage and tenacity in the face of imminent danger is unforgettable. .

Tierra del Fuego

by Francisco Coloane

These nine spellbinding stories of adventure, exploration and voyage are peopled with ravenous explorers, fortune hunters, foreign revolutionaries, ill-fated seafarers, intrepid ship's captains and ruthless smugglers. The undeniable protagonist around which these characters gravitate is nature herself. The enduring beauty of the tales lies in the forceful, gripping narrative and the elements that principally comprise this narrative: men, their crimes, passions and the land itself - in all its breathtaking glory and murderous wrath.

The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine

by Alina Bronsky

Rosa is not cut out for motherhood, at least not of the functional kind. She is an outrageously nasty piece of work: overbearing, iron-willed and diabolical. Among the casualties is her daughter, Sulfia, who endures the worst of Rosa's machinations. When Sulfia brings into the world an exceptional child by the name of Aminat, the child seems at first destined to become yet another pawn in Rosa's game - until she finds the strength to rebel in the only way possible, by running away. Years later, Aminat reappears on a popular talent show, setting Rosa back on her trail. . .

French Leave

by Anna Gavalda

Siblings Simon, Garance, and Lola flee a dull family wedding to visit brother Vincent, who is working as a guide at a chateau in the heart of the charming Tours countryside. For a few hours, they forget about the many demands of adulthood and lose themselves in a day of laughter, teasing, and memories.

Concerto to the Memory of an Angel

by Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt

In this vivid collection, Schmitt writes about regret and redemption, about the roles of love and memory in our lives, all with a lightness and compassion that is as rare as it is inspiring.

Get Me Out of Here

by Henry Sutton

Set in London in autumn 2008, Matt Freeman is tired of the hollow corporate life and empty consumerism around him and desperately searches for a means of escape. Get Me Out of Here is a novel of comic anger, success and failure - and, fundamentally, belief - in a wornout city.

The Jerusalem File

by Joel Stone

Jerusalem, that most historic of cities, is seething with its legacy, the futile attempt to determine the future by reenacting past injustices. Levin has lived in Jersualem for most of his adult life. Retired now from the security services, he lives alone a few streets from his wife, continents from his children. Adrift, Levin agrees to follow his friend's wife and discover her secret lover. As Levin watches the woman, he begins to assess her as a potential lover might, but things are complicated when her lover turns up dead. . .

Twelve Who Don't Agree

by Marian Schwartz Valery Panyushkin

Journalist Valery Panyushkin profiles 12 Russians from across the country's social spectrum who have one thing in common: participation in the historic March of the Dissidents in 2007. In flagrant violation of increasingly stringent laws, they shared a belief that the government of Vladmir Putin was betraying the promise of Russia's future. Risking the threats and violent retaliation inflicted upon journalists who dare question the powers that be, Panyushkin boldy illuminates the lives and convictions of these 12 men and women.

Second Reading

by Jonathan Yardley

This collection of 5 dozen pieces of literary criticism was published in the Washington Post between March 2003 and January 2010. It is a collection of Yardley's opinions of books that he believes are worthy of a second look. They scan the realms of fiction, biography and autobiography, memoirs, and history.

Minotaur

by Benjamin Tammuz

On the day of his forty-first birthday, an Israeli secret agent encounters a beautiful, young English woman. He immediately recognizes her as the woman he has been searching for all his life, the one he has loved forever. Though they have never met, he is certain that she is an essential part of his life's destiny. Using all the tricks of his trade and his network of contacts, he takes control of her existence without ever revealing his identity. Alexander Abramov's desperate, dangerous love for a woman half his age consumes everything in its path: time, distance, and rival suitors. Only his own story of a life conditioned by isolation, distrust, and murder can explain his devastating manipulation of the woman he professes to love. .

Lovers

by Daniel Arsand

Sebastian Faure is only fifteen years old when he meets the young nobleman Balthazar de Creon. De Creon, struck by the boy's beauty as much as his talent as a herbal healer, orders Sebastian to his manor so he can instruct him in the ways of the court. His motives are however clouded by his lust and after a brief period of restraint, Balthazar and Sebastian abandon themselves to their passions and imaginations. But in 1749 their affair scandalizes the French court and Balthazar is faced with a heartbreaking ultimatum: repudiate Sebastien and live, or do not and die.

Treasure Island!!!

by Sara Levine

When a college graduate with a history of hapless jobs (ice cream scooper; gift wrapper; laziest ever part-time clerk at The Pet Library) reads Robert Louis Stevenson's novel Treasure Island, she is dumbstruck by the timid design of her life. When had she ever dreamed a scheme? When had she ever done a foolish, overbold act? When had she ever, like Jim Hawkins, broke from her friends, raced for the beach, stolen a boat, killed a man, and eliminated an obstacle that stood in the way of her getting a hunk of gold?Convinced that Stevenson's book is cosmically intended for her, she redesigns her life according to its Core Values: boldness, resolution, independence and horn-blowing. Accompanied by her mother, her sister, and a hostile Amazon parrot that refuses to follow the script, our heroine embarks on a domestic adventure more frightening than anything she'd originally planned. Treasure Island!!! is the story of a ferocious obsession, told by an original voice-intelligent, perverse, relentlessly self- extricating, and funny. .

You Deserve Nothing

by Alexander Maksik

Set in Paris, at an international high school catering to the sons and daughters of wealthy families, You Deserve Nothing is a gripping story of power, idealism, and morality. <P> William Silver is a talented and charismatic young teacher whose unconventional methods raise eyebrows among his colleagues and superiors. His students, however, are devoted to him. His teaching of Camus, Faulkner, Sartre, Keats and other kindred souls breathe life into their sense of social justice and their capacities for philosophical and ethical thought. But unbeknownst to his adoring pupils, Silver proves incapable of living up to the ideals he encourages in others. Emotionally scarred by failures in his personal life and driven to distraction by the City of Light's overpowering carnality and beauty, Silver succumbs to a temptation that will change the course of his life. His fall will render him a criminal in the eyes of some, and all too human in the eyes of others. <P> In Maksik's stylish prose, Paris is sensual, dazzling and dangerously seductive. It serves as a fitting backdrop for a dramatic tale about the tension between desire and action, and about the complex relationship that exists between our public and private selves.

The Nun

by Simonetta Agnello Hornby

August 15, 1839. Messina, Italy. In the home of Marshall don Peppino Padellani di Opiri, preparations for the feast of the Ascension are underway. This may be the last happy day in the life of Agata, the Marshall's daughter. She and the wealthy Giacomo Lepre have fallen in love. Agata however must forsake her beloved Giacomo for the good of her family. Unfortunately the extended families of these illicit lovers cannot come to an agreement in their efforts to put the tawdry matter of their offspring's affair to rest and when Marshall don Peppino dies, Agata's mother decides to ferry her daughter far from Messina, to Naples, where she hopes to garner a stipend from the King. The only boat leaving Messina that day is captained by the young Englishman, James Garson. Following a tempestuous passage to Naples, during which Agata confesses her troubles to James, Agata and her mother find themselves rebuffed by the king and Agata is forced to join a convent. The Benedictine monastery of San Giorgio Stilita is rife with rancor and jealousy, illicit passions and ancient feuds. But Agata remains aloof, devoting herself to the cultivation of medicinal herbs, calmed by the steady rhythms of monastic life. She reads all the books James Garson sends her and follows the news of the various factions struggling to bring unity to Italy. She has accepted her life as a nun, but she is divided by her yearnings for purity and religiosity and her desire to be part of the world. She is increasingly torn when she realizes that her feelings for James Garson, though he is only a distant presence in her life, have eclipsed those for Lepre. .

These Dreams of You

by Steve Erickson

One November night in a canyon outside L. A. , Zan Nordhoc-a failed novelist turned pirate radio DJ-sits before the television with his small, adopted black daughter, watching the election of his country's first black president. In the nova of this historic moment, with an economic recession threatening their home, Zan, his wife and their son set out to solve the enigma of the little girl's life. When they find themselves scattered and strewn across two continents, a mysterious stranger with a secret appears, who sends the story spiraling forty years into the past. .

Three Weeks in December

by Audrey Schulman

In 1899 Jeremy, a young engineer, leaves a small town in Maine to oversee the construction of a railroad across East Africa. In charge of hundreds of Indian laborers, he soon finds himself the reluctant hunter of two lions that are killing his men in almost nightly attacks on their camp. Plagued by fear, wracked with malaria and alienated by a secret he can tell no one, he takes increasing solace in the company of the African who helps him hunt. In 2000 Max, an American ethnobotonist, travels to Rwanda in search of an obscure vine that could become a lifesaving pharmaceutical. Stationed in the mountains, she closely shadows a family of gorillas, the last of their group to survive the encroachment of local poachers. Max bears a striking gift for understanding the ape's non-verbal communication, but their precarious solidarity is threatened as a violent rebel group from the nearby Congo draws close. .

Everything Happens Today

by Jesse Browner

Jesse Browner's dazzling new novel records a single day in the life of Wes, a seventeen-year-old who attends Manhattan's elite Dalton School and lives in Greenwich Village in a dilapidated town house with his terminally ill mother, distant father and beloved younger sister. In the course of one day everything will happen to Wes: he will lose his virginity to the wrong girl and break his own heart, try to meet a Monday morning deadline for a paper on War and Peace, and prepare an elaborate supper he hopes will reunite his family. Wes struggles through the day deep in thoughts of sex, love, Beatles lyrics, friendship, God and French cuisine-a typical teenager with an atypical mind, a memorable young man who comes to the poignant understanding of how fragile but attainable personal happiness can be. Everything Happens Today is funny, moving, generous and exhilarating. With a classic structure that nods, inevitably, to Mrs. Dalloway and characters worthy of comparison to those created by J. D. Salinger, Everything Happens Today will enchant young adults who see themselves in the story as well as adult readers who will be captured by the deeply sympathetic characters and the acute feel for the way we live now. Most readers will want it never to be over. .

Showing 42,376 through 42,400 of 117,756 results

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